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  • mi1990
  • Newgookin

    • 3

    • February 26, 2020, 04:09:26 pm
    • Seongnam-si
Part Time Contract Help
« on: February 26, 2020, 04:58:16 pm »
Hello all,

I am currently on and F-6 visa and recently just moved to Korea via Japan where i was teaching ESL for 3 years to children and adults. I currently have other commitments which i need to attend to in the up coming months and I was floating around looking for part time work hoping it would be flexible.

I have recently just had an offer (via a recruiter) for a kindergarten Hagwon for 10 hours a week 1 million KRW per month (not bad I guess). However there are some parts of the contract i feel are sketchy and are making me reluctant to sign. For example:

1. Because of my other commitments (not to disclose) I will need to take time off as this is a non negotiable situation (2 days in the month of march). I explained this during the interview, however I got the feeling they didn't understand or rather didn't want to know regarding my situation. In the end they "agreed to" what I explained, however I get a funny feeling that once the day comes, they could go back on their word. (as I have read on many different situations on the net)

2. The Employee is required to go through an orientation and training program and to attend staff meetings and workshops, which are not held during working hours, however this will not be considered as working overtime[/i]. I do get the fact that training is unpaid however I explained that I will not be able to attend in the morning as I am currently going to language school.

3. If the Employee wants to resign before the end of the employment period, the Employee must give a two month notice before and work until the Employer hires a new employee. Two months notice period and even if they haven't found someone, I still have to continue? This baffles me as the places I have worked at in Japan have been maximum 30 days notice. Due to the fact that I have had such good work relations with my higher ups in Japan, I gave the 6 weeks. However 2 months seems very over the top. What worries me with this, is the fact I have heard stories that companies can sue and try and squeeze as much money out of the teacher as possible. If to say for instance, I need to return home for family issues, then I feel that 2 months notice is very excessive especially for a part time position i believe.

4. There is no mention of holiday or vacation in the contract. Now, before people say because I am part time, I did inquire about when the school would close for summer and how this would affect me. They stated "My salary is worked out on an hourly rota (despite the contract saying i get a fixed salary) so I would not get paid for the days the school is shut." in other words force unpaid leave. This raised a lot of questions that were causally dismissed.

This is the second part time contract that has been offered to me where the money involved is good. However, the terms and conditions of the contract really beg the questions of whether i should sign this contract or not. I had already rejected one contract that wanted 90 days notice, and reduction of pay if I was unable to work. (so not unpaid leave, but unpaid and reduced on the hours I was suppose to work)

I guess there are two parts to my post:

1. Do you the job that I have been offered is despite the conditions that I have mentioned is worth is or am I being too nit picky?

2. I am quite surprised at the lack of flexibility and level of strictness despite these jobs being part time.

Let me know what you think and if you have any advice or experience regarding this, feel free to post.

Thanks a lot.


Re: Part Time Contract Help
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2020, 10:17:05 pm »
I just rejected a job for 8 hours a week for 1.5. I'm pretty much in the same boat as you though.  I have told lots of schools lately to buzz off. I wouldn't accept having to give 2 months notice either. I am aiming to get 50k per hour. The job you mentioned is 25k an hour. They were already lowballing you.


  • mi1990
  • Newgookin

    • 3

    • February 26, 2020, 04:09:26 pm
    • Seongnam-si
Re: Part Time Contract Help
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2020, 10:26:16 pm »
I just rejected a job for 8 hours a week for 1.5. I'm pretty much in the same boat as you though.  I have told lots of schools lately to buzz off. I wouldn't accept having to give 2 months notice either. I am aiming to get 50k per hour. The job you mentioned is 25k an hour. They were already lowballing you.
Thanks for your reply and it's relieved to hear that it's not just me.

The previous job offer was 2m for 15 hours a week which wasn't too bad but the contract conditions were questionable such as reduction in paid if you missed a day (and I don't mean unpaid leave) plus 90 days notice if you wish to quit. The more interesting thing is that they increased the salary once they reposted the job.

I guess I will just keep looking around and hoping to find something along the way.


Re: Part Time Contract Help
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2020, 10:15:03 am »
90 days notice is laughable. I made a thread a few days ago and the contract stated that they could fire me any time but I would have to give them a months notice. They were offering 1.5 for only 8 hours of work a week. I sent a message and reminding her of labor law etc. Even though the pay was good I'm not going to set myself up to be exploited or disrespected.  You have to be firm with these people or they will exploit you. I see people all the time that take the first or second contract they are offered. This is a recipe for disaster in Korea and will ensure that you are always working the bare minimum. I think that when it's time to find a job you have to weed through at bare minimum several dozen job prospects.


Re: Part Time Contract Help
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2020, 10:31:50 am »
Hello all,


I have recently just had an offer (via a recruiter) for a kindergarten Hagwon for 10 hours a week 1 million KRW per month (not bad I guess).

>> you are Statutory Part time under the Korean Labor Standards Act, in Korean it is call "extreme part time", but since you work less than 15 hours a week the protections you get are for that category of Employee.  The Statutory Part  Time Employee is where an Employee works 15 hours or less per week AVERAGED over the last three months of Employment.  Which means if you work more, then your status will change and allow you to have the full protections of the Korean Labor Standards Act.  It is very important you keep track of your time, it is in your best interests.


2. The Employee is required to go through an orientation and training program and to attend staff meetings and workshops, which are not held during working hours, however this will not be considered as working overtime[/i]. I do get the fact that training is unpaid however I explained that I will not be able to attend in the morning as I am currently going to language school.
>> Actually, you are to be paid, by law regardless of what category of employee you are in Korea, for time you spend at the direction of your Employer.  Really, it is best to simply note the date, the amount of time, take some photos, and then at the end of the term of employment you can get the money by requesting unpaid wages.  So simply ensure you have a record of your time and then LATER you can get paid for your time.

3. If the Employee wants to resign before the end of the employment period, the Employee must give a two month notice before and work until the Employer hires a new employee. Two months notice period and even if they haven't found someone, I still have to continue? This baffles me as the places I have worked at in Japan have been maximum 30 days notice. Due to the fact that I have had such good work relations with my higher ups in Japan, I gave the 6 weeks. However 2 months seems very over the top. What worries me with this, is the fact I have heard stories that companies can sue and try and squeeze as much money out of the teacher as possible. If to say for instance, I need to return home for family issues, then I feel that 2 months notice is very excessive especially for a part time position i believe.

>> Employees simply have to give written notice, or verbal really, with 0 days.  The only party that has the obligation to provide any notice is the Employer.  They must provide a written signed letter that states the date of termination which must be 30 days AFTER the employee receives the Letter of Termination.  So it was give Jan 1st, it would come into effect Jan 31st, if the Employer say "... it's Jan 30.." then it is called termination without Notice and the Employer will have to pay 30 days of wages, which is about 134% of the Salary in most contracts.

Since you are part time you do not have that protect of the 30 days notice, at the same time you do not have to give more than written notice.

4. There is no mention of holiday or vacation in the contract. Now, before people say because I am part time, I did inquire about when the school would close for summer and how this would affect me. They stated "My salary is worked out on an hourly rota (despite the contract saying i get a fixed salary) so I would not get paid for the days the school is shut." in other words force unpaid leave. This raised a lot of questions that were causally dismissed.
>> You do not receive Annual Paid Leave, overtime only if you work over 40 hours per week (other teaching contracts are 30 hours per week), you do not receive Health or Pension.  Health is changing and you since your employer is not responsible to make any payment to health insurance you will have to pay for it by your self, they are/have introduce law to make the minimum contribution something like 110$ or 150$ per month (you can check on the NHIS Website here: https://www.nhis.or.kr/static/html/wbd/g/a/wbdga0604.html



This is the second part time contract that has been offered to me where the money involved is good. However, the terms and conditions of the contract really beg the questions of whether i should sign this contract or not. I had already rejected one contract that wanted 90 days notice, and reduction of pay if I was unable to work. (so not unpaid leave, but unpaid and reduced on the hours I was suppose to work)

>> do not worry about the notice, there is no penalty to you in Korea if you do not give notice.  The supreme court has ruled in 2008 that any contract with any type of Penalty for an Employee if they quit is a violation of the Labor Standards Act, Article 20

".....In addition, in cases where the employee has to return his/her wages that would have paid to
the employee simply because the employee resigns prior to the previously agreed end-of-
service date, such provision of the employment contract violates the purpose of the above
Article and will not be deemed valid.  ....."

If you PM me I can send you the Legal Opinion.

I guess there are two parts to my post:

1. Do you the job that I have been offered is despite the conditions that I have mentioned is worth is or am I being too nit picky?

>> F-6, you can take job and then quit when you find a better job without penalty.

2. I am quite surprised at the lack of flexibility and level of strictness despite these jobs being part time.

>> There are not really many part time jobs in Education, there is an industry when if you register you can be tutor and go to Students houses to tutor, which is really the "part time job" in the field of Education in Korea, but you should register with the local Gu office and as a business.

Let me know what you think and if you have any advice or experience regarding this, feel free to post.

Thanks a lot.