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Life in Korea after teaching
« on: November 20, 2019, 12:45:36 pm »
I am here  on an F6 visa, and am in my 5th year of teaching with public school. I am really considering not re-signing a contract for next year because I am feeling quite burnt out and tired of some things. I will need to stay in Korea for the next few years at least, but I am not sure I want to continue with English teaching.

Are there any other jobs you have heard of other foreigners having?


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2642

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2019, 01:12:12 pm »
I've seen a lot of bartenders, cafe workers, and restaurateurs here  :lipsrsealed:


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2606

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2019, 01:25:29 pm »
I am here  on an F6 visa, and am in my 5th year of teaching with public school. I am really considering not re-signing a contract for next year because I am feeling quite burnt out and tired of some things. I will need to stay in Korea for the next few years at least, but I am not sure I want to continue with English teaching.

Are there any other jobs you have heard of other foreigners having?
teach adults? you can pick up some corporate classes for 50k a class (minimum)


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1645

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2019, 01:48:27 pm »
I was in the same boat you are feeling yourself in. I tried starting an online business, wasn't terribly profitable but it was fun and I learned a bunch of stuff. Service industry, starting your own business; cafe, restaurant, ??, not a lot of options. If your Korean is stellar you could try for other jobs, but keep in mind the workweek here is 52 hours and shitty benefits (short vacations, working Saturdays, etc).  Ultimately I chose to go back to teaching because of the benefits with teaching, but it can get soul sucking.

You may try to look for an afterschool job or corporate work, shorting work hours and decent pay.

There are some FB groups you could scout out and see if anyone is hiring, for example Foreign Entrepreneurs in Korea.


Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2019, 03:28:46 pm »
I see you double posted so I'll leave me response from the other thread here as well. Sorry I don't have any good advice.

I just recently received my f6 visa and hope you get some solid responses to this. I am too burnt out on teaching. Well...not teaching exactly, but dealing with Korean management at each job I've worked at. Just don't want to deal with Korean's in positions of authority...or coworkers for that matter. Such poor communicators regardless of their ability in English and the lack of common sense has just done me in.

Right now I feel like I have it about as good as it gets. A part-time job that pays well and a handful of easy private lessons that pay very, very well and work less than 20hrs/wk . Yet...I know I would rather be doing something else.

Hope you find something. Lead the way!!


  • SPQR
  • Super Waygook

    • 265

    • March 08, 2018, 07:04:54 pm
    • Canada
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2019, 04:50:05 pm »

The only non-teaching, successful expat businesses I have seen here are bars.

But there are other possibilities:

-embassy staff
-import/export
-restaurant

Most people I know with an F-6, including myself, opened a study room. This
has many benefits: low overhead, no middleman, 10M+won/month (if you
run it well). But it is still teaching.


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2606

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2019, 07:37:19 pm »
How's your study room then, SPQR? How long did it take to get going, how much free time do you have, pros/cons, etc?
Something I've thought about before, but at the same time..ugh


Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2019, 09:30:38 pm »
You could learn IT. Digital nomadism is on the rise. I taught here for 8 years, left at the start of last year with my Korean Fiance as I was sick of teaching. Learnt to Program, got a job in a company. Me and the then Fiance now wife decided we wanted to move back to Korea, so I broached the topic with my company of letting me work remotely. They agreed, so now I'm back living here working remotely from my apartment for a foreign IT company. All the niceties of living in Korea without the teaching part, and doing a job I actually really enjoy!


Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2019, 01:10:17 am »
Tunacookie. You learned how to program in under a year and are now working in your field remotely?if so, that is incredibly impressive.


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1257

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2019, 01:43:01 am »
I am here  on an F6 visa, and am in my 5th year of teaching with public school. I am really considering not re-signing a contract for next year because I am feeling quite burnt out and tired of some things. I will need to stay in Korea for the next few years at least, but I am not sure I want to continue with English teaching.

Are there any other jobs you have heard of other foreigners having?

Open a cafe, bar or restaurant with the idea of offering something special like an a American or European dessert or style of drink.

Blogging, YouTubing, or another reviewing. If you put proper effort and time into this you will get rewarded.

Work for a company you have an f6 Visa use its spoils.


  • SPQR
  • Super Waygook

    • 265

    • March 08, 2018, 07:04:54 pm
    • Canada
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2019, 07:12:17 am »
How's your study room then, SPQR? How long did it take to get going, how much free time do you have, pros/cons, etc?
Something I've thought about before, but at the same time..ugh

It took a couple of nail-biting years to get it going.  But now it is self-sustaining.
We still need to be vigilant and diligent, though.  The competition in this sector
is intense.

Pros:
-money is good. We already bought our apartment
-daily free time (work 2pm-9pm)
-no commuting
-no landlord
-no boss
-no bullshit
-no co-teacher
 
Cons
-Saturday work (middle school test prep)
-short vacations (usually around Chuseok and Seolnal)
-high property taxes
-dealing with mothers (but they're usually OK)

So, good things and bad.  But I would NEVER go back.


Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2019, 07:38:52 am »
Tunacookie. You learned how to program in under a year and are now working in your field remotely?if so, that is incredibly impressive.

Yeah I took a bootcamp course, took about 16 weeks in total to finish. Got hired pretty much straight away. There's that many unfilled programming jobs out there. That said there's not that many junior remote roles. I've been working in the field for about a year now so I guess my company trusts me to do my job while not being in the office. Of course there's also freelance web development jobs out there if you got the skills.


Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2019, 07:47:42 am »
Thanks for all the replies. I am the type of person that can see ideas in my head, but then can't properly execute them unfortunately....so right now I don't see myself opening a business or study room....although I have always wanted to own my own business......my husband works as a chef and can cook international cuisine and he does want to open a guest house someday....I would help him with that when the time comes, but he is not ready to make that leap yet.

As far as tutoring goes, how do you deal with Korean taxes etc?


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2606

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2019, 08:04:27 am »
How's your study room then, SPQR? How long did it take to get going, how much free time do you have, pros/cons, etc?
Something I've thought about before, but at the same time..ugh

It took a couple of nail-biting years to get it going.  But now it is self-sustaining.
We still need to be vigilant and diligent, though.  The competition in this sector
is intense.

Pros:
-money is good. We already bought our apartment
-daily free time (work 2pm-9pm)
-no commuting
-no landlord
-no boss
-no bullshit
-no co-teacher
 
Cons
-Saturday work (middle school test prep)
-short vacations (usually around Chuseok and Seolnal)
-high property taxes
-dealing with mothers (but they're usually OK)

So, good things and bad.  But I would NEVER go back.
nice one. how did you go about choosing location? why do you think it started to take off only after two years?


  • SPQR
  • Super Waygook

    • 265

    • March 08, 2018, 07:04:54 pm
    • Canada
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2019, 10:04:00 am »

nice one. how did you go about choosing location? why do you think it started to take off only after two years?


We chose the location based on apartment complex size.  It is a numbers
game.  Percentage of families that have kids etc.

In the first year we struggled.  Almost went broke. The second year, as a
result of advertising, we got better known and grew.


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2606

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2019, 10:05:04 am »
that's great. glad it worked out!


Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2019, 09:13:38 pm »
Tunacookie. You learned how to program in under a year and are now working in your field remotely?if so, that is incredibly impressive.

Yeah I took a bootcamp course, took about 16 weeks in total to finish. Got hired pretty much straight away. There's that many unfilled programming jobs out there. That said there's not that many junior remote roles. I've been working in the field for about a year now so I guess my company trusts me to do my job while not being in the office. Of course there's also freelance web development jobs out there if you got the skills.

Would love to find out more info about the bootcamp. Mind if i dm you?


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1499

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2019, 10:46:06 pm »
Life in Korea after teaching?

I have to exit the country no more than 30 days after teaching my last class.

After 17 straight years of living here, that is still the situation I'm in. (If only I'd shacked up with and tied the knot with a korean woman.)


  • T_Rex
  • Adventurer

    • 66

    • April 23, 2019, 08:10:20 am
Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #18 on: November 22, 2019, 10:55:29 am »
Tunacookie. You learned how to program in under a year and are now working in your field remotely?if so, that is incredibly impressive.
It's actually quite doable. I'll finish a coding boot camp course soon and have already been offered a job.

Returning to Korea or somewhere else in Asia and working remotely sounds appealing.

 


Re: Life in Korea after teaching
« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2019, 02:58:39 pm »
Tunacookie. You learned how to program in under a year and are now working in your field remotely?if so, that is incredibly impressive.
It's actually quite doable. I'll finish a coding boot camp course soon and have already been offered a job.

Returning to Korea or somewhere else in Asia and working remotely sounds appealing.

 
What progamming language are people learning these days?