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Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #20 on: December 09, 2019, 02:53:53 pm »
I made a general knowledge quiz, just to see what my students know, and was surprised that at least a few kids in every class could name Bob Ross.
One of the other things in the quiz was a picture of floppy disks, and not a single student knew what those were. The first thing they guessed was "post-it notes?"
Someone 3D printed the "save" icon!

 :laugh:

Every day, I walk in the class and say 'Wazzup' as loud as possible.

No reaction.

Wazzup with these kids?

Seriously. 



  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

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    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #21 on: December 10, 2019, 07:39:34 am »
I made a general knowledge quiz, just to see what my students know, and was surprised that at least a few kids in every class could name Bob Ross.
One of the other things in the quiz was a picture of floppy disks, and not a single student knew what those were. The first thing they guessed was "post-it notes?"
Someone 3D printed the "save" icon!

 :laugh:

Every day, I walk in the class and say 'Wazzup' as loud as possible.

No reaction.

Wazzup with these kids?

Seriously. 


I always start the day with "How art thou" and the kids don't get it.


Am I that old?
The first thing to say is that this is definitely not pyramid selling, OK?


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #22 on: December 10, 2019, 08:30:38 am »
I made a general knowledge quiz, just to see what my students know, and was surprised that at least a few kids in every class could name Bob Ross.
One of the other things in the quiz was a picture of floppy disks, and not a single student knew what those were. The first thing they guessed was "post-it notes?"
Someone 3D printed the "save" icon!

 :laugh:

Every day, I walk in the class and say 'Wazzup' as loud as possible.

No reaction.

Wazzup with these kids?

Seriously. 


I always start the day with "How art thou" and the kids don't get it.


Am I that old?

I did a bomb game with my elementary first-grade open class and the first question was...

Quote
1.  What does 'Celeritas et veritas' mean?

*silence*

Minsu:  '셀러리 싫어'  *starts laughing*

Me:  Booyah!  Minsu's always on it! 

Minsu:  뭐?

Me:  You've been great.  I'm here all week guys!  *drops the PPT pointer and rocks out of the classroom*

At least one gets it!!  No Minsu?  I'm fooked.


  • Kyndo
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    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
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Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #23 on: December 10, 2019, 08:52:43 am »
In veritate, it sounds like your bomb game bombed pretty celeriter.
 :laugh:


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #24 on: December 10, 2019, 09:22:55 am »
In veritate, it sounds like your bomb game bombed pretty celeriter.
 :laugh:

Et tu, Brute?

As is oft heard in some kindergartens in Gangwon-do. 


  • Kyndo
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Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #25 on: December 10, 2019, 09:30:58 am »
Et tu, Brute?

As is oft heard in some kindergartens in Gangwon-do. 

    This reminds me of the advert that the school my sister worked at in Taiwan put out a few years ago. It was set in a dimly lit concert hall, had classical music playing softly in the background, and a few of the little tykes dressed up to the nines dramatically reciting Shakespeare to the camera.
   Cue my sister, who heaped praise at their amazing English (that she had been required to make them memorize and practice for the previous few months) and rolled out the spiel for the school, all in what sounded like iambic pentameter.
   I got my hands on a recording of that, and sent it to my parents for Christmas. They played it at her for the next couple years, and I would get hate mail from her every time they did. Good times!  :azn:


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #26 on: December 17, 2019, 08:01:05 am »
A lot of words are borrowed from the Chinese/Hanja, which usually means the concept/name has been around for a long time (like over 100 years). New words that sound more English are again loan words, usually from English, in the last 100 years the Anglo-sphere has been the leader in new innovations. The reason why they use whatever word over another word is based on when it entered the language, and I guess current language 'fashion'.
Although, Koreans will often think that any loan word that's "western" is English.

Like, the other day I reviewed a lesson using subjects and made sure they pronounced "math" differently from "mass." One kid kept insisting that "mass" was English for something that looked like a scalpel.  After looking it up later, apparently "mes" is Dutch for a knife, so in Korean "메스" is a scalpel. My coteacher thought it was English as well. It entered through Japanese back in the day.


  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1908

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #27 on: December 17, 2019, 08:34:13 am »
A lot of words are borrowed from the Chinese/Hanja, which usually means the concept/name has been around for a long time (like over 100 years). New words that sound more English are again loan words, usually from English, in the last 100 years the Anglo-sphere has been the leader in new innovations. The reason why they use whatever word over another word is based on when it entered the language, and I guess current language 'fashion'.
Although, Koreans will often think that any loan word that's "western" is English.

Like, the other day I reviewed a lesson using subjects and made sure they pronounced "math" differently from "mass." One kid kept insisting that "mass" was English for something that looked like a scalpel.  After looking it up later, apparently "mes" is Dutch for a knife, so in Korean "메스" is a scalpel. My coteacher thought it was English as well. It entered through Japanese back in the day.
Another interesting thing is that a lot of 'Chinese' words for economic, and recent scientific (last 150-ish years), concepts were coined by the Japanese, and worked its way back into Chinese.


  • Mr C
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Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #28 on: December 18, 2019, 08:09:38 am »
I made a general knowledge quiz, just to see what my students know, and was surprised that at least a few kids in every class could name Bob Ross.
One of the other things in the quiz was a picture of floppy disks, and not a single student knew what those were. The first thing they guessed was "post-it notes?"
Someone 3D printed the "save" icon!

 :laugh:

Every day, I walk in the class and say 'Wazzup' as loud as possible.

No reaction.

Wazzup with these kids?

Seriously. 

Okay, but my point was that surely at least some of them would recognise a floppy as the thing that is the save icon.  Even though they don't know what it is.

Similarly, they know that vaguely barbell-looking thing represents a telephone, even if they've never seen a regular handset before.  And they know that those V aerials mean that box is a TV set, despite having no idea what an aerial is or does. Did.

Incidentally, these things are called skeuomorphs.  Arguably, the alarm clock icon with little bells on each side is a skeuomorph, since hardly anyone has such a thing anymore, but its design represents the key functionalities of the alarm clock on your phone.
Mr. C is not a bad person, in fact is quite a good person here. One of the best people on this forum if you really look at it
-Mr.DeMartino


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  • Hero of Waygookistan

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    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
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Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #29 on: February 16, 2020, 03:07:35 pm »
I was listening to music last Friday and one of my grade 2 students asked me to play his favourite song: "Rock n Roll" by Zep.

It's not a total loss.

On the other hand, none of them had heard of The Beatles.


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2020, 07:45:23 am »
I was listening to music last Friday and one of my grade 2 students asked me to play his favourite song: "Rock n Roll" by Zep.

It's not a total loss.

On the other hand, none of them had heard of The Beatles.
I had a middle school student a couple years back say that his favorite band was Metallica. I was quite surprised, both since they're now a bit older and because rock and metal aren't extremely popular here.


  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

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    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
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Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #31 on: February 19, 2020, 10:44:00 am »
I had a middle school student a couple years back say that his favorite band was Metallica. I was quite surprised, both since they're now a bit older and because rock and metal aren't extremely popular here.
There is an underground scene for various 'unpopular' music genres. But for most foreigners it's difficult to find out about it.


  • Kyndo
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Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #32 on: February 19, 2020, 10:59:20 am »
There is an underground scene for various 'unpopular' music genres. But for most foreigners it's difficult to find out about it.

There's a FB group called "Seoul Indie Rock Nerds" that's pretty active (1 or two new posts every day), and always keeps me updated on shows and concerts that I'm unable to attend.  :smiley: :undecided: :sad: