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Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« on: May 22, 2020, 10:37:34 am »
Yo,

So some of your schools have already opened by now. My schools open next week and the following week. In anticipation of the rules regarding no groups activities and such, does anyone have any suggestions for the kinds of games and activities I can use in my classes that would still be effective? Bingo being an obvious one.

Kind Regards


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2020, 07:56:20 am »
I'd like to follow this thread for some ideas as well. I'm a bit worried as to how English camp will go since that is heavily interactive. I'm more worried that the students won't have fun. This is pretty sad tbh.

Anyways, some activities that I can only think of are bomb games, Bingo, and paper activities =.='

Just found another thread with some great ideas~

https://www.waygook.org/index.php?topic=119973.msg826476;topicseen#new
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 08:01:32 am by talk20gen »


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2020, 10:16:29 am »
I think PPT games are still possible in groups, as long as you don't move them into physical groups


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2020, 01:00:21 pm »
Yeah. As for PPT games, I think I have a solution. Imagine 5 rows or 5 students. Each row is a team. All students  individually write their answers on a piece of paper, 3,2,1 papers up. Then each student in the row (team) who is correct is a multiplier. Then we show the sore and calculate. So if 3 out of 5 were correct in that row (on that team), an the question was a 3 pointer, that team would receive 9 points...Just an idea anyhow, still waiting to test it.


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2020, 08:02:37 am »
I'd like to follow this thread for some ideas as well. I'm a bit worried as to how English camp will go since that is heavily interactive. I'm more worried that the students won't have fun. This is pretty sad tbh.

Anyways, some activities that I can only think of are bomb games, Bingo, and paper activities =.='

Just found another thread with some great ideas~

https://www.waygook.org/index.php?topic=119973.msg826476;topicseen#new

Nice, I didn't see that thread before so thanks for the link. Seems like PPT games is the way forward for the time being.


  • hangook77
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Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2020, 09:44:24 am »
Ask the schools to give the kids individual notebooks.  If doing jeopardy style game, each kid writes their answers on paper and keeps track of their own score.  Play pass the ball and let the music play for 30 seconds or so.  Then, take a popsicle stick, roll dice, use app, etc to call student number.  That student stands and answers the slide.  Telepathy and word lotto give the kid a sheet (or use notebook) to write the answers and keep track of their own score.  Some of the ppts like Lotto, Telepathy, Pass the Ball, Poop Game - Jeopardy - bomb game - etc can still be played just a bit differently. 

For Telepathy and Lotto, I included examples already on here. 


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2020, 10:06:24 am »
Kahoot! could be a good use at this time - as long as you are allowed to let your students use their phones during class time. Kahoot! was a website suggestion I saw a while back on here, when the online classes first started. You can create your own quiz/review questions and the kids answer via their cell phones. You have an option of doing the game player vs. player, so all kids would need their devices, or team vs team, so they share a device in one group - for this option you could have the kids in each team rotate who answers the next question so all students get a shot.

I honestly haven't really tried the site because I went in a different direction, but I'm looking into it as a review game option for my (middle school) G3 classes, which start back up tomorrow.

Again, though, the students would need to have at least one phone in each group for the concept to work.


  • Datasapien
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Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2020, 02:05:24 pm »
After the first couple of days of classes I've noticed there's a severe shortage of energy in the room now that I can't get the students into groups for games / up and out of their chairs for speaking activities. I think any amount of movement is better than nothing, so I'm going to try this simple activity with my middle schoolers next week.

https://www.funenglishgames.com/activities/rowsandcolumns.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLHQVDHipKU

I never finish anyth


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2020, 01:23:22 pm »
I've had some success with creating my own whiteboards (just laminating white pieces of paper), and using those for ppt games. With the new guidelines, there are now 5 rows of desks in each classroom, so I just make each row a team, and I make a different student in each team write the answer for each round or question. They can still get help from teammates by showing the students in front of or behind them their answers, then make corrections... although for low level students, the more advanced students have been writing the answers down on their "whiteboards" and allowing the lower level students to copy them, lol.

I've been giving them tissues to clean their whiteboards. And if your school is super strict about the sanitation guidelines, you can spray each whiteboard down with sanitizer and have each student wipe it down before they hand them back.


  • Mr C
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Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2020, 03:09:05 pm »
i certainly want to say I'm grateful for all the thoughts and suggestions being shared here.  But frankly, writing activities are not much of a struggle to come up with in these consditions.

What I'm struggling with is speaking activities for individuals and groups.  Usually quiz/"bomb" games allow teams to consult then answer aloud together.  What we're getting now is they each write their answer, share it, and then speak--the problem is that that's a writing activity.

I've got a "pass the ball" notion where the music plays then a "random number" pops up and the student with that number has to answer.  Give numbers by picking from bag, assigning by seat, etc. (I'll be doing this in my Open Class on Wednesday.)
Mr. C is not a bad person, in fact is quite a good person here. One of the best people on this forum if you really look at it
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  • shostager
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Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2020, 07:26:41 am »
I've got a "pass the ball" notion where the music plays then a "random number" pops up and the student with that number has to answer.  Give numbers by picking from bag, assigning by seat, etc. (I'll be doing this in my Open Class on Wednesday.)

I'm doing something similar, except the students call out each other's names to choose who has the "ball" next. Time's up, whoever's name was just called is the speaker. If it's a dialogue, I let that person choose their partner, too (they generally use this as revenge on whoever chose them, but it's all in good fun). I had one class that chose the same girl 3 times in a row, so the last time, I let her pick the two people doing the dialogue (not her), haha.

I've also been doing the "Hexagons" game, where I divide them into 2 teams based on student numbers, then choose one student from each team. Those two do RPS, winner answers and can take a space. I know it only ends up with one student talking at a time, but I let teams help each other, so there's usually a couple students who offer suggestions each round (I've been doing it where they have to make a past tense sentence with a word that starts with the letter in the hexagon, so they usually suggest those nouns).

If anyone has any other ideas for modified speaking games, I'd love to hear them too~


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2020, 02:38:19 pm »
Well, for speaking I've been playings games like 3 Kingdoms and Hot Seat. Students don't need to leave their seats for either game.

For 3 Kingdoms, for example, students must answer a question (i.e. respond to a question correctly) before they'll be permitted to invade a territory. If a territory is already occupied by another team, then one champion from each team must RPS for it. Invading teams take over the territory if they win RPS. Defending teams don't win anything but they also don't lose anything. Teams can only invade territories that are touching one of their own territories, and each team starts out with just one (their "home" territory). Teams can invade other teams' home territories if they can get close enough to them, but, if the invaders lose the RPS in that scenario, they also lose one of their own territories to the winning team. The team with the most territories by the end of class wins. 

For Hot Seat, I play normally, except I have the student in the "Hot Seat" facing away from the board or TV. Miming isn't as helpful doing it this way because students' team members are going to be seated all around them, and the guessing student isn't going to be able to turn around to look at anyone behind them, which could be a problem for really low-level students, but if your school will allow one student to come to the front of the class at a time, then you could do it that way, too. Anyway, their answer only counts if the student in the hot seat can use their word in one of the key expressions for the day, but as long as they can guess the word before the timer runs out I still give them a chance to put it into a sentence afterwards.

And I haven't tried this, yet, but I've been thinking about cutting up dialogues, and giving one student in each team one sentence from that dialogue. When I give them the go, they've got to determine the correct order of the dialogue (they can do this by reciting them to each other, and writing them down). If they think they've got the correct order, they can "ring the bell", at which point the whole class has to freeze. Then they have to recite their dialogue in the correct order (with each student reciting their portion of the dialogue). If they fail, the race is immediately on again. This repeats until one team finally manages to correctly recite its dialogue. To prevent any single team from constantly "ringing the bell" just to prevent other teams from being able to do so, they cannot ring the bell again for at least 20 seconds (as a penalty for getting the wrong answer). This is something I'll be testing with my more advanced classes first.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2020, 02:45:38 pm by Chinguetti »


  • Sames
  • Newgookin

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Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2020, 09:53:47 am »
As my school will be starting our in person English classes this week, I wanted to join this discussion and get everyone's input on how to maximize our efforts.
(These are just my thoughts so please feel free to disagree or offer alternative suggestions.)

I teach at an elementary school where students will only have one in person English class per week while continuing online classes. Of the four English learning skills (Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing), it seems speaking is the hardest to assess via online classes.  Reading and writing are easily checked with worksheets. Listening can be evaluated when combining a video or audio file with a worksheet. For the life of me I couldn't think of a way to assess students' speaking, short of asking them to record themselves and submit an audio file. This creates a lot of problems including the logistics of asking children to record and upload the files as well as asking a teacher to review potential hundreds of separate audio files.

For these reasons it seems that the in person classes should focus specifically on improving and evaluating the students speaking. I'll stop here for now as I would like to hear everyone's thoughts.


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #13 on: June 04, 2020, 06:15:41 pm »
Roleplay is a big one, and I've been trying to find new ways to incorporate it into my lesson that won't also end up ostracizing overly shy or special needs students, but I never spend a lot of time thinking about it because roleplaying is really boring for my students. It's only good for about 5 minutes max. I try to use it more as practice time for easing them into something more comprehensive and creative anyway.

I haven't really tried story-telling as a speaking activity before, only as reading and writing, so I might give it a shot this semester. Like I'll start off with something simple, as described in the following video, then go from there depending on how I see different students react to it and perform in general.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYfDFfmAufY
« Last Edit: June 04, 2020, 06:20:59 pm by Chinguetti »


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2020, 01:30:15 pm »
Kahoot! could be a good use at this time - as long as you are allowed to let your students use their phones during class time. Kahoot! was a website suggestion I saw a while back on here, when the online classes first started. You can create your own quiz/review questions and the kids answer via their cell phones. You have an option of doing the game player vs. player, so all kids would need their devices, or team vs team, so they share a device in one group - for this option you could have the kids in each team rotate who answers the next question so all students get a shot.
When I lived here before, kahoot was really hard to get set up with kids who were kind of low level, since there's no option for navigating the site in anything other than English.

But I've heard since being back here recently that it works okay with phone browsers that translate for you. YMMV


  • CMC2668
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Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2020, 02:01:55 pm »
There are some suggestions and links to resources for activities which you can do while social distancing. I hope it helps.
https://games4esl.com/social-distancing-classroom-games/


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2020, 08:02:29 pm »
Here's something I did recently:

I think this is really good for students around 3rd to 6th grade. I showed my students a video of bizarre hamburgers and pizzas and then asked them to make their own hamburger or pizza. I required them to make their own food, showing the steps using ordinal numbers, which I taught first, as well as focusing on adjectives/articles like a, an, and some.

My kids really seemed to like. I'd do this again.


  • Wlvers
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Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2020, 11:17:34 am »
I'm actually very concerned about this. My students are all sat at separate desks, not really allowed to interact together and I worry they're not talking enough. Furthermore, I worry I'm talking too much. I call on students but realistically can only interact with a small portion each lesson. It's really hard to see a way around it when I can't have peer-to-peer interaction, which I guess should be the cornerstone of an ESL classroom.

It's my first time teaching so I have no real reference for how things normally are. How much is everyone else's students talking?


Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #18 on: July 13, 2020, 11:58:40 am »
Yes, it is much harder this year.  Students are not doing as well overall as in previous years.  The higher level students are doing OK but the lower students are just missing out.

Normally students would be talking during group activities  and higher students would be 'helping' the lower students (some help more than others).  These days there is no pair work, no group work, no moving around the room and asking other students the same questions (developing fluency).  These days it feels as if we are just covering the material.  I don't know of anything we can do to help students learn and practice on their own.

These days there is little 'talking' in class - just 'listen and repeat', song/chant and choral talking.  There is a little individual  'question and answer' but the teacher is usually asking the questions and one student at  a time is answering.  I usually try to ask a question and have the whole class answer - their answer doesn't have to be the same as the other students.  But it isn't possible to hear and help all the students.

I am teaching elementary students (as you probably worked out by the song and chants reference).  We do get the students to practise on their own saying the mini dialogs (2 or 3 lines) and I roam the room listening to individual students and asking different students to read/say different parts.  I have noted on my seating chart who the lower students are and I try to make sure I am ready to help/prompt them.

Plus the lessons are 5 minutes shorter than normal.    Even less time for practising in class.  But I think that extra 5 minutes was used up by organising the students into groups/pairs etc!!!

This is not normal and it is not good learning but it is just the way it is at the moment.  Let's keep looking for ways to improve on it but don't feel too badly if/when we can't.  I am also quite concerned about it but we cannot force the students to speak and practise at home.  We can only do so much.


  • 303lmc
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Re: Suggestions for activities within restricted classrooms
« Reply #19 on: July 13, 2020, 12:20:00 pm »
Yes, it is much harder this year.  Students are not doing as well overall as in previous years.  The higher level students are doing OK but the lower students are just missing out.


These days there is little 'talking' in class - just 'listen and repeat', song/chant and choral talking.  There is a little individual  'question and answer' but the teacher is usually asking the questions and one student at  a time is answering.  I usually try to ask a question and have the whole class answer - their answer doesn't have to be the same as the other students.  But it isn't possible to hear and help all the students.


Yes, same here. we are sort of just blazing through the material and no real practice or talking. But I also don't know what they do in the online class. I do call each student for a 5 minute review session, but it's mostly listen and repeat. some students I ask other questions from past lessons. I'm gonna start bringing a ppt game for the friday class we have and sort of insist we play so they can try to have some 'fun'