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  • Cyanea
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1344

    • September 04, 2016, 01:48:24 pm
    • Las Vegas
Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« on: November 19, 2019, 11:05:23 pm »

Half of my students do not know about Harry Potter.  Good to see this craze finally dying.


Some of them have even not heard of Michael Jackson.

Catch my drift?


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 3817

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2019, 07:24:34 am »
ipod


  • Irv83
  • Adventurer

    • 42

    • March 22, 2017, 02:33:49 am
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2019, 07:24:49 am »
I do make it point especially at my middle schools to include music and movie references that they may not know. I think this is part of the cultural exchange that makes teaching a younger age group so great and the things that shaped my childhood.

I don't have anything against Kpop in general but its important for the kids to understand where these influences came from in particular hip hop!
Be excellent to each other!


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2019, 07:50:24 am »
I've had elementary students who don't know that Australia is "호주" in Korean.

Apparently, most Korean textbooks teach it as "오스트레일리아".


  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5843

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2019, 07:52:41 am »
I've had elementary students who don't know that Australia is "호주" in Korean.

Apparently, most Korean textbooks teach it as "오스트레일리아".

USA is pretty unwieldy and.......... it is a proper name, but it's not in a way?

Australia definitely is a proper noun. There's no translatable words in it. hahaha I don't understand the Hoju thing.
The first thing to say is that this is definitely not pyramid selling, OK?


  • stoat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1387

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2019, 07:56:50 am »
Quote
Half of my students do not know about Harry Potter.  Good to see this craze finally dying.

Yes but fortunately, they'll be able to survive on an endless diet of woke super heroes from now until they reach maturity.

Quote
Some of them have even not heard of Michael Jackson.

My university students had never heard of Madonna the other day, and she's still alive.  And no, I didn't expect them to, or think that they should, before DeMartino butts in, and I wouldn't expect American students to have heard of Seo Taiji either.  :smiley:
« Last Edit: November 20, 2019, 08:06:17 am by stoat »


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2019, 07:55:37 am »
Australia definitely is a proper noun. There's no translatable words in it. hahaha I don't understand the Hoju thing.
I'm not talking about English proper nouns.

I'm talking about how Australia is "호주" in Korean, but nowadays many students don't learn/know that name.

Similar to a time when I looked up flights to Japan on a Korean site, and got confused because it switched between "도쿄" and "동경" for Tokyo (and I'd only heard of it as the former).
« Last Edit: December 05, 2019, 09:26:25 am by slycordinator »


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 6028

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2019, 12:41:54 pm »
Australia definitely is a proper noun. There's no translatable words in it. hahaha I don't understand the Hoju thing.
Insofar as I know, it's actually unknown why Australia is "호주".  It's taken from the Chinese characters "濠州" (Trench country, or canal country), but weirdly enough is transliterated using the Japanese pronunciation.

This article phrases "wtf?" in an intelligent way, and along the way actually gives a pretty convincing reason why the USA is "미국" here in Korea.  :smiley:


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2019, 01:27:42 pm »
My university students had never heard of Madonna the other day, and she's still alive.  And no, I didn't expect them to, or think that they should, before DeMartino butts in, and I wouldn't expect American students to have heard of Seo Taiji either.  :smiley:

It's funny because my middle school students know OF Madonna. She's one of the names they spit out at me whenever I show them a pic of a foreign singer and I ask them to guess who she is.

They just have no idea what Madonna looks like or what songs she sung, lol. It makes me wonder how exactly they know her name.


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2019, 01:43:44 pm »
Australia definitely is a proper noun. There's no translatable words in it. hahaha I don't understand the Hoju thing.
Insofar as I know, it's actually unknown why Australia is "호주".  It's taken from the Chinese characters "濠州" (Trench country, or canal country), but weirdly enough is transliterated using the Japanese pronunciation.

This article phrases "wtf?" in an intelligent way, and along the way actually gives a pretty convincing reason why the USA is "미국" here in Korea.  :smiley:

Such a teacher's pet!! 

Actually, this morning I checked on this as I asked the Korean teacher when we were at the national tournament and he checked it as he wasn't too sure.  So I did a search on 호주는 왜 호주 인가요? and it came up with an article that seems to explain it, that it has the roots in Chinese/Japanese.  The Chinese is 澳州 which sounds like 'aozo' and the Japanese is 豪 州 which sounds like 'gō shū'.  But why now in textbooks they abandoned it for 오스트레일리아I have no idea.  Maybe it's easier just to say 'Hoju'. 

동경 is SinoKorean, so is of Chinese origin and means 'another capital east of the country' but has been used for quite a few places. 


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 6028

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2019, 02:03:14 pm »
Such a teacher's pet!! 
Better a teacher's pet than a pet teacher.  :azn:
As a lot of us have the misfortune of knowing.  :sad:

Actually, this morning I checked on this as I asked the Korean teacher when we were at the national tournament and he checked it as he wasn't too sure.  So I did a search on 호주는 왜 호주 인가요? and it came up with an article that seems to explain it, that it has the roots in Chinese/Japanese.  The Chinese is 澳州 which sounds like 'aozo' and the Japanese is 豪 州 which sounds like 'gō shū'.  But why now in textbooks they abandoned it for 오스트레일리아I have no idea.  Maybe it's easier just to say 'Hoju'. 

I read that a lot of Koreans prefer Hoju because 오스트레일리아 is "easily confused with 'Austria' "

Also,'Aozo' actually sounds halfway like Australia, so it seems bizarre that both Korea and Japan would pick the ideograms that sound nothing like it,
...and also basically just mean "a hole in the ground". Maybe whoever it was who named Australia actually met an Australian and felt compelled to dis his country.  :laugh:


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2019, 02:51:41 pm »
I read that a lot of Koreans prefer Hoju because 오스트레일리아 is "easily confused with 'Austria' "

I have a Korean friend who's a tour guide and he was telling me about the 7-night 8-day tour he'd just done in Europe that involved England, France, Italy, Germany and Australia.  I didn't feel the need to correct him, so kept the chuckling internally. 


  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5843

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2019, 02:58:17 pm »
I have a Korean friend who's a tour guide and he was telling me about the 7-night 8-day tour he'd just done in Europe that involved England, France, Italy, Germany and Australia.  I didn't feel the need to correct him, so kept the chuckling internally. 

1 Country, 2 cities, 8 days > HOLY HELL, I SAW 24 THINGS REALLY QUICKLY
The first thing to say is that this is definitely not pyramid selling, OK?


  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1820

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2019, 03:09:02 pm »
Australia definitely is a proper noun. There's no translatable words in it. hahaha I don't understand the Hoju thing.
Insofar as I know, it's actually unknown why Australia is "호주".  It's taken from the Chinese characters "濠州" (Trench country, or canal country), but weirdly enough is transliterated using the Japanese pronunciation.

This article phrases "wtf?" in an intelligent way, and along the way actually gives a pretty convincing reason why the USA is "미국" here in Korea.  :smiley:

Such a teacher's pet!! 

Actually, this morning I checked on this as I asked the Korean teacher when we were at the national tournament and he checked it as he wasn't too sure.  So I did a search on 호주는 왜 호주 인가요? and it came up with an article that seems to explain it, that it has the roots in Chinese/Japanese.  The Chinese is 澳州 which sounds like 'aozo' and the Japanese is 豪 州 which sounds like 'gō shū'.  But why now in textbooks they abandoned it for 오스트레일리아I have no idea.  Maybe it's easier just to say 'Hoju'. 

동경 is SinoKorean, so is of Chinese origin and means 'another capital east of the country' but has been used for quite a few places. 
A lot of words are borrowed from the Chinese/Hanja, which usually means the concept/name has been around for a long time (like over 100 years). New words that sound more English are again loan words, usually from English, in the last 100 years the Anglo-sphere has been the leader in new innovations. The reason why they use whatever word over another word is based on when it entered the language, and I guess current language 'fashion'.

There are conservative, and liberal, language forces that try to force their preferred word over the other. And it's just a matter of who wins the word battle. Some examples are 선전 vs 광고 vs cf, or 열쇠 vs 키, or차동차 vs 카, or 양복 vs 정장...


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 6028

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2019, 04:40:56 pm »
I have a Korean friend who's a tour guide and he was telling me about the 7-night 8-day tour he'd just done in Europe that involved England, France, Italy, Germany and Australia.  I didn't feel the need to correct him, so kept the chuckling internally. 
:laugh:


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4422

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2019, 06:52:30 pm »
I have a Korean friend who's a tour guide and he was telling me about the 7-night 8-day tour he'd just done in Europe that involved England, France, Italy, Germany and Australia.  I didn't feel the need to correct him, so kept the chuckling internally. 
:laugh:

Did he see the Warrnambool Boys Choir?


  • T.J.
  • Veteran

    • 225

    • June 09, 2011, 11:07:16 am
    • 서울 은평구 연신내
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2019, 07:37:00 pm »
Question on a students worksheet today:

The Titanic _________________ in 1912.
a) played
b) fired
c) sank
d) rode

She asked me, "What does Titanic mean?"
"An ignorant person is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."

"Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock."

-Will Rogers


Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2019, 09:47:57 am »
I made a general knowledge quiz, just to see what my students know, and was surprised that at least a few kids in every class could name Bob Ross.
One of the other things in the quiz was a picture of floppy disks, and not a single student knew what those were. The first thing they guessed was "post-it notes?"


  • shostager
  • Super Waygook

    • 306

    • November 06, 2012, 06:08:10 am
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #18 on: December 06, 2019, 09:55:56 am »
A student gave me a little picture she'd drawn of Bob Ross last year, and I was surprised she knew him, but apparently a good chunk of the kids know him as 밥 아저씨.

In the trivia game I just finished doing, I have Martin Luther King and Frida Kahlo - someone's gotten them right every class, although it takes some time (apparently our art teacher is a big fan of Frida, or so the kids say). I also had a kid once who recognized The Proclaimers when I used "I'm Gonna Be" in class.

I guess this is more things I'm surprised my students know? Haha


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2031

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Things from yesteryear that your students don't recognize
« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2019, 02:38:41 pm »
I made a general knowledge quiz, just to see what my students know, and was surprised that at least a few kids in every class could name Bob Ross.
One of the other things in the quiz was a picture of floppy disks, and not a single student knew what those were. The first thing they guessed was "post-it notes?"
Someone 3D printed the "save" icon!
Mr. C is not a bad person, in fact is quite a good person here. One of the best people on this forum if you really look at it
-Mr.DeMartino