Read 14526 times

  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4493

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #80 on: January 03, 2020, 07:49:02 pm »
Is that why Kim Kardashian and Paris Hilton have hundreds of millions of dollars and teachers are scraping by in the states? Stop with your nonsense. Capitalism rewards exploitation. Those who know how to profit off the backs of others are the ones that make the most money. Literally stealing from the benefit of others labor and extracting that value from other people's hard work is the backbone of capitalism.

Teachers in the USA are well paid, generally speaking. Including benefits, which is money paid into their retirement account, etc., they average over $100k per year. While working only 180 days per year. That's more days not working than working.

Kim Kardashian and Paris Hilton didn't "steal" money. Consumers willingly gave it to them for their perfume lines , DJ performances, television appearances, etc.

Both of them started with wealthy parents.

That’s the key to making money.


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4995

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #81 on: January 03, 2020, 08:04:15 pm »
The majority of American millionaires are self made.

The majority of American billionaires are self made.


  • Cohort 2019
  • Expert Waygook

    • 555

    • August 17, 2019, 08:09:23 pm
    • 90°S.- 0'E
    more
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #82 on: January 04, 2020, 03:57:26 am »
https://howmuch.net/sources/average-teacher-salary-by-state

It's not a copious amount but 81,000 average wage in NY isn't entirely bad either.
 Top Ten States Where Teachers Earn the Most
1. New York: $81,613

2. Alaska: $80,627

3. Connecticut: $78,567

4. California: $76,523

5. Massachusetts: $75,720

6. New Jersey: $72,460

7. Oregon: $69,643

8. Virginia: $68,707

9. Maryland: $67,173

10. Rhode Island: $67,050

« Last Edit: January 04, 2020, 04:03:00 am by Cohort 2019 »
incumbo studiis


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1913

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #83 on: January 04, 2020, 04:03:15 am »
Wow. Traditionally Democratic Party states have better paid teachers.

I ain't no rocket scientist, nor American, but the politics is clear.


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1334

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #84 on: January 04, 2020, 05:04:47 am »
Wow. Traditionally Democratic Party states have better paid teachers.

I ain't no rocket scientist, nor American, but the politics is clear.

Which states have the highest cost of living though?

Alaska vs Alabama is quite the gap in prices.

Southern states generally don’t have to deal with colder weather and have longer growing seasons.

Korea is expensive because the population is quite large for the land mass and winter stops almost all domestic production of food.

Teachers in Korea should at least earn 4.0 million a month politics aside.


  • Cohort 2019
  • Expert Waygook

    • 555

    • August 17, 2019, 08:09:23 pm
    • 90°S.- 0'E
    more
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #85 on: January 04, 2020, 05:45:31 am »
Quote
학원 강사의 평균연봉은 1900만~2200만원을 오간다.May 15, 2017

Korean hakwon teachers average out at 19-22 mill per year or...14-20 mill per month. ;D I call bs on that video tbh.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVmW3hbJr8g

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLJ9Net_StM
« Last Edit: January 04, 2020, 05:58:37 am by Cohort 2019 »
incumbo studiis


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4995

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #86 on: January 04, 2020, 05:57:55 am »
How many hours are the Korean hagwon teachers working? I assume many are on short, part time hours with that being just one revenue source for them while another is off the books private tutoring they do on the side on their own, etc.

Leaponover says he pays his Korean teacher three million a month. (No other hagwon owner posting here spoke on that.)


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4995

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #87 on: January 04, 2020, 06:20:06 am »
In the 1990s, Son Joo-eun was a much sought-after tutor offering only a select few affluent students tips on how to score well in the national college exam. Having grown up poor and landed a place at the elite Seoul National University, he easily took home 50 million won ($47,000) from his tutoring work, enough to buy a standard two-bed room house in Seoul back then, each month.

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20170908000667

The business has since taken a downward turn, as competition thickened and saturation neared in the online test-prep services market.






Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #88 on: January 04, 2020, 06:20:58 am »
Cohort those are average salaries. A first year teacher would get $30,000 to $45,000 a year. 70-80k would be for someone with many years of experience. Talking about salaries for long-term teachers is completely pointless when most E-2's don't even have a teaching degree in the first place. And why the hell was someone bringing up nurse practitioners, a nurse practitioner needs a master's degree in nursing.

It would be great if people here could at least try to somehow give relevant advice based on reality instead of spreading grass is greener bullshit.
Quote
Quote from: Mr.DeMartino on Yesterday at 01:40:32
    Trump is a liar and a con man.
Quote
Quote from Mr.DeMartino on June 14, 2019 at 02:28:07
Donald Trump is a lying sack of shit


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4995

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #89 on: January 04, 2020, 06:33:05 am »
Most posters in this thread aren't first year teachers. We're men getting up in age. I'm simply showing how far below average men working as English teachers abroad are compared to their similarly aged counterparts in the USA. Career progression matters. Otherwise you're losing in life. Sure, it's not something we want to hear, but it's something to consider. Denial as a coping mechanism is dangerous.


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1334

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #90 on: January 04, 2020, 06:49:27 am »
Cohort those are average salaries. A first year teacher would get $30,000 to $45,000 a year. 70-80k would be for someone with many years of experience. Talking about salaries for long-term teachers is completely pointless when most E-2's don't even have a teaching degree in the first place. And why the hell was someone bringing up nurse practitioners, a nurse practitioner needs a master's degree in nursing.

It would be great if people here could at least try to somehow give relevant advice based on reality instead of spreading grass is greener bullshit.

What would you compare Korean ESL teachers too?

Based on wages it would be similar to McDonald’s or Burger King workers in Canada.

Comparing ESL teachers to western teachers is fair as most are E2 teachers that require a university/college degree.


  • stoat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1559

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #91 on: January 04, 2020, 06:52:27 am »
Quote
In the 1990s, Son Joo-eun was a much sought-after tutor offering only a select few affluent students tips on how to score well in the national college exam. Having grown up poor and landed a place at the elite Seoul National University, he easily took home 50 million won ($47,000) from his tutoring work, enough to buy a standard two-bed room house in Seoul back then, each month.

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20170908000667

The business has since taken a downward turn, as competition thickened and saturation neared in the online test-prep services market.

Yes, interesting that he's advocating for change, after he's made all his money and the business is in a downward spiral.


  • Cohort 2019
  • Expert Waygook

    • 555

    • August 17, 2019, 08:09:23 pm
    • 90°S.- 0'E
    more
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #92 on: January 04, 2020, 08:18:34 am »
Cohort those are average salaries. A first year teacher would get $30,000 to $45,000 a year. 70-80k would be for someone with many years of experience. Talking about salaries for long-term teachers is completely pointless ...

My first few years were indeed pretty tough because I hadn't saved up much in Korea and only made the (NQT) starting teacher's pay of 2,4 mill, but I received so much support from the govt. and extra funding from the school that I could live comfortably. After my B.ed degree I immediately got that 'senior'  level you mentioned because I skipped a few pay scales.

When I read about how all of you capable, experienced teachers are getting taken up the bumhole on a daily basis, I just wonder why you would let them. Just come back home where every co-worker, principal and parent appreciates and respects your dedication and passion for good education. You are all great teachers and your skills are wasted away languishing marginalised in Asia.

 I'll stop posting my 'teach back home' mantra but I am not wrong in saying that anyone could do it no matter how old you are, I even had a 60-year-old classmate. It's just a simple matter of applying to a school and getting hired based on your many years of experience. I had never taught high school but still got hired on the spot and all I had to do was to promise to manage my classes and to start my degree (all paid for) in Sept.

Your years of ESL experience are invaluable! 
« Last Edit: January 04, 2020, 08:29:37 am by Cohort 2019 »
incumbo studiis


  • alexisalex
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1065

    • March 02, 2014, 05:10:24 pm
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #93 on: January 04, 2020, 09:30:15 am »
Keep posting Cohort!  It's good to get a more positive view on things.

To confirm, you left Korea and got an ESL teaching job in Europe without a PGCE.  The school/company you worked for paid for you to get your PGCE?  Is that right?


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4995

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #94 on: January 04, 2020, 06:32:14 pm »
I'm trying to get my fellow ex-pats to see the flaws in capitalism, but I can read some of the replies and I'm guessing that there are a few of you that will want to dig your heals in

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5ZDgz8MO1M


  • Cohort 2019
  • Expert Waygook

    • 555

    • August 17, 2019, 08:09:23 pm
    • 90°S.- 0'E
    more
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #95 on: January 04, 2020, 06:39:18 pm »
Thanks for the kind words, but MayorHagger is right, I think I have gotten the message out, at least to you. Yes, but I had to completely start over so I had to do a 4- years Bachelors of Education first, going to class 2 nights a week, working 4 days at an inner city school, predominantly disadvantaged kids who had bullied away several teachers before me. They were lovely kids btw. I had no problem teaching them, the previous teachers must have been absolutely unfit for purpose.

I am in my last 6 months of wrapping up my Masters (PGCE), after which I am going to ask for one of the highest scales, simply because there is a dire shortage of M.eds that are qualified to teach the highest exam classes (6th Form). I am not an extraordinary person and I feel extremely lucky to have such wonderful colleagues and students, being valued especially for my ESL experience and being allowed to implement all of that in my daily practice and literally all I am doing is banking on my recollections of those years together with you guys in Korea, sitting at a Hof or eating BBQ, talking about how f 'd everything at school is and how we could help our students better.

I have 'longterm' teachers as Mayorhagger calls them show up for class, open up the books, explain grammar, assign homework and lock the doors and disappear off to home leaving the kids struggling and hating English. Opposite to that you have our ESL teaching style, which makes class interesting and even fun and a few 17-year-olds said to their mentor that 'even when you're dead tired, you want to go to his class'. Thing is, the only colleagues that get me, are Brits or American teachers, because native Europeans are just so reliant on their books and grammar. Now, to each their own of course but your ESL experience is a specialty that is in demand because of immigration and the teacher's shortages everywhere. I do not know how to get into teaching in the States but there is a huge shortage there, just find a website where schools post vacancies and start applying or calling principals. I have shown in this thread that it only took me 5 min. to find a Phonics teaching position at an Early years school in London who specifically only asked for someone with experience, no qualifications.

Similarly to this, when I got back home there were only 10 vacancies in January, now there are 50-70 for Teacher of English positions alone, and the largest predicted spike is going to be in 2025. And this is in the middle of the academic year with 3 semesters still to go in a tiny country with 500.000 students. The UK will grow to 3 million students next year and a 17 % shortage of teachers and currently has 200 openings (most seem for September? https://www.tes.com/jobs/search?siteCountry=gb&sort=&locations=United%20Kingdom&keywords=Teacher%20of%20English  ) which is a tell-tale sign to me that if you are already posting in January to hire teachers for the new year in September, something must be terribly wrong in the UK. Surely there must be a school desperate enough to read your application and consider it? January is a shit time to have to look for sub teachers because 1: there aren't any 2: the ones you can get are looking for work for a reason (lemons) so having a fresh, experienced ESL teacher like me/us must have felt like a godsend.

My introduction letter only said that I had taught for 10 years in Korea at this and that school and I had a glowing recommendation letter attached to it. If you work at EPIK, just take a pic of you and the kids in the class all seated neatly in rows and you teaching something professional looking, if you teach at a hakwon, just take a picture of you standing in front of the blackboard or if it is a kindy show them you interacting with the kids on the floor.

I asked the principals later why they had chosen me over the other fully qualified applicants, and most of them said that they liked my enthusiasm and passion for teaching because I had taught in Korea for such a long time. So, I was merely being friendly and professional during my interview, but they assumed (correctly) that my having gone abroad also meant that I was willing to go the extra mile and would not easily give up on the kids.  It was also appreciated that I was knowledgeable on certain aspects of our profession because I also talked passionately about how I use a lot of conversation practice in class. I was friendly, open and honest about my lack of formal training, but also interested to learn from other people to improve myself. They liked all of it and it's basically who we are and how we work isn't it? Because if you managed to stick around for so long as we have in such an atrocious environment, you sure know how to be quick on your feet and become professional real fast.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2020, 09:30:49 pm by Cohort 2019 »
incumbo studiis


  • NorthStar
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1319

    • July 05, 2017, 10:54:06 am
    • Mouseville
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #96 on: January 04, 2020, 07:08:22 pm »
Thanks for the kind words, but MayorHagger is right, I think I have gotten the message out, at least to you. Yes, but I had to completely start over so I had to do a 4- years Bachelors of Education first, going to class 2 nights a week, working 4 days at an inner city school, predominantly disadvantaged kids who had bullied away several teachers before me. They were lovely kids btw. I had no problem teaching them, the previous teachers must have been absolutely unfit for purpose.

I am in my last 6 months of wrapping up my Masters (PGCE), after which I am going to ask for one of the highest scales, simply because there is a dire shortage of M.eds that are qualified to teach the highest exam classes (6th Form). I am not an extraordinary person and I feel extremely lucky to have such wonderful colleagues and students, being valued especially for my ESL experience and being allowed to implement all of that in my daily practice and literally all I am doing is banking on my recollections of those years together with you guys in Korea, sitting at a Hof or eating BBQ, talking about how f 'd everything at school is and how we could help our students better.

I have 'longterm' teachers as Mayorhagger calls them show up for class, open up the books, explain grammar, assign homework and lock the doors and disappear off to home leaving the kids struggling and hating English. Opposite to that you have our ESL teaching style, which makes class interesting and even fun and a few 17-year-olds said to their mentor that 'even when you're dead tired, you want to go to his class'. Thing is, the only colleagues that get me, are Brits or American teachers, because native Europeans are just so reliant on their books and grammar. Now, to each their own of course but your ESL experience is a specialty that is in demand because of immigration and the teacher's shortages everywhere. I do not know how to get into teaching in the States but there is a huge shortage there, just find a website where schools post vacancies and start applying or calling principals. I have shown in this thread that it only took me 5 min. to find a Phonics teaching position at an Early years school in London who specifically only asked for someone with experience, no qualifications.

Similarly to this, when I got back home there were only 10 vacancies in January, now there are 50-70, and the largest predicted spike is going to be in 2025. And this is in a tiny country with 500.000 students. The UK will grow to 3 million students next year and a 17 % shortage of teachers and currently has 200 openings (most seem for September? https://www.tes.com/jobs/search?siteCountry=gb&sort=&locations=United%20Kingdom&keywords=Teacher%20of%20English  ) which is a tell-tale sign to me that if you are already posting in January to hire teachers for the new year in September, something must be terribly wrong in the UK. Surely there must be a school desperate enough to read your application and consider it? January is a shit time to have to look for sub teachers because 1: there aren't any 2: the ones you can get are looking for work for a reason (lemons) so having a fresh, experienced ESL teacher like me/us must have felt like a godsend.

My introduction letter only said that I had taught for 10 years in Korea at this and that school and I had a glowing recommendation letter attached to it. If you work at EPIK, just take a pic of you and the kids in the class all seated neatly in rows and you teaching something professional looking, if you teach at a hakwon, just take a picture of you standing in front of the blackboard or if it is a kindy show them you interacting with the kids on the floor.

I asked the principals later why they had chosen me over the other fully qualified applicants, and most of them said that they liked my enthusiasm and passion for teaching because I had taught in Korea for such a long time. So, I was merely being friendly and professional during my interview, but they assumed (correctly) that my having gone abroad also meant that I was willing to go the extra mile and would not easily give up on the kids.  It was also appreciated that I was knowledgeable on certain aspects of our profession because I also talked passionately about how I use a lot of conversation practice in class. I was friendly, open and honest about my lack of formal training, but also interested to learn from other people to improve myself. They liked all of it and it's basically who we are and how we work isn't it? Because if you managed to stick around for so long as we have in such an atrocious environment, you sure know how to be quick on your feet and become professional real fast.

All good stuff, man. 

The US....all depends on the mighty GPA.  I looked into alternative ways for getting into the classroom (licensed) but...my GPA was too low.  I did great my first 2 years in college...Dean's List and all.  But...I joined a fraternity and the GPA took a major dive.  Most these types of programs want a minimum of 2.5 (in the U.S.)..no exceptions.  Mine was 2.48.

I talked with people and despite my experience and actual love for the job, they could not help. 

...good old U.S. of A...hurting for teachers. 


  • stoat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1559

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #97 on: January 04, 2020, 08:01:55 pm »
Regarding whether to teach here or at home, it's all about the kind of job you want to do.

1) If you want to teach adults you can make more money teaching adults here. - I'm not talking about the bog standard split shift YBM/Pagoda job
2) If you want to teach small groups of kids in a non regulated way and be able to negotiate your salary/teaching times, it's better here.
3) if you want to teach large classes of kids in the state sector, it's better back home if you want to do it long time and progress up the salary scale.  However proper International schools here would have a better financial package.
4) If you want to teach university age students conditions are generally better here, money not.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2020, 10:40:08 pm by stoat »


  • Cohort 2019
  • Expert Waygook

    • 555

    • August 17, 2019, 08:09:23 pm
    • 90°S.- 0'E
    more
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #98 on: January 04, 2020, 10:49:10 pm »
I talked with people and despite my experience and actual love for the job, they could not help. 

...good old U.S. of A...hurting for teachers.

Wow, that sucks, man, but don't give up yet. First of all, that sounds like the worst thing you can do if your country is 200.000 teachers short so perhaps look at this https://www.teachercertificationdegrees.com/become/#choose

But as an American, you know better than I how your govt. is working on getting as many candidates as possible licensed.  You could also apply anywhere for an ESL job in Europe (Spain, Italy, Germany, Hungary) and start an evening course there. Once you have an education related BA degree, you, as an American, can apply to any job in the USA or UK as well. Look, no school is going to publicly advertise they are looking for unqualified teachers, although I found that Phonics one which would be an excellent way in I think, but once you're on the ground and people get to know you everybody will be more than happy to help a fellow teacher out. You have simply no idea how difficult it is to find good teachers of English, let alone science or Maths teachers. All those principals are in touch with each other trying to get people from literally anywhere. There is even talk of putting ordinary people in classes, teaching them 'real-life' skills such as baking bread or planting tomatoes.  :rolleyes:

It's surprising to hear the US has such strict guidelines, but there are a lot of private language institutes there as well you could try. Whether it is because Canada has made it so easy to get licensed or because they do not want to invest in education,it is weird because in Europe we are panicking. I remember in 2018 this one international school for expat kids couldn't find a native speaker for a whole 6 months. I will post once I see such ads again but indeed they are relatively uncommon. I know that that one Canadian teacher had a rough time finding a job back home in Canada but I had a completely opposite experience. People were really interested and intrigued.

https://www.eslbase.com/jobs/spain/

https://www.wantedinrome.com/classified/jobs-vacant

This one, again found in 5 min. of searching, has similar req. as for Epik.
https://www.wantedinrome.com/classified/english-teachers-required-in-rome-immediate-start-2-2.html

https://easymilano.com/search-results/?ad_title=english+teacher&cat_id=&location=


incumbo studiis


  • Observer
  • Adventurer

    • 29

    • February 04, 2015, 07:42:35 am
    • Great Lakes
Re: Minimum wage is too high! It will destroy the struggling ESL industry here
« Reply #99 on: January 05, 2020, 12:59:29 am »
I have to say I find Cohort's posts and almost unbearable positivity a strange thing on this generally embittered forum.  It's not unwelcome, but I do think his (?) posts aren't terribly relevant to most people here.

For the relatively few non-UK people who teach in Korea (or China or Japan, whatever) who are fortunate enough to have EU work authorization, I suppose he makes fair points. I believe he works in the Netherlands, right? I was there last summer. I'd love to have a job there, certainly. It's a wonderful country. However, as an American with zero connection to the country, I'm not going to be hired by anyone, regardless of qualifications or experience. This goes for pretty much the whole EU.
Quote
This one, again found in 5 min. of searching, has similar req. as for Epik.
https://www.wantedinrome.com/classified/english-teachers-required-in-rome-immediate-start-2-2.html
It didn't take me 5 minutes of reading that post to see the part about 'working papers or visa a must!' Not exactly similar to EPIK, is it?

Americans and Canadians are the majority of posters on this forum and we aren't getting jobs of any kind, anywhere in the EU without a heck of a lot of trouble, marrying a local, or a huge stack of qualifications and home country experience in order to work at real international schools. If Cohort can show some evidence to the contrary, please do.

As for replicating his happy tale of support, remuneration and ease of employment in the US, I'm sorry to say I just don't think he gets it. You cannot just call up principals and say, hey, I've taught ESL for 5 years in Korea, can you hire me to work in your school while you pay me to get my teaching qualification? If that really does work in the EU, well, again, congratulations, but as with health care, we're a bit behind.

I am going to go back fairly shortly, but my path requires me to save up, pay for tuition at a local university, spend around 2 years getting an MA in teaching, and then finally get a license AFTER that. Exactly zero USD will be prepaid by any local school district, they'd be insane to do such a thing. I won't probably even step into a US classroom until I've done 2 full semesters of coursework in the MA program, and this is with about 8 years of experience teaching in Asia. You have to go through the system. The shortcuts and 'alternative paths' do exist, but they're narrow and particular from state to state and basically all have substantial drawbacks, restrictions or limitations. My co worker now got an entry license from Utah but she can't transfer or renew it, because it was a loophole and they just closed it. Everyone knows about Teachnow and TeacherReady, they're almost as worthless as they sound.

The reason the US is hurting for teachers is because it's often a poorly paid and overworked life there. You may have heard about the teacher strikes in various states in the last couple years. Read some American teacher forums and see what they say...it's not pretty. I'm getting my license and coming right back over here, I'm not interested in that life.

Quote
there are a lot of private language institutes there as well you could try.
HAHAHA. Have you ever even been in the US? I worked in three different examples of those, at the same time actually. Those jobs are garbage. No benefits, semester to semester contracts, located halfway across the city from each other so you spend hours commuting. Three together and I was making about half what I make now and barely had any time off. When you did get time off it was unpaid. I was an adjunct university instructor in 2 different colleges doing actually very good teaching, kids and staff liked me, my reward was nothing more than a contract extension. No raise, no security, no benefits.

The ONLY route to any decent job in ESL in the US is through an education degree that you have finance yourself, and a license to teach elementary or secondary. That's it. I'm very happy the Netherlands has such an enlightened attitude to education and supporting its citizens, but it doesn't do me or most others any good at all to read about it here. We can do nothing but envy you.