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  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4703

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #60 on: April 06, 2020, 01:46:52 pm »
The city of Ansan, where more than 11 percent of its population are foreign residents, is the only municipality giving out cash payouts to foreigners, regardless of whether they are married to Korean nationals. It offers 100,000 won to Koreans and 70,000 won to foreign nationals.


Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #61 on: April 06, 2020, 06:51:54 pm »
I'm guessing you're a Berniebro.

:P
And I'm a Trumper. Tyler has more sense than you do.


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1609

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #62 on: April 08, 2020, 10:07:39 am »
100,000 is $80.

Only if you're American.  Canucks would get $115 or so.  (Why Americans stay here with that rate....)


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1609

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #63 on: April 08, 2020, 10:24:54 am »
Exit plan.  This.

Imagine putting yourself in the shoes of a Korean teacher.  Think about it.  Most of them do not wake up in the morning and go to work thinking, this might be my last semester
or year.  No.  They wake up knowing that they are locked into this career until retirement if they want as long as they stay out of trouble and do what is required as a teacher.  They
are all thinking long-term, long-term benefits/pay increase tremendously, and the incentive to teach for 35 or 45 years in the school system is massive.

But for NETs, we understand that we are only guest teachers.  So, our survival and mindset is completely different.  We are constantly thinking this could be my last year.
What will I do next year? Where will I go?  What are my long-term plans? There is no security and no long-term benefits.  The longer you stay, the same pay or even less you get.
You don't get the same perks as Korean teachers do.

That's why I noticed that Korean teachers are very obedient and very scared all the time to not break any rules or policies.  For them their entire career is at stake if they mess up.
The authority figures have more power and leverage over the teachers knowing that their entire career and future hinges on every single moment and work day.  So that's why they are so obedient and straight as an arrow.  I could see and hear the fear in my korean teachers eyes and voices when they talk to their principals or vps making sure they keep the rest of their future intact and inline.   Any slip up and you could jeopardize your career and say bye-bye.  Even principals and vps get scared and worried when they are contacted by education ministry or other higher ups.  I know this personally because I went through something like this where "outside" higher ups had to contact our school about something that I did or requested and it scared the heck out of my school.

As for NETs, we aren't governed by the same motivation.  NETs will try their best to respect all the rules and policies but the reality is, we're goners anyways so we take more risks, we take more chances and not afraid to say or do things that might ruffle feathers and cost us our job.  NETs don't have that built-in "my entire career hinges on this" moment per se.   We are like ticking timebombs knowing that at any moment, we could be gone, we could be out of the country, we could be looking back at this lifestyle as a long distant memory of our past.  It's kinda sad.

So, yes, I feel sorry for the new teachers who come with wide eyes and innocence thinking they just landed a career in english teaching and became english teachers....really, we are not real teachers here.  You have to find an exit plan for yourself and be prepared.  Some may end up staying in Korea for life and making this your career, sure! Not saying that isn't possible.  But most won't.  Most will be here or at least teaching as only temporary and you have to have an exit plan and be ready (maybe open up a cafe/bar/fried chicken joint) because unlike the Korean teachers who are locked in for life and have all the benefits laid out before them to strive for.....you as a NET have nothing to strive for except the next paycheck everything after that is cloud of uncertainty.

In an ideal world, we would always want our employers to take care of us and invest in us and then perhaps we would invest more back into them.  But the reality is nobody really cares about you and when you are out of a job, nobody is going to take care of you.   You have to take care of yourself.  That's not being selfish.  It's being smart.  I didn't make up the rules of the game. That's just unfortunately how it is. 


You definitely have to be prepared for plan B.  You could stay for years or be dropped like a hot potato.  If you stay abroad in esl for years and decades, be ready with a pension.  Either working in a country where you pay into one for 10 or 15 years or save money up for one.  Maybe work at home for a time too.  After that, you can hit countries without one. 

Most don't let foreigners get a pension.  Even Taiwan doesn't and it's a developed country.  China, Vietnam, you're out of luck.  But, there are some places like here that do if you pay into it for 10 years.  If you do stay abroad for years, don't cash it out and country or job hop.  People say they can get more money in the market investing, but then they never actually invest. 

Public school as long as you can renew your contract gives some semi stability as they leave you alone outside of working time and won't fire you at a moment's notice.  But if you know what you are doing and have some type of experience or training, you can land on your feet and make some decent coin.


  • T.J.
  • Veteran

    • 215

    • June 09, 2011, 11:07:16 am
    • 서울 은평구 연신내
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #64 on: April 08, 2020, 02:13:46 pm »
Only if you're American.  Canucks would get $115 or so.  (Why Americans stay here with that rate....)

Because to some that stay here x Won = x Won.
"An ignorant person is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."

"Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock."

-Will Rogers


  • tylerthegloob
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1208

    • September 28, 2016, 10:46:24 am
    • Busan
    more
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #65 on: April 08, 2020, 03:23:51 pm »
i hope that x Won = x Won to everyone...


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1707

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #66 on: April 09, 2020, 09:00:29 am »
Only if you're American.  Canucks would get $115 or so.  (Why Americans stay here with that rate....)

as a NZer, I get about $137 per 100,000won, before any fees and stuff :D


  • T.J.
  • Veteran

    • 215

    • June 09, 2011, 11:07:16 am
    • 서울 은평구 연신내
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #67 on: April 09, 2020, 08:32:45 pm »
Koreans as we all know they are culturally retarded when it comes to common sense and good hygiene.  They may pretend to put on a good show for the cameras, but when the world is not looking, they will revert back to their usual ways and kill a significant number of themselves off 


Your use of the word here is confusing because you aren’t here in Korea but rather there in Canada. How’s it going there in Canada by the way?
"An ignorant person is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."

"Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock."

-Will Rogers


  • KoreaBoo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 582

    • May 25, 2014, 04:00:42 pm
    • Vancouver Island
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #68 on: April 10, 2020, 12:35:16 am »
This is for public school teachers

How long can this go on?

How long can they pay us?

When will we be defined as "non-essential?"

Gyeonggi government wants to give all Korean residents 100 000 won

If this school year goes further than April 6th...... Will we be viable?

Giving 100k won to residents is more an insult than any form of real relief. 

What can you actually do with 100k won that will have any real impact? 

At least in NA they are offering thousands a month to mitigate any financial impact from a loss of income.  That has some real value.  How a gov't can offer nearly nothing and act so magnanimous about it is really telling.  The fact there are people who are complaining and protesting because they are not receiving such a small amount is just sad on so many levels.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1752

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #69 on: April 10, 2020, 03:06:28 am »
100k can buy enough food to live a month or two.

For the many elderly living on their own it means the world.


  • KoreaBoo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 582

    • May 25, 2014, 04:00:42 pm
    • Vancouver Island
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #70 on: April 10, 2020, 05:56:52 am »
100k can buy enough food to live a month or two.

For the many elderly living on their own it means the world.

Dog food perhaps.   It's sad and shameful you feel this is acceptable.


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1870

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #71 on: April 10, 2020, 06:06:08 am »
The elderly and low income will get additional government subsidies. About 400k to 1million depending on family size. Not sure when it will get distributed.

http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/pages/article.asp?newsIdx=287314
« Last Edit: April 10, 2020, 07:42:13 am by thunderlips »


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1707

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #72 on: April 10, 2020, 09:02:31 am »
100k can buy enough food to live a month or two.

For the many elderly living on their own it means the world.

I'm not sure I could do that, unless I had to. I spend about that much per week on food.


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5818

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #73 on: April 10, 2020, 09:28:02 am »
When I was a uni student, I budgeted $35 a week for food. That was super bare-bones. Given where I lived, it would be hard for a single person to spend less on food without risking health issues.
Anyway, as a result, I still can't bring myself to eat ramen, no matter how much I pretty it up...
Also, this was, like, a gazillion years ago, so in current dollars that would be about... $52.81.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2020, 09:29:56 am by kyndo »


  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5642

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #74 on: April 10, 2020, 09:55:11 am »
Anyway, as a result, I still can't bring myself to eat ramen, no matter how much I pretty it up...

I can't enjoy popcorn anymore. I worked at cinemas for 7 years and those last couple of days before payday? You know the ones where you went to a concert and a bar the weekend before and dropped 200$?  That was survival mode and I'd eat free popcorn with "butter topping" (legal name) and some seaosning packets. (White cheddar, ketchup, dill pickle, salt and vinegar).

Reminds me of scraping by. Never again.
레새 뭐 페르, 커나르드. 에스티 타베르낰 트루 드 볘르즈.


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1870

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #75 on: April 10, 2020, 10:01:42 am »
I can't enjoy popcorn anymore. I worked at cinemas for 7 years and those last couple of days before payday? You know the ones where you went to a concert and a bar the weekend before and dropped 200$?  That was survival mode and I'd eat free popcorn with "butter topping" (legal name) and some seaosning packets. (White cheddar, ketchup, dill pickle, salt and vinegar).

Reminds me of scraping by. Never again.

I can't even smell Jagermeister without getting nauseous.


  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5642

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #76 on: April 10, 2020, 10:04:36 am »
I can't even smell Jagermeister without getting nauseous.

Southern Comfort when it comes to booze. Got really drunk at a scout camp and ended up in the hospital.
레새 뭐 페르, 커나르드. 에스티 타베르낰 트루 드 볘르즈.


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1870

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #77 on: April 10, 2020, 10:11:32 am »
Southern Comfort when it comes to booze. Got really drunk at a scout camp and ended up in the hospital.

Hopefully they prosecuted your scout master. :D


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1609

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #78 on: April 10, 2020, 10:23:03 am »
Exit plan.  This.

Imagine putting yourself in the shoes of a Korean teacher.  Think about it.  Most of them do not wake up in the morning and go to work thinking, this might be my last semester
or year.  No.  They wake up knowing that they are locked into this career until retirement if they want as long as they stay out of trouble and do what is required as a teacher.  They
are all thinking long-term, long-term benefits/pay increase tremendously, and the incentive to teach for 35 or 45 years in the school system is massive.

But for NETs, we understand that we are only guest teachers.  So, our survival and mindset is completely different.  We are constantly thinking this could be my last year.
What will I do next year? Where will I go?  What are my long-term plans? There is no security and no long-term benefits.  The longer you stay, the same pay or even less you get.
You don't get the same perks as Korean teachers do.

That's why I noticed that Korean teachers are very obedient and very scared all the time to not break any rules or policies.  For them their entire career is at stake if they mess up.
The authority figures have more power and leverage over the teachers knowing that their entire career and future hinges on every single moment and work day.  So that's why they are so obedient and straight as an arrow.  I could see and hear the fear in my korean teachers eyes and voices when they talk to their principals or vps making sure they keep the rest of their future intact and inline.   Any slip up and you could jeopardize your career and say bye-bye.  Even principals and vps get scared and worried when they are contacted by education ministry or other higher ups.  I know this personally because I went through something like this where "outside" higher ups had to contact our school about something that I did or requested and it scared the heck out of my school.

As for NETs, we aren't governed by the same motivation.  NETs will try their best to respect all the rules and policies but the reality is, we're goners anyways so we take more risks, we take more chances and not afraid to say or do things that might ruffle feathers and cost us our job.  NETs don't have that built-in "my entire career hinges on this" moment per se.   We are like ticking timebombs knowing that at any moment, we could be gone, we could be out of the country, we could be looking back at this lifestyle as a long distant memory of our past.  It's kinda sad.

So, yes, I feel sorry for the new teachers who come with wide eyes and innocence thinking they just landed a career in english teaching and became english teachers....really, we are not real teachers here.  You have to find an exit plan for yourself and be prepared.  Some may end up staying in Korea for life and making this your career, sure! Not saying that isn't possible.  But most won't.  Most will be here or at least teaching as only temporary and you have to have an exit plan and be ready (maybe open up a cafe/bar/fried chicken joint) because unlike the Korean teachers who are locked in for life and have all the benefits laid out before them to strive for.....you as a NET have nothing to strive for except the next paycheck everything after that is cloud of uncertainty.

In an ideal world, we would always want our employers to take care of us and invest in us and then perhaps we would invest more back into them.  But the reality is nobody really cares about you and when you are out of a job, nobody is going to take care of you.   You have to take care of yourself.  That's not being selfish.  It's being smart.  I didn't make up the rules of the game. That's just unfortunately how it is. 


This ain't the plum job it once was.  Go back 12 or 15 years, when Korea was poorer, ajossis were more all powerful, and people were more scared.  (Men teachers and education officials could and did make sex jokes and women didn't like them but had to endure.)  The salary compared to the low cost of living was quite high to start.  AT the time, a man had to have a minimum salary of 1.5 million for a woman to consider marrying him.  Minimum wage was around 600,000 a month more or less.  Teachers who were young started at 1,8 million and got bonuses twice a year.  Outside of Seoul or a major city, they, along with other government workers, were the cream of the crop and much more highly paid.  But, people also had to kowtow to arrogant screaming bosses (sometimes).  But, they also got more respect from society.  Their monthly salaries automatically increased by 100,000 a month per year. 

Fast forward many years later.  Minimum wage is almost the teachers minimum salary.  An acceptable salary for marriage is probably double now?  (Though most Korean women don't have the same mindset like they did years ago or at least to the same degree about wanting rich oppa.  So, that is less of an issue than in the past.)  The teacher's salary is the same starting out.  It still starts at 1.8 and goes up 100k every year.  Their total bonuses are about 40% more than ours in total.  (Ours is the 2 million won renewal allowance.) 

Nowadays, most younger teachers are poor or heavily in debt.  Even two younger teachers marrying who have been working for a few years are having a hard time.  They can't buy an apartment like before or if they do go into debt much more.  (Maybe less parent buying than before?)  But, many will drive a nice car but be in debt to their eyeballs.  Especially true for those slightly older in their 30's or 40's.  Some are driving BMW's, etc.  But even a fully loaded Hyundai Santa Fe with all the bells and whistles is 40 million won or so. 

On the other hand, more women are in management positions, more supervisors, principals, etc than before.  Men teachers or officials nowadays are very careful what they would say to a female worker.  Women who have babies are given more consideration like leave time, and leave work early to breast feed, etc.  Some aspects are easier.  People don't scream and yell much anymore and rage like older generation ajossis did.  But, parents and kids have a lot less respect towards teachers.  Heck years ago, in my rural town, when I first started teaching, I got awe from some people when they saw I was a public school teacher and not a hakwon teacher.  A few parents even bowed to me on the street when some kids introduced me as their teacher.  Korean teachers got this even more.  Not now.

I think other civil servants may be on a similar pay scale now also?  Both the foreign and Korean teachers in the schools are having a tough time money wise.  But, I also think a Korean teacher a young one may have less to lose.  I knew a girl who worked some government with a screaming dick of a boss and she just quit and had enough.  When they dangled huge amounts of money over you, I guess you put up with it more?  (Same salary much cheaper living cost and a still poor country outside of Seoul and a few big cities then.) 

In some ways more strict with certain rules now and folks are afraid of small deviations unlike the past where some rules were more "flexible", but on the whole, Korea is much more professional than before.  But the teachers starting now have a lot less financial incentive now than they would have 12 to 15 years ago. 


  • Lazio
  • Super Waygook

    • 315

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: How long do you think we got?
« Reply #79 on: April 10, 2020, 10:46:47 am »
Giving 100k won to residents is more an insult than any form of real relief. 

What can you actually do with 100k won that will have any real impact? 

At least in NA they are offering thousands a month to mitigate any financial impact from a loss of income.  That has some real value.  How a gov't can offer nearly nothing and act so magnanimous about it is really telling.  The fact there are people who are complaining and protesting because they are not receiving such a small amount is just sad on so many levels.

You should get familiar with the details before writing something ignorant. Not sure about other parts of the country but in Gyeonggi, residents will get support from 3 sources: their city, the government of Gyeonggi and the central government. The latter is not for everyone but the lower 70% so basically everyone in need of it will get it. For a family of four, these together will add up to 1.6 million - 1.8 million. If they are in the lower 70%, of course.
Most cities give out either 50k or 100k. Some even more but I didn't calculate with that.
The 100k is not significant, more like a gesture. The mayor of Gyeonggi has been supporting the idea of a basic disaster income from the beginning. The government wasn't on board at first. So Gyeonggi started the ball rolling by offering 100k to all citizens. Soon, cities followed and finally the central government as well.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2020, 10:56:17 am by Lazio »