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  • LIC
  • Expert Waygook

    • 849

    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
    • NE Hemisphere
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2019, 09:53:49 pm »
I felt, and was truly, appreciated by my co-teachers, fellow colleagues, VP's, and principals.

Only one PE teacher wasn't nice but who cares about dumb failed jocks.

The last year's principal, the only female one I hadn't,tried to treat me poorly and I threatened to quit. She backed down and kinda respected me after that.


Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #21 on: December 27, 2019, 03:32:17 pm »
I've  taught in Korea for the last 12 years and I felt appreciated by my co-teachers and supervisors 90% of the time. 

Never stopped me from getting "let go"  when some random new principal took over or some random new DOE administrator got elected and cut funding.  Some of the schools that loved me the most had no choice but to kick me to the curb.

Lesson learned?  "No good deed goes unpunished" lol  There are no incentives to perform with excellence built into the system (only those YOU bring to the table).

I still give it my all for every lesson because I work for the kids, not the accolades.  BUT!

No upward mobility.  No job security.  No reason to stay..."Great job! You're fired!" lol.

Final 2 months in Korea.  Not coming back.  The job market has been declining for 10 years....Not going to suddenly swing up.  Just getting worse.

save $5 on iherb by using discount code TCB077  !

1. Be good 2. Be nice  3. Be clean


  • Cyanea
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1346

    • September 04, 2016, 01:48:24 pm
    • Las Vegas
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2019, 12:09:52 am »
Lesson learned?  "No good deed goes unpunished"

or, "the nail that sticks out gets hammered down". 

You excel, you invite the jealousy of your coT or supervisor. Got ability or qualifications? Shhh, they find it threatening.



Catch my drift?


  • NorthStar
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1287

    • July 05, 2017, 10:54:06 am
    • Mouseville
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2019, 10:06:20 am »
While I was at my first school, as bad as it was, the moms would bring us some treats at least once a week...pizza, chicken, a few thoughtful gifts  The boss, an "old school" Korean type of guy, would have the office manager take us out at least 4 times a month....to ease the burn(s) of working at that school.  The students would bring us gifts on our birthdays....things of that nature. 

This was some time ago....despite how bad the working conditions were, there has only been one other school, in which the owner/director showed a level of appreciation...and THAT, was a some time ago. 
« Last Edit: December 30, 2019, 09:41:36 am by kyndo »


Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #24 on: December 28, 2019, 06:12:12 pm »
I pretty much felt appreciated as a teacher when I was in Korea.
Never mind about that others outside the school community felt.
I just did my mission to help build kids minds out of the love for
what I do.


Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2019, 11:22:48 pm »
No.......never. The staff are hoping I leave because they always made it a point to last two teachers to not talk to them or for them to go to their hweshiks. I'm annoying them by staying and getting too "comfy".

Some 4th grade and 3rd grade students are glad I'm staying another year...

My clubs and activities Korean peeps are wonderful.


  • 303lmc
  • Veteran

    • 122

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2020, 07:52:58 am »
winter camp starts today. apparently I cannot take role by myself so someone will come and do it for me? {sigh}


Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2020, 08:15:41 am »
Although I do understand the need to prepare materials and for the POEs to ensure we are actually doing work....I don't feel appreciated when I am the only person at school during breaks.....I understand it to a degree but it still doesn't feel nice coming into an empty school.


  • lhelena
  • Veteran

    • 176

    • March 11, 2018, 01:57:14 pm
    • Anseong
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2020, 12:15:13 pm »
My school has made special announcements at lunch about every staff member leaving at the end of the school year except for me. So now I have to go around and let the students know myself which is uncomfortable and really depressing. I guess it just goes to show how little they really care.


  • saffaTeacher
  • Newgookin

    • 4

    • January 06, 2020, 01:09:16 pm
    • Gapyeong, South Korea
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2020, 01:18:41 pm »
Sometimes some the Korean staff are appreciative, but there have always been one or two that go out of their way to make life difficult. Kinda letting you know they don't really want you here. But I guess that's part of the package.


  • L I
  • The Legend

    • 4895

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2020, 01:18:47 pm »
winter camp starts today. apparently I cannot take role by myself so someone will come and do it for me? {sigh}

The person taking role is the person getting paid for the camp.


  • madison79
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1375

    • October 19, 2010, 01:26:04 pm
    • Interweb
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #31 on: January 07, 2020, 11:18:43 am »
I've  taught in Korea for the last 12 years and I felt appreciated by my co-teachers and supervisors 90% of the time. 

Never stopped me from getting "let go"  when some random new principal took over or some random new DOE administrator got elected and cut funding.  Some of the schools that loved me the most had no choice but to kick me to the curb.

Lesson learned?  "No good deed goes unpunished" lol  There are no incentives to perform with excellence built into the system (only those YOU bring to the table).

I still give it my all for every lesson because I work for the kids, not the accolades.  BUT!

No upward mobility.  No job security.  No reason to stay..."Great job! You're fired!" lol.

Final 2 months in Korea.  Not coming back.  The job market has been declining for 10 years....Not going to suddenly swing up.  Just getting worse.


That is the hardest part of working in Korea.  I disagree with the jobs declining.  I do see more and more 9-5 jobs for lower pay but that's normal. 
It's -ev to deal with some people.


  • 303lmc
  • Veteran

    • 122

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #32 on: January 07, 2020, 11:27:52 am »


The person taking role is the person getting paid for the camp.
they only came for the first day. but the librarian, poor thing, who is also forced to come in and host her own camp, is now taking role.


  • leaponover
  • Expert Waygook

    • 681

    • March 05, 2012, 12:08:16 pm
    • Iksan, S. Korea
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #33 on: January 07, 2020, 12:35:50 pm »
I have lived here for awhile too. I have felt appreciated. My co-teachers often thank me and offer to help me. Two of them wanted their kids to be in my English camp because they thought my camps were really nice. I took that as a compliment considering parents can be very strict with their kids education.  So over all I think they appreciate me but I don't think they understand how much work I actually do. I also think those who don't work close with me still think native English teachers don't need to work a lot but we defiantly do.

I definitely work defiantly.


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1713

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #34 on: January 10, 2020, 09:00:41 am »
It was once suggested to me that I was extremely helpful for literally trying to make lessons based on the textbook the school was using.

I had asked for a copy of the teacher's guide. There was only one that the main teacher needed to keep at school for themselves. I understood; I only went there once a week. So, I asked if I could just get a copy of the books the kids themselves used.

CoT: Why do you want those?
Me: I need to see what you're teaching them, since my conversation lessons should probably be based on what they're learning/tested on.
CoT: Oh. Wow. That will help me out a lot.

It felt strange being appreciated for something so absolutely basic for a teacher.

Really?  You must be teaching in a far off rural area.  When I did multiple schools in the countryside both middle and elementary, it was hard to keep track.  So, I never used the book.  In the bigger schools and in bigger cities, they pretty much expect you to stick to the book. 


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1713

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #35 on: January 10, 2020, 09:19:05 am »
If I were young starting out, I'd do Korea for a year for the experience and then spend that year getting ready to hop over to China.  You won't pay your student loans off on this low wage now or save up money if that's your goal.  Save money and use that to get yourself set up in a bigger city back home to start a career.  Korea won't let you do that anymore.  Pay has stagnated. 


  • madison79
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1375

    • October 19, 2010, 01:26:04 pm
    • Interweb
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #36 on: January 12, 2020, 04:29:14 am »
If I were young starting out, I'd do Korea for a year for the experience and then spend that year getting ready to hop over to China.  You won't pay your student loans off on this low wage now or save up money if that's your goal.  Save money and use that to get yourself set up in a bigger city back home to start a career.  Korea won't let you do that anymore.  Pay has stagnated. 

I so disagree with this that I'm going to rant like hell on it. 
You can save money in Korea and it's not that hard at all.  So many teachers come to Korea and waste their money on silly things.  You donít have to live like a monk either.  Yeah, wages havenít kept up but still.  Iím American so I canít say if this applies to others butÖ.
1st:  Not paying rent is huge for saving.  Most peopleís rent is about ľ of their monthly income if not more.  Cha-ching!
2nd:  Taxes.  Not having US taxes is another huge savings.
3rd:  You can get your loans deferred if you have high-interest debt. 
If you canít save money here in Korea, youíre probably making one of these mistakes and they are easy to fix. 
-Lifestyle creep:  The more you make, the more you spend.  Try to avoid this and cut back a bit.
-Drinking/eating it away:  Do you need to eat out and go out clubbing every weekend?  Why not make 1 weekend a month board game night.  I remember talking to a guy who made 4 million a month and he was like ďI donít think itís enough.Ē  He later said he spent well over 1 million at a bar each month and took a taxi to work each day/night. 
-Budgeting and sticking to it.  Set an amount and stick to it no matter what.  When youíre out thatís it. 
-Buying stupid stuff:  You probably donít need a new phone!  I went to the LG store and asked about a new 5g phone.  They wanted 80K won a month for 2 years.  Just think if I invested that money into high-interest savings instead.  My students got their minds blown when I explained that 1k won today could be 5k won in five years with a good investment.
-Donít buy a car:  Donít get me started on this.  You donít need it and why add the stress of driving here to the mix.  Take the bus. 
-Pay yourself first:  Make it a priority to pay yourself first.  The first thing I do after sending money home each month is to put money into my stocks, fundrise, worthy and savings account.  Then I pay my credit card bill and other things. 
It's -ev to deal with some people.


  • alexisalex
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1065

    • March 02, 2014, 05:10:24 pm
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #37 on: January 13, 2020, 08:57:54 am »
Couldn't agree more with madison79 above.

I always wonder how people are blowing so much of their money.  As long as you don't go crazy, you can save loads living in Korea even if you're on 2.1.


Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #38 on: January 13, 2020, 10:11:44 am »
To answer the main topic, no. Not at all.


  • JVPrice
  • Expert Waygook

    • 826

    • August 29, 2017, 10:26:13 am
    • Tampa, FL
Re: Have you ever felt appreciated as a teacher in Korea?
« Reply #39 on: January 14, 2020, 03:24:57 am »
I would say, out of the 4 schools I worked at, I was appreciated by teachers in 3 of them, and by students in 2 of them.

The teachers and staff at most of my schools were so friendly. One of my co-teachers thanked me after every single lesson I taught. One school's staff made it seem like they didn't even care if I was there or not (aside from the Principal and VP, they were always cool).

Half the students didn't care, or didn't show their appreciation if they did. It only becomes obvious when they give gifts, letters or have to say goodbye when you inevitably leave. Not many (at least for me) wanted to talk about these things in person.

Overall, I'd say 50/50 on the appreciation scale
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