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  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5232

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #360 on: October 08, 2020, 05:41:46 am »
You don't need 4 years to do a BA...you can do your BA in a year or two if you wish.

Not at an accredited American university. It's a ton of work to pass. Many fail out. Universities in the United States are ranked the highest in the world.

120 credits are needed for a BA. To take more than 15 credits per semester requires special permission (at the university I attended at least). Two semesters a year. 18 credits per semester would be a really heavy course load. So how's someone gonna graduate in a year?


  • 745sticky
  • Expert Waygook

    • 830

    • March 26, 2020, 01:52:57 pm
    • Korea
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #361 on: October 08, 2020, 07:52:23 am »
Not at an accredited American university. It's a ton of work to pass. Many fail out. Universities in the United States are ranked the highest in the world.

120 credits are needed for a BA. To take more than 15 credits per semester requires special permission (at the university I attended at least). Two semesters a year. 18 credits per semester would be a really heavy course load. So how's someone gonna graduate in a year?

My college had trimesters


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1415

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #362 on: October 08, 2020, 08:11:39 am »
Not at an accredited American university. It's a ton of work to pass. Many fail out. Universities in the United States are ranked the highest in the world.

120 credits are needed for a BA. To take more than 15 credits per semester requires special permission (at the university I attended at least). Two semesters a year. 18 credits per semester would be a really heavy course load. So how's someone gonna graduate in a year?
In most North American universities, one can take courses in the interm sessions (periods between semesters).


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5232

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #363 on: October 08, 2020, 11:25:47 am »
Whatís the largest amount of credits one could take in a year? It ainít 120; therefore, it canít be done in a year.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1415

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #364 on: October 08, 2020, 11:40:06 am »
18 credits a semester twice a year (I've never heard about needing permission to do more than 15 a semester! As most 3rd and 4th year courses are 4 credits, that would limit one to only 4 or maybe 5 courses per semester, which is slacker speed), plus 12 credits per intersession also twice a year is about 60 credits a year. So 2 years is probably the absolute minimum...
... unless you've already done a substantial number of courses via AP, as many posters here have apparently done.

Also, it would depend on one's major. Trying to do 60 credits a year in an engineering program would probably kill you (and if you survived, it would prepare you fairly well for your life as a comp engineer lol)


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5232

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #365 on: October 08, 2020, 11:47:50 am »
The problem with AP courses is most universities donít accept them, and even if they do, not all will transfer, only a portion.


  • shostager
  • Super Waygook

    • 337

    • November 06, 2012, 06:08:10 am
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #366 on: October 08, 2020, 11:54:56 am »
The problem with AP courses is most universities donít accept them, and even if they do, not all will transfer, only a portion.

There are more options than AP though, depending on your school. My high school also offered dual enrollment, where you could physically go to the college and take actual courses there, if you got permission and worked out the schedule (I had a friend that did this). They also had a course or two that were worth college credits, but were taught in the high school (eg. Spanish). I also did a math program where I blasted through all my high school math in middle school (classes taught on the weekends at the university). If I had continued (I failed the test to do so), I could have done what another girl in my class did, which was rack up college math credits while in high school.

Of course, those credits might not have transferred to another college, but if you went straight to the college you got the credits from, you kept them. The math and Spanish credits my school offered were through the local state college's 4-year program, so pretty decent (dual enrollment depended on what scheduling/travel you could figure out).

In case anyone is curious about some of the programs:
- UMTYMP: University of Minnesota Talented Youth Mathematics Program (take weekend classes on campus, get college credit)
- CIS: College in the Schools (take classes physically in your high school, get college credit for them) - also run by U of M, idk if anywhere else does it
« Last Edit: October 08, 2020, 12:04:12 pm by shostager »


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1415

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #367 on: October 08, 2020, 11:57:43 am »
The problem with AP courses is most universities donít accept them, and even if they do, not all will transfer, only a portion.
Mine all did, and I went to one of the big name unis. *shrug*
But then, Commonwealth unis don't restrict AP credits  (as much) because they aren't quite as for-profit as American ones.  :sad:
« Last Edit: October 08, 2020, 12:00:13 pm by Kyndo »


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4226

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #368 on: October 08, 2020, 02:11:43 pm »
Not at an accredited American university. It's a ton of work to pass. Many fail out. Universities in the United States are ranked the highest in the world.

120 credits are needed for a BA. To take more than 15 credits per semester requires special permission (at the university I attended at least). Two semesters a year. 18 credits per semester would be a really heavy course load. So how's someone gonna graduate in a year?

Most definitely at an accredited university.

In addition to my ex gf's mother and her 18 month PhD at Warwick uni...i have a family member who completed their chemical engineering BSc at Nottingham uni also in 18 months.

There was also a Russian lad at my uni, on my course who finished his BSc in 18 months.

These people do exist...credits are essentially coursework and exams. Someone who's very advanced at a young age doesn't necessarily need to go through an entire semester of lectures, they could probably just do the exams and coursework without attabding a bulk of the lectures.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5232

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #369 on: October 08, 2020, 02:19:27 pm »
I'm not familiar with Commonwealth unis; might be possible there. In an American uni though, no. That's what I was speaking about.


  • 745sticky
  • Expert Waygook

    • 830

    • March 26, 2020, 01:52:57 pm
    • Korea
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #370 on: October 08, 2020, 03:28:05 pm »
I'm not familiar with Commonwealth unis; might be possible there. In an American uni though, no. That's what I was speaking about.

...but it is possible in an American uni.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5232

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #371 on: October 08, 2020, 03:30:51 pm »
To get a BA in one year? No, it's not.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1415

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #372 on: October 08, 2020, 03:46:10 pm »
LI, several different people have provided insight on how it might be done.
I think it would only be fair to provide you the opportunity to explain why, in your opinion, their insight and first hand experiences are wrong.  :smiley:


Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #373 on: October 08, 2020, 03:59:24 pm »
In the last 10 years there have been more and more opportunities for high school and middle school students to get ahead in their coursework. Dual enrollment is becoming more popular among high school students and more programs and schools are being developed to cater to such students. I went to a collegiate high school, where I took my almost 60 credits of college courses in high school. My high school was on a college campus and I designed my own schedule. The only high school courses I took during that entire time included PE, 1 high school science course, and journalism. The rest were all college courses that counted for both high school and college credit. I did not graduate with my Associate's degree at the same time I graduated high school, but many of my friends did. If those individuals were to go into university and take full, or more than full, course schedules for Fall, Spring, and both summer sessions they could finish in 1 year....at an American university. Assuming the individual graduated with exactly 60 credits, took 15 each semester.....that equals enough to graduate....lab classes, language classes, music classes and more often count for more than 3 credits.....that does not even include any possible break sessions. My university didn't have break sessions that I can remember, but many universities do.

Also, speaking on the age of the person.....there are plenty of hard-working and smart children who we hear stories about....graduating college by 15 or 16.....they had to skip and clear many obstacles to do it, but they did it....


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 2143

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #374 on: October 16, 2020, 11:47:23 am »
Not at an accredited American university. It's a ton of work to pass. Many fail out. Universities in the United States are ranked the highest in the world.

120 credits are needed for a BA. To take more than 15 credits per semester requires special permission (at the university I attended at least). Two semesters a year. 18 credits per semester would be a really heavy course load. So how's someone gonna graduate in a year?

I heard of some High Schools doubling up in the US with uni credits.  But still experimental? 

Some folks have gone to 2 year college and transferred credits over to uni and did uni the last two years.  They had both an associates degree and a uni degree at the end of the 4 years. 


  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1906

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #375 on: October 16, 2020, 12:55:36 pm »
When I started university quite a few of my classmates had graduated high school in a full IB program. According to them they were able to get credit for a bunch of first-year course, but chose not to so they could boost their grades in order to get into the program of their choice in second, or third year. They said a lot of the material was mostly review for them, while everything was new to me.


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 4322

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #376 on: October 18, 2020, 08:43:44 pm »
Just saw this beauty:

One of our teachers has an emergency situation. We need a substitute Dec. 1-23. (17 working days/ NO weekends)

Hours: 9-6 (kinder/elem)
Location: Seongdonggu, Seoul
Pay: 1.5 million won (no accommodation provided)
Lunch: Provided everyday by school
Co-teacher: yes
Class size: 11 (all age 6) elem: varies
Lesson plan provided & prepared

Atmosphere: We are a small school located in Seoul. We teach different curriculums such as art, p.e, science. You will have support from the coteacher and foreign staff. There are (40 min) breaks throughout the day for planning time.

Contact me for questions.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1415

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #377 on: October 19, 2020, 08:15:56 am »
That comes out to 9,804 won per hour, which is only slightly higher than the current minimum wage (8,704 won/hour).  :huh:


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4226

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: It is 2003, again!
« Reply #378 on: October 20, 2020, 02:17:10 pm »
3D jobs have all but surpassed E-2 jobs.

It's not even a contest anymore.


  • Getsome
  • Adventurer

    • 31

    • October 09, 2020, 11:41:58 pm
    • UK
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 03:16:14 am by Getsome »