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  • DragonSheep
  • Waygookin

    • 17

    • October 08, 2010, 03:26:14 pm
    • South Korea - Samcheok
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2011, 03:21:15 pm »
I actually had this issue today. I call it a hairband, however wanted to tell the student that headband is also used. As i did this my teacher turns to me and tells me that it would confuse the students and that we should just stick to the book. Surly its better for them to understand what other people call it as well?


  • PuuOnToast
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • April 02, 2011, 10:08:28 am
    • Redlands,Ca
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #21 on: May 24, 2011, 06:41:03 am »
A headband is something that goes across your head between the crown of your head and the forehead.
A hairband is something that keeps the hair together like a scrunchy?
Thats how I've always thought about it.
~이게 최선입니까? 확실해요?~


  • gookway
  • Super Waygook

    • 263

    • March 31, 2011, 12:22:19 pm
    • Korea
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #22 on: May 24, 2011, 07:31:39 am »
agreed.  Headband is the one that goes over your head (from ear to ear) to keep (usually) long bangs or hair back
away from falling in your eyes.

Hairbands can be anything that is simply used to tie hair or hold hair together.

Headband is more specific whereas hairbands can be many different kinds.


Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #23 on: June 02, 2011, 02:32:18 pm »
hairband


  • Mezoti97
  • The Legend

    • 2697

    • April 14, 2011, 03:02:50 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #24 on: June 02, 2011, 02:42:10 pm »
I call the thick bands that go over your whole head "headbands."  The little bands for ponytails I call "hair bands."  I've never heard of "hair band" for "head band" until coming to Korea.

I'm from the eastern US, if location makes a difference.

I do this also.

headband=sturdy, thick, plastic band that goes over your whole head
hair band, hair tie, ponytail holder=stretchy, thin, elastic band that goes around a ponytail).
scrunchie=a hair band/hair tie with gathered cloth that goes around a ponytail.
sweat band=goes around forehead to keep sweat out of eyes


Yes, I agree with this.


  • H.W.
  • Veteran

    • 152

    • September 09, 2010, 01:14:18 pm
    • Seoul, Yeongdeungpo
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #25 on: June 02, 2011, 03:15:53 pm »
My mother and sisters have always seemed to always seemed to use the two interchangeably, with a slight emphasis on"headband".  Hair elastic is a separate category which explains itself.  I'm a man, so this is a low usage word for me.  :D
"No matter how I struggle and strive / I'll never get out of this world alive."


  • raider576
  • Adventurer

    • 56

    • December 12, 2010, 05:35:51 pm
    • Korea
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2011, 03:30:05 pm »
In my mind, a hairband is something that women wear and headbands are unisex. 

hairbands can be of various shapes,sizes and materials.

Headbands are made primarily of cloth and are closed loops or (for roleplaying kids/costumes) open loops that close with velcro.


Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #27 on: June 02, 2011, 03:31:57 pm »
A hairband is a group of musicians with a lot of hair and hairspray who play together in a guitar-based rock group. Usually they sing songs such as "Pour Some Sugar on Me".

Just sayin'.


  • laizamaria
  • Adventurer

    • 50

    • December 02, 2010, 10:24:49 am
    • south korea
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #28 on: June 02, 2011, 03:40:46 pm »
I thought they were two slightly different things. A headband is like what Rambo wears and a hairband is the plastic thing that girls wear to keep their hair back and that doesn't go all the way around the head.

The small loop things to make a ponytail, I call them bobbles.

It depends.  A hairband is the half-circle thing that holds your hair back. If it's an elastic band used to hold your hair back, then it's also called a hairband. A headband is an elastic band placed over your head to promote sweat, or keep your head warm. Typically accompanies a sweat suit.

Same here. I have the tendency to call the small loop things hairband as well...
« Last Edit: June 02, 2011, 03:45:01 pm by laizamaria »
Spontaneity is the key to having a good time.


  • kiibee
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • June 13, 2011, 09:10:22 am
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #29 on: June 13, 2011, 09:24:35 am »
I say headband but I have heard my students say hairband.


  • Charis
  • Explorer

    • 7

    • June 15, 2011, 08:48:03 am
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #30 on: June 15, 2011, 10:15:32 pm »
Hairband. I use it.


  • lsb35j
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • June 14, 2011, 07:33:12 am
    • BUNDANG
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #31 on: June 16, 2011, 01:13:44 pm »
I've always said headband (I'm from the US), but we were teaching 6G hairband from the book today. I did a Google search and sure enough some people do seem to call them hairbands. Just wanted to get the consensus.
Of course it's hairband~!!


  • krrobert
  • Explorer

    • 6

    • November 23, 2010, 02:50:00 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #32 on: June 16, 2011, 01:24:06 pm »
They are two different things:
1. Hairband: Is a band that goes around your hair. You use these to make ponytails or pig tails.
2. Headband: This is aband that goes across your head. It's decorative or it can be used to keep bangs or fly aways out of your face.


Re: Hairband or headband, which do you say?
« Reply #33 on: June 16, 2011, 01:33:27 pm »
I found this really interesting as well! I usually say headband when I am talking about the band you put on your head and use to keep your bangs out of your eyes. And hairband when I am talking about a small band used to tie your entire hair out of your eyes in a ponytail.

I told my co-teacher this, and she said she would teach it my way.

When I explained the difference to the kids, all the girls had a light bulb go off and they understood. The boys were just like, aren't they the same thing?

It doesn't bother me either way, but when I first heard it I was slightly confused as to what was going on.

I told them they could use it like the book teaches, but if they go to America people might be confused.