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Grammar question "and I's?"
« on: January 16, 2020, 12:22:33 am »
This grammar question has been nagging me all day. Is it grammatically correct to say "Me and my wife's house..." or "My wife and I's house..."? I know I usually comes after the other people, but I find "I's" totally nauseating so I always avoid the situation by just saying "our".


  • Cohort 2019
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Re: Grammar question "and I's?"
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2020, 01:25:26 am »
Quote
Is it grammatically correct to say "Me and my wife's house..." or "My wife and I's house..."?
No, that's perhaps acceptable as US vernacular but not on an English test.

you have to use the genitive evenly for each part of that noun phrase:

Peter's house
Peter's and Minsoo's house

My friend's and my wife's friend's handbag


The genitive of I=my
I's nose itches.--> my nose itches

My wife's and my house


Mine and my wife's house is what my elderly mum would say I think.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 03:05:32 am by Cohort 2019 »
incumbo studiis


  • oglop
  • The Legend

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    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
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Re: Grammar question "and I's?"
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2020, 07:35:30 am »
fyi for future reference these are called "coordinate possessives"

Quote
How do I indicate possession when something belongs to two people?
Linguists call these coordinate possessives. In other words, two nouns or pronouns1 are coordinated by and, but we want to show that both of them possess something. Because those two elements are coordinated, we can refer to them as coordinates.

Situation #1: Both coordinates are nouns
If the two coordinates possess something jointly, we add -'s to the final coordinate:

John and Mary's coffee shop
If each of the two coordinates possesses something separately, we add -'s to both coordinates, and we typically pluralize that something:

John's and Mary's coffee shops

Situation #2: One of the coordinates is a pronoun
English offers no easy or elegant way to form coordinate possessives when one of the coordinates is a pronoun.

In published prose, you will most likely see the pattern x's and possessive pronoun y, so:

my brother's and my food
Mary's and my house

But in less formal contexts, you will see many variations. Most frequent are these variations:

me and my brother's food
mine and my brother's food
my brother and I's food
my and my brother's food
and so on.

These versions are not "wrong" or "bad grammar" they are just non-standard. They represent the way that most people talk, but they might not be appropriate in formal writing contexts.

1 Note that many linguists consider pronouns to be nouns. But for ease of discussion, we will talk separately of nouns and pronouns.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 07:42:29 am by oglop »


Re: Grammar question "and I's?"
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2020, 10:05:08 am »
Thanks you guys. I will use, "My wife's and my house..." from now on.