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  • fruitloops
  • Adventurer

    • 45

    • July 22, 2019, 12:00:41 pm
    • Gyeonggi-do
Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« on: February 12, 2020, 12:00:17 am »
Honest question so I hope we can get some honest answers.

For those of us that all teach English at public schools or hagwons, are you doing this because it is your passion
to teach (be a teacher) English and have a passion for children/youth?    Or are you only doing this because it's
a decent job with decent wages and you haven't been able to find anything else to really do?

For me, I can honestly say it's not my life's passion to teach, teach english, be a teacher even, although it is up there.  I do enjoy the creative process of making my own lessons, games, activities, and sharing whatever knowledge I have.  I'm also pretty good around kids and always have been my whole life so that is also up there.

But I'm in the boat of trying to find the thing I really want to dedicate the rest of my life to.   Y'know, that something that you wake up in the morning and don't think of work as work but as something you can't wait to get back to.  That's why they say, when you find your passion, you'll never have to work a day in your life.    It's not work to you.  It's your passion.  I love that.

So while I'm somewhere at 80% in this job, I know this isn't something I'll do for the rest of my life. I'm still searching for that.

What about you?   Now I do realize a lot of people are just doing this temporarily, pay off debts/student loans, travel asia, taking time off from work or study, do it for a new experience/adventure, etc.

But I also know there are some who have committed their life to it, probably settle and live in Korea, married here, raising your family here etc.

I've always wondered (not just this job but in any job), when you apply, the requirements or criteria are only things like: degrees, education, TEFL/TESOL certificates....but interestingly, it's not a requirement to have a passion in teaching, or a passion with working with kids/youth.     Therefore, its probably understood that the people they hire may only be "competent" enough to teach English, but not really enjoy or have a passion for it, and therefore shouldn't be surprised when they encounter a lot of turnover and foreign English teachers that look like they don't care or really have passion for their work.       Just an observation.


  • stoat
  • Expert Waygook

    • 654

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2020, 07:01:57 am »
Very few people end up making a living off something they're passionate about.  Doing a job that pays reasonably well and you don't mind going to is enough of a goal for most.

With regards to having a passion for teaching kids, a lot of jobs do put it on their adverts as a requirement. Not sure how they test for it though. IMO the best test would be proper qualifications. Someone who's invested real time and money on a course is more likely to be interested in doing a good job than someone who just says they're passionate when asked. Generally I'd rather employ a teacher who was competent and ambivalent about kids than someone who loved them but was useless.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2020, 07:46:51 am by stoat »


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2983

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2020, 09:27:21 am »
i like teaching and am good at it. depending on how much effort i put in depends on the job. i've had jobs here where i've completely given up (due to shit management, not usually the kids), and jobs where i put in a ton of effort - because i like it

a lot of hagwons only seem to care about their bottom line, so it's no wonder you get a lot of teachers here who don't have a passion for their work. why put in a lot of effort if it's not going to be appreciated or rewarded?

but as stoat said, people who are serious about teaching will most likely get a teacher qualification and find a job that's more rewarding and where they are more respected



Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2020, 04:03:20 pm »
I think I'm very similar to you OP.  It's definitely not my passion or my calling in life but there are a lot of aspects I like. 

But it's the environment or the culture of the EPIK public school job that I really don't like.  I wonder if I should continue to teach but in a different place, or, in what I consider to be a "real" teaching job.  If I stay in Korea then the British Council is my only aim now.  Maybe the Western management structure will completely change my view of teaching.  It would be nice to get some actual feedback, mentoring, have a career path, any kind of support pretty much.  Right now I can only guess if I'm a good teacher or not.

I feel like teaching could become my passion if I get out of public school here.  But who knows.  I'm way too comfortable and like you say, the money is really good.


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2983

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2020, 04:09:41 pm »
yeah public school atmospheres are lame. if you want to work at BC, you might be better off going to another country. i am subscribed to the job emails for Korea and I haven't seen a job ad for aaaaaaages. the young learners jobs occasionally come up, but i haven't seen any for the adult centres since i interviewed with them a couple years ago - not a single one.


  • stoat
  • Expert Waygook

    • 654

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2020, 04:18:07 pm »
The adult centres are struggling, I heard. So they probably won't be recruiting for a while.


  • stoat
  • Expert Waygook

    • 654

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2020, 06:17:36 pm »
Quote
yeah public school atmospheres are lame. if you want to work at BC, you might be better off going to another country.

Thailand are advertising at the moment

https://jobs.britishcouncil.org/Vacancies/W/5647/0/261959/5448/tha-t-3049-full-time-instructor-of-english-thailand-partner-schools-bangkok-and-chiang-mai?utm_source=external&utm_term=east-asia-thailand-thailand-teaching-centres-teacher-teacher&utm_content=tha-t-3049-full-time-instructor-of-english-thailand-partner-schools-bangkok-and-chiang-mai&utm_campaign=british-council-recruitment&utm_medium=AtsViewLink

Around 2.4 mil starting salary for 24 hours a week but more holidays and all the other BC benefits you don't get with EPIK.  Plus (genuinely) cheaper living expenses and nicer place to live.


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2983

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2020, 06:23:06 pm »
The adult centres are struggling, I heard. So they probably won't be recruiting for a while.
Damn, really. They recently just opened a new one too!


  • Nokcha
  • Super Waygook

    • 335

    • August 22, 2012, 02:37:27 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2020, 06:48:34 pm »
My story: This is my retirement. I was an elementary teacher in the states, and I decided I wanted to mix it up a bit. So, I retired from my private school in California and moved to Korea. I had friends and former students here, and had traveled extensively throughout the country. The move was an easy one. I was done with parents, testing, homework, administrative work, grading papers, etc. This job has its frustrations, mainly related to communication, but overall, I can't complain. I have my retirement back home, a pension here, a decent salary, good medical (much cheaper than what I had in the states), free rent (nice little one room - nice to down size), and loads of culture stuff I love.  Passion, don't know if I'd call it that now, but I do still enjoy it.

Had I come when I was younger, I think I would have enjoyed the teaching experience. I would have stayed for a couple of years and then gone back home to get the education needed to get me in a classroom. I think it would have sparked something in me.



  • stoat
  • Expert Waygook

    • 654

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2020, 07:17:37 pm »
Quote
nice little one room - nice to down size),

Not many people are happy about downsizing to a one room.


  • fruitloops
  • Adventurer

    • 45

    • July 22, 2019, 12:00:41 pm
    • Gyeonggi-do
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2020, 07:42:27 pm »
Interesting responses.

While I do agree that a lot of people in this world do not make a living out of something they have a passion for, I still think that should be the aim or goal in life.   Maybe settling for second best is good enough for most people, and that's not necessarily a bad thing, especially if second best is still something you really do like and enjoy, but wouldn't consider it your dream job / passion in life.   Most people could get by with "decent" or "comfortable".

I also think that times are changing very fast due to technology.  I am starting to see a shift or transition from the younger generation who are pursuing and doing what they love to do and making a living out of it now, because it's far more attainable and viable in today's world with technology and the creative ways to make a living now.   In the past, it wasn't so wide-open and you'd pretty much have to settle in line and stay within the structures they made for you.   Attempting to make your passion into your livelihood in the past had a much higher risk of failure and danger.   Today, while it's still never easy, it's very attainable.   

One example I can give you is, in the past, if you had dreams of making it to Hollywood or some big studio, and you didn't make it, you'd pretty much give up on that career path and do something else.   But now, even if you don't land in a big studio or in hollywood, you can easily do your own thing, start your own company/start-up, start a YT channel/IG, brand yourself, make your own tutorials and courses for other people to enroll in etc.   It's incredible how successful you can be today by NOT making into the big-time studios or industry.   

This sort of leads me to my next question which I probably shouldn't make a brand new thread for (but I'd like to), and that is, as a teacher, not all teachers are equal or made the same.  Every teacher has their own unique set of personality traits, personal talents, skills, expertise, interests, passions, etc.     What I mean is, for example, as english teachers, we all teach the basic / standardized curriculum and lessons.  But "how" you do it, and what methods you use, will differ depending on who you are and what your interests/passions are.

For example, what kind of english teacher would you consider yourself to be?  Are you the kind that loves using powerpoint presentations, ppt games, or simply games of any kind?  Are you the kind of person that loves to use a lot of music in your lessons, maybe you play music from youtube, sing-along, lyrics, maybe you even play  your own instruments like a guitar or piano, or you are good at singing/karaoke and dancing?    Maybe you are "sports" type english teacher where you love talking about sports, using sports in-class as games, activities, or using sports as analogies or examples on how to teach something in english.   Or some english teachers are inclined to arts and crafts, maybe you are good at making things, drawing, painting, scultping, origami, paper games, etc.   Maybe you love books and do all kinds of lessons and talks around books/reading, ppt stories, storybooks.     The list can be endless depending on what skills, talents, passions/interests you bring to the table.

For me, what I have sort of found as a good opportunity in this job is that you can utilize/do more of what you love to do in this environment while teaching english.   I find myself revolving most of my lessons and activities around my certain passions and interests and that seems to make me a lot more interested in what I'm doing because I'm not just a talking parrot, but I can share my style and interests.  That's what really gets me motivated to do an even better job at my job.    Most people want to be able to creatively express themselves and not just be boxed in under rigid and narrow structures.  That's why it makes me think more about this and that if people can do/find what they really love (or good at), they can become better performing employees, which ultimately is also better for the students right?  Isn't a happy and healthy teacher better than a dissatisfied and disgruntled teacher?

« Last Edit: February 12, 2020, 07:47:24 pm by fruitloops »


  • stoat
  • Expert Waygook

    • 654

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2020, 08:17:05 pm »
Quote
For me, what I have sort of found as a good opportunity in this job is that you can utilize/do more of what you love to do in this environment while teaching english.   I find myself revolving most of my lessons and activities around my certain passions and interests and that seems to make me a lot more interested in what I'm doing because I'm not just a talking parrot, but I can share my style and interests.  That's what really gets me motivated to do an even better job at my job.    Most people want to be able to creatively express themselves and not just be boxed in under rigid and narrow structures.  That's why it makes me think more about this and that if people can do/find what they really love (or good at), they can become better performing employees, which ultimately is also better for the students right?  Isn't a happy and healthy teacher better than a dissatisfied and disgruntled teacher?

Being a good teacher is primarily about what is good for the students, not the teacher.  if you can combine both that's great, but the first imperative should always take precedence.

You should be asking these questions in this order when planning lessons

1) What vocab/grammar/functional language do the sudents need/want to learn at this point according to their age/level?
2) How can I best introduce these concepts in the right context and at the right level?
3) How can I make the lesson interesting enough for the students to want to practise and produce these structures?
4) Is it possible to include any of my own interests and experiences to make the lesson more interesting?
« Last Edit: February 12, 2020, 10:03:40 pm by stoat »


  • fruitloops
  • Adventurer

    • 45

    • July 22, 2019, 12:00:41 pm
    • Gyeonggi-do
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2020, 10:36:12 pm »
Being a good teacher is primarily about what is good for the students, not the teacher.  if you can combine both that's great, but the first imperative should always take precedence.

You should be asking these questions in this order when planning lessons

1) What vocab/grammar/functional language do the sudents need/want to learn at this point according to their age/level?
2) How can I best introduce these concepts in the right context and at the right level?
3) How can I make the lesson interesting enough for the students to want to practise and produce these structures?
4) Is it possible to include any of my own interests and experiences to make the lesson more interesting?

Good response, thanks.  I just want to critique one point you made in the first bullet:  "1) What vocab/grammar/functional language do the students need/want to learn at this point according to their age/level?"   Being that this is #1 which means its the most valuable or heavily weighed factor, the difference between what the students want to learn and need to learn are very great.   They are not the same thing.

Herein lies my point.  I find that what students WANT to learn is often different from what they NEED to learn (based on the curriculum appointed by the education board who determine what they think the students need to learn at that particular level).    I can't tell you how many times I have seen students learn more english, better english (phonics/pronunciation), from listening to music, watching tv/movies, or even playing PC/smartphones games.   None of these would be considered "need to learn" at their level.  But they seem to pick up on it faster than from a textbook.  Why?  Because it's more enjoyable and interesting to them.    People learn things faster, better, and more efficiently when they have an interest or passion for it.    It's hard to just force them to learn english because this is what the education system deems important or relevant to their age/level.

Don't get me wrong, the system and the curriculum works very well and has had hundreds of thousands of hours of practice and experience behind them...it's not that someone just whipped together this plan over a weekend.

But what I have observed in the "advanced" students vs the low-level students are mainly 2 things:  1) they are smart students (at everything) and/or 2) they have a real interest or liking to english.

If they have both, they excel far faster and higher than any other student.   They are the ones that always ask me questions how to say this in English.  They are the ones that always try to speak in English.  Nobody is telling them to do it.   But for the rest of the students, they don't have the same interest/liking or desire to learn english, so their effort is not as great as one who does.

I have even had students who were considered low-end in their class in other subjects, yet in English they were one of the highest.  Weird combo.  When I investigated those students and picked their brains, I found out it was because they had a great interest in everything English...particula rly music, movies, tv shows, and video games....I was quite surprised at how advanced they were considering they didn't go to any hagwons or get extra english extracurricular classes/programs (they weren't from rich families).  It was all on their own initiative and with YouTube nowadays, you could literally make a course on English for students I bet, haha.   Not saying this is the recommended way to learn or teach english but for example, BTS is so famous now and when people ask how RM learned to speak English so well they ask him where he learned his English and he said when he was a kid his mom made him watch the entire Friends season series, and of course he enjoyed it.  Conventional no, but effective and does it work? Seem so.

Just an observation I wanted to share.

« Last Edit: February 12, 2020, 10:41:21 pm by fruitloops »


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1614

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2020, 11:31:57 pm »
1. At the end of almost every day I am HAPPY thinking of 1,2... sometimes all 4 classes. I feel like I have seen progress, improvement in the lives of people, if jyst a few and only in limited ways.

2. My moments OF JOY in my life often come in the middle of a class.

3. I get up eager in the morning to teach, to the point of getting up some Saturdays and thinking, oh, no class today, and feeling a bit deflated (especially if i have no plans and it's cloudy/dusty and cold).

4. I am an early bird. I have always committed myself to a 1.5 hour prep schedule, so since i teach at 4pm to 8pm, that means i arrive at 2:30 pm, always living 9 or less minutes away *no way will i ever waste life in the commute*
.. that means, wake up 6ish to 8ish, and don't get dressed for work until 2. That's 6 to 8 hours every morning for this early bird to enjoy my hobbies and interests and yet look forward to teaching too!

5. I have rinsed and repeated this joy since 2002. Being able to travel weekends crisscrossing the peninsula has been a pleasant bonus, even if these days i do it just once a month in the cooler part of the year.

At the end of this month my middle schoolers at the hagwon have vocab, essay and TOEIC tests. I am preparing them as well as I can.

In December two of my students went to New York City for 9 days because they had been 2 of the 4 girls at their middle school to win the speech contest after 20+ extea hours the previous month in one-on-one speech training with me, they having to know 5 speeches, one of which they were to have randomly drawn at the last minute to present. They practiced hard with me and i enjoyed every minute. They improved daily. Steve Jobs, MLK jr., Lincoln, Malala and BTS at the UN. They mastered them all, we reviewing the feeling in every line. When you have smart students motivated to try their best, you can get lost in the joy of development, in making a difference.

Like a coach with a championship team, a director with a stellar cast, a farmer with a bumper crop, ... the process is as great as the endproduct.

I LOVE teaching! I agonize when some new yahoo joins a great class and doesn't 'get' we are high octane performance from the first minute to the last.

Anyways... i gushed this while waiting on my phone for my korean friend to return to the restaurant after taking his gal home. Duk bokeum tang, spicy chicken stew, yum.

G'night.


Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #14 on: February 13, 2020, 08:14:56 am »
I've had various jobs since I was fourteen.  I like to do some work and then be paid for it.  I would never receive pocket money from my parents until I'd done things around the house or garden, so I suppose that is where that came from.  If it involved something I'm interested in and am passionate about then that is perfect.  Cutting the grass?  I loved that, as I like to do things perfectly, and it involved a machine.   :laugh:

I worked in a Hilton Hotel as a porter (so much more than carrying cases, which was very rarely done) when I was sixteen, and kept that job while I was a uni student so when I came back home, I started work straight away during the long holidays.  Loved that job as every day was different.  Which is important to me.  There were also so many different kinds of staff in a hotel so the diversity every day with the other staff and the guests made each day fun. 

I worked in a bank in Sheffield for a couple of years which was boring as hell.  The money was good, but I didn't like it as every day was the same.  It was also the same time as 'The Office'.  But lunch time, I'd buy a sandwich, go to a DnB record shop and listen to tunes during my lunch break.   Best bit of my day.

Over my time working, I realise what I like and that has culminated in why I stayed in Korea so long.  Variety every day.  Creativity.  Being able to do something well and take pride in it.  Feel appreciation from my co-workers. 

Which is why I like teaching here.  Every day is different.  I get paid well.  I love the individuality of my students (high school really is the best) and respect them for it.  I make their learning interesting and effective for them.  I wait to the week before deciding on their classes fr the following week, as I gauge their mood and motivation.  My relationship with my P/VP and other teachers is great.  I can be creative with my classes as I have total control.  I see how my students get better and help them in their kind of soul-crushing high school life. 


  • stoat
  • Expert Waygook

    • 654

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2020, 08:16:52 am »
Good response, thanks.  I just want to critique one point you made in the first bullet:  "1) What vocab/grammar/functional language do the students need/want to learn at this point according to their age/level?"   Being that this is #1 which means its the most valuable or heavily weighed factor, the difference between what the students want to learn and need to learn are very great.   They are not the same thing.

Herein lies my point.  I find that what students WANT to learn is often different from what they NEED to learn (based on the curriculum appointed by the education board who determine what they think the students need to learn at that particular level).    I can't tell you how many times I have seen students learn more english, better english (phonics/pronunciation), from listening to music, watching tv/movies, or even playing PC/smartphones games.   None of these would be considered "need to learn" at their level.  But they seem to pick up on it faster than from a textbook.  Why?  Because it's more enjoyable and interesting to them.    People learn things faster, better, and more efficiently when they have an interest or passion for it.    It's hard to just force them to learn english because this is what the education system deems important or relevant to their age/level.

Don't get me wrong, the system and the curriculum works very well and has had hundreds of thousands of hours of practice and experience behind them...it's not that someone just whipped together this plan over a weekend.

But what I have observed in the "advanced" students vs the low-level students are mainly 2 things:  1) they are smart students (at everything) and/or 2) they have a real interest or liking to english.

If they have both, they excel far faster and higher than any other student.   They are the ones that always ask me questions how to say this in English.  They are the ones that always try to speak in English.  Nobody is telling them to do it.   But for the rest of the students, they don't have the same interest/liking or desire to learn english, so their effort is not as great as one who does.

I have even had students who were considered low-end in their class in other subjects, yet in English they were one of the highest.  Weird combo.  When I investigated those students and picked their brains, I found out it was because they had a great interest in everything English...particula rly music, movies, tv shows, and video games....I was quite surprised at how advanced they were considering they didn't go to any hagwons or get extra english extracurricular classes/programs (they weren't from rich families).  It was all on their own initiative and with YouTube nowadays, you could literally make a course on English for students I bet, haha.   Not saying this is the recommended way to learn or teach english but for example, BTS is so famous now and when people ask how RM learned to speak English so well they ask him where he learned his English and he said when he was a kid his mom made him watch the entire Friends season series, and of course he enjoyed it.  Conventional no, but effective and does it work? Seem so.

Just an observation I wanted to share.



Yes there are some highly motivated students but they're not the norm, so you have to teach to the majority.  Frankly I call BS on the story about that kid learning English from  being forced to watch Friends. You'd have to be pretty high level to understand even the basics of what they were talking about in a foreign sit com.  Check out Krashen's Comprehensible Input theory. You have to start from simple structures and expressions and build on that. Yes kids might be more interested in learning hip hop slang or words for weapons in computer games but they're not high frequency enough to be of much use. So most of the time, you have to think about what they need, not what they want. With adults it's different, what they want can take precedence. Though most korean adults are pretty clueless when asked about that and just say something like 'more vocabulary.'  It's nice to be able to include a little of what kids want but I wouldnt make it a priority.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2020, 08:30:38 am by stoat »


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 3921

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2020, 11:59:22 am »
Frankly I call BS on the story about that kid learning English from  being forced to watch Friends. You'd have to be pretty high level to understand even the basics of what they were talking about in a foreign sit com.  Check out Krashen's Comprehensible Input theory. You have to start from simple structures and expressions and build on that.

Korean kids start learning English from a young age. That's a foundation. Plus Rap Monster is a smart guy.
https://www.soompi.com/article/1333227wpp/7-times-btss-rm-proved-his-148-iq


  • stoat
  • Expert Waygook

    • 654

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2020, 12:35:57 pm »
Quote
Rap Monster is a smart guy.
  ;D

(I'm sure he is, it's just an amusing juxtaposition)


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1375

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2020, 03:53:13 pm »
Honest question so I hope we can get some honest answers.

For those of us that all teach English at public schools or hagwons, are you doing this because it is your passion
to teach (be a teacher) English and have a passion for children/youth?    Or are you only doing this because it's
a decent job with decent wages and you haven't been able to find anything else to really do?

For me, I can honestly say it's not my life's passion to teach, teach english, be a teacher even, although it is up there.  I do enjoy the creative process of making my own lessons, games, activities, and sharing whatever knowledge I have.  I'm also pretty good around kids and always have been my whole life so that is also up there.

But I'm in the boat of trying to find the thing I really want to dedicate the rest of my life to.   Y'know, that something that you wake up in the morning and don't think of work as work but as something you can't wait to get back to.  That's why they say, when you find your passion, you'll never have to work a day in your life.    It's not work to you.  It's your passion.  I love that.

So while I'm somewhere at 80% in this job, I know this isn't something I'll do for the rest of my life. I'm still searching for that.

What about you?   Now I do realize a lot of people are just doing this temporarily, pay off debts/student loans, travel asia, taking time off from work or study, do it for a new experience/adventure, etc.

But I also know there are some who have committed their life to it, probably settle and live in Korea, married here, raising your family here etc.

I've always wondered (not just this job but in any job), when you apply, the requirements or criteria are only things like: degrees, education, TEFL/TESOL certificates....but interestingly, it's not a requirement to have a passion in teaching, or a passion with working with kids/youth.     Therefore, its probably understood that the people they hire may only be "competent" enough to teach English, but not really enjoy or have a passion for it, and therefore shouldn't be surprised when they encounter a lot of turnover and foreign English teachers that look like they don't care or really have passion for their work.       Just an observation.

This might have been for money in 2008.  But, in 2020?  Need a raise if folks are going to say its for the money now. 


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2983

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Is This Your Passion or just for money?
« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2020, 03:58:42 pm »
it depends, hangook. i earn more here than i could ever probably in my home country