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Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2020, 01:20:18 pm »

It's really stressful dealing with my family and their attitudes.  I haven't been home in a while and I constantly ask them to visit me...but their response is like "If you lived in Japan or Thailand I would go there", but I don't want to visit Korea, "cause it doesn't interest me."

How you should respond:

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Quote from: Mr.DeMartino on Yesterday at 01:40:32
    Trump is a liar and a con man.
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Quote from Mr.DeMartino on June 14, 2019 at 02:28:07
Donald Trump is a lying sack of shit


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 3825

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2020, 02:00:21 pm »
I remember my granddad saying that back in the 80s. Though if he's refering to the after effects of the virus, he's probably right
not just the virus, but he knows that generally i earn more money and have a more comfortable lifestyle here in korea than i would back in the UK


  • jimskins
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • July 02, 2014, 12:34:19 pm
    • Paju
Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #22 on: May 31, 2020, 10:45:16 am »
not just the virus, but he knows that generally i earn more money and have a more comfortable lifestyle here in korea than i would back in the UK

My parents acknowledge the above but balanced against my kids and I smoking the equivalent of 2-3 cigarettes a day's worth of air pollution (compared to my hometown in the Lake District where the pm2.5 is around 0) they think I'm nuts for staying and want me to move back ASAP. 

Despite being in a laid-back uni job for the last 10 years I am leaning towards going back -no idea what I'd do workwise- but my wife's career is here which complicates matters further.  I hit 40 at the end of the year and feel like it's now or never.


  • dippedinblush
  • Super Waygook

    • 335

    • November 21, 2013, 11:15:05 am
    • Yangpyeong, South Korea
Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2020, 09:34:07 pm »
I'm fro
I'm throwing my money in now and saying she's from Chatham.
[/quote
I'm throwing my money in now and saying she's from Chatham.

By the same ballpark I mean in Southern Ontario .... I'm not from Chatham-Kent..  (although I have some friends from Tilbury)..guess again hehe
« Last Edit: May 31, 2020, 09:35:59 pm by dippedinblush »


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4895

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm


  • jimskins
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • July 02, 2014, 12:34:19 pm
    • Paju
Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2020, 12:15:54 pm »
I'm grateful for this but I'm a little sceptical as to the 'significant' administration and networking skills I'm supposed to have acquired from my time in my university job.  I think such skills are commonplace: from regularly looking at job vacancies they are worth about 25k a year in the UK, on which I'd struggle to support a family of four.  To earn more than this my only options seem to be qualifying as a public school teacher -no thanks- or going back to my original career in the law and finishing off my training as a lawyer -a significant gamble at my age and with my legal knowledge now being 15 years out of date.


Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2020, 12:36:42 pm »
I'm grateful for this but I'm a little sceptical as to the 'significant' administration and networking skills I'm supposed to have acquired from my time in my university job.  I think such skills are commonplace: from regularly looking at job vacancies they are worth about 25k a year in the UK, on which I'd struggle to support a family of four.  To earn more than this my only options seem to be qualifying as a public school teacher -no thanks- or going back to my original career in the law and finishing off my training as a lawyer -a significant gamble at my age and with my legal knowledge now being 15 years out of date.

It's a tricky one.  I'm in a similar boat to you jimskins (minus the family and dependants though).  And from slightly further south from where you were in the lovely lakes down to the High peak.  I had that 'now or never' thing in January, and now with the covid-19 times, I've reassessed and I'm going to look at things in September.  I don't really see England as an option, because where do you start, and especially because you need something concrete straight away.  Which is tough.  Also, similar to you, I'm fed up with the pollution here.  I want to not worry about whether I can go outside.  Such a hassle.  It's tough leaving a job where I make 25 000 quid a year, doing something I really enjoy, and am really comfortable doing and feel appreciated.  Then going to a possible unknown, and especially now being a more unknown with the pandemic as it is.  I still have pipe dream in my head of being in Warsaw next year. 


  • stoat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1395

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #27 on: June 01, 2020, 01:04:11 pm »
I'm grateful for this but I'm a little sceptical as to the 'significant' administration and networking skills I'm supposed to have acquired from my time in my university job.  I think such skills are commonplace: from regularly looking at job vacancies they are worth about 25k a year in the UK, on which I'd struggle to support a family of four.  To earn more than this my only options seem to be qualifying as a public school teacher -no thanks- or going back to my original career in the law and finishing off my training as a lawyer -a significant gamble at my age and with my legal knowledge now being 15 years out of date.

There are jobs in the UK that pay better in our field, e.g.  teaching EAP at universities, i have a couple of friends who do this, they usually advertise for around 30-35k There are also director of studies jobs, around the same pay.  You'd probably need a DELTA though and of course hiring has probably dropped dramatically recently. There's also IELTS writing examiner jobs which pay OK (175 quid a day) and can be supplemented  I'm contemplating this but when we do it, it'll be with extra side income e.g. rental money on property or a wife's income. I wouldn't want to raise a family on that alone in the UK bearing in mind the tax rate and cost of housing.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2020, 03:44:54 pm by stoat »


  • jimskins
  • Adventurer

    • 70

    • July 02, 2014, 12:34:19 pm
    • Paju
Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #28 on: June 01, 2020, 05:54:50 pm »
It's a tricky one.  I'm in a similar boat to you jimskins (minus the family and dependants though).  And from slightly further south from where you were in the lovely lakes down to the High peak.  I had that 'now or never' thing in January, and now with the covid-19 times, I've reassessed and I'm going to look at things in September.  I don't really see England as an option, because where do you start, and especially because you need something concrete straight away.  Which is tough.  Also, similar to you, I'm fed up with the pollution here.  I want to not worry about whether I can go outside.  Such a hassle.  It's tough leaving a job where I make 25 000 quid a year, doing something I really enjoy, and am really comfortable doing and feel appreciated.  Then going to a possible unknown, and especially now being a more unknown with the pandemic as it is.  I still have pipe dream in my head of being in Warsaw next year. 

Yeah I'm the same apart from the 'really enjoy' part -it's OK and the short hours and long vacation are great for raising kids, but I want to get out of teaching and do something different if I go back home, which is why I'm not really considering the options helpfully mentioned by Stoat above.   Unfortunately -in terms of going home- my wife (Korean) is an actress (no, not the famous kind (yet :)) - so I would be the sole bread-winner.  I'm not even sure she'd get a residency visa with all the ludicrous regulations introduced on Theresa May's watch; the likelihood is she'd continue her career and fly between Korea and England a couple of times a year -again, not ideal.  We have a reasonable chunk of savings but I still think I'd need to be making close to 40k to get anywhere near to the standard of living we have in Korea. 

Obviously my family back home still feel it's better for us to live in England and struggle than live in Korea and be comfortable.  I'm not so sure, I'm terrified of making the brave move and going back and then bitterly regretting it, as one former colleague in the exact same situation as me did.


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1710

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #29 on: June 18, 2020, 12:54:05 pm »
Does anyone's family give you a hard time about your choice to live temporarily or permanently in Korea?

I ask this because my family seems to think/act like my life in Korea is not valid.   I came to Korea the first time and lived in Jeollanamdo for 3 years and then went home, and when I couldn't find a job, I came back to Korea, and have been here since (with aches to go home and aches to stay...but its very hard to stay here permanently if you are not married to a Korean).   

Every time I talk with any member of my family, its like they think my job isn't real/my life isn't real here (i don't know how to explain "real" but...if you have the type of family as I do....you probably moved away from them for a reason...you can probably understand)….  They always say..when you come home and start "your real life"....it just makes me feel worthless.  Cause obviously I have a real life and real friends and a real job.

It's really stressful dealing with my family and their attitudes.  I haven't been home in a while and I constantly ask them to visit me...but their response is like "If you lived in Japan or Thailand I would go there", but I don't want to visit Korea, "cause it doesn't interest me."

So it's really hard for me to even talk to them sometimes given their close-minded views about Korea and what my role is here...So i have shut down.

Does anyone have any negativity coming from their families about their choice to move here?  (Hopefully your families are not as negative as mine) and how do you deal with it?

Strange.  In 2020 when there's so much info about Korea?  Try in 2005 or so when not much was known about Korea except the Korean War and MASH.  The few Koreans folks did meet in North America left when Korea was a poor country and told folks not to bother going.  Try coming here against that headwind and also against the backdrop of NK dropping their first atom bomb.  Nowadays, Korea is pretty well known as a safe place except the North doing shennanigans.  More livable now but pay in relation to inflation much lower. 


  • leaponover
  • Expert Waygook

    • 681

    • March 05, 2012, 12:08:16 pm
    • Iksan, S. Korea
Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #30 on: June 18, 2020, 01:43:29 pm »
My family always says to me, "If you are happy, we are happy."

1. They know the hell I can raise when I'm not happy.
2. They've seen me at my lowest.

No issues at all and they always tell me that they are happy I found a life here.


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4895

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #31 on: June 27, 2020, 03:28:43 pm »
I'm fed up with the pollution here.  I want to not worry about whether I can go outside.  Such a hassle.

I still have pipe dream in my head of being in Warsaw next year.

Warsaw looks fascinating but be aware Poland has bad air pollution, too.

https://www.gem.wiki/Top_ten_largest_coal_plants_in_the_world

Have you been to the Netherlands? Amazing air. Maybe try to get a job there if you can swing it.



Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #32 on: June 28, 2020, 10:13:08 pm »
My family is actually happy as the US is in absolute shambles at the moment


Re: How does your family feel about you being in Korea?
« Reply #33 on: June 29, 2020, 08:01:01 am »
My family is actually happy as the US is in absolute shambles at the moment

For real. We had plans for my wife to give birth in America in September, but that’s no longer in the cards, and now we’re leaning toward me not returning in the fall for my final semester of nursing school and just staying in Korea until spring semester in the hope that things clear up somewhat come 2021. The trend is definitely not in that direction at this point though.