Read 352 times

  • minmei
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • January 10, 2019, 01:09:29 am
Do you have rights in school housing?
« on: October 14, 2019, 04:22:22 pm »
If you are staying in an apartment provided by the school, are they allowed to enter even if you tell them not to?


  • minmei
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • January 10, 2019, 01:09:29 am
Re: Do you have rights in school housing?
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2019, 04:24:18 pm »
If you are staying in an apartment provided by the school, are they allowed to enter even if you tell them not to? GEPIK told me they shouldn't enter without your consent. But I'm not sure if that's up to their discretion or not. Like if you contact your school and tell them your sick, Can they enter your apartment to check?


Re: Do you have rights in school housing?
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2019, 05:14:52 pm »
Yes, you do have tenant rights, and no, absolutely no one has the right to enter your home without your permission (at least not without going through the proper channels first and having probable cause prior to that). It's still your private residence, and going into a private residence without prior consent by the tenant is considered trespassing, even if it's by the landlord.

With that being said, though, shady people from shady schools have trespassed into NETs' homes before (usually in secret, though, because they know it's illegal). One user even posted about her experience here a couple of years ago. She knew the landlord was going into her apartment without her permission because people at her school kept making comments to her about things they could not know about without having been in her home, and the landlord and school apparently had a very buddy-buddy relationship. She never did update us on what happened later, though, and I think there's a good possibility she did a midnight run (her school was pretty horrible).

Most schools, if they do anything at all, might have someone swing by and knock on your door to check up on you, and at worst whomever comes by to check up on you MIGHT, if you don't answer, make the assumption that you were dodging while on sick leave (which is quite frankly stupid since people who are legitimately sick could be at the hospital or even have chosen to stay with friends/family while they're ill... but petty people, petty dimes). They usually don't have the audacity to actually go into someone's home without permission like that, though, because if you manage to get evidence of it the penalty can get quite severe.

If you suspect they might try this, keep a camera on the door to catch them in the act (they have smartphone apps these days that can turn a phone into a motion sensor camera). I used my home laptop for this, once, when I suspected a roommate was sneaking into my room to "borrow" things (totally confirmed, too, lol).

Remember, just because people don't have the right to do something doesn't mean they won't do it. Safeguard yourself.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2019, 05:20:46 pm by Chinguetti »


  • minmei
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • January 10, 2019, 01:09:29 am
Re: Do you have rights in school housing?
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2019, 05:47:36 pm »
Yes, you do have tenant rights, and no, absolutely no one has the right to enter your home without your permission (at least not without going through the proper channels first and having probable cause prior to that). It's still your private residence, and going into a private residence without prior consent by the tenant is considered trespassing, even if it's by the landlord.

With that being said, though, shady people from shady schools have trespassed into NETs' homes before (usually in secret, though, because they know it's illegal). One user even posted about her experience here a couple of years ago. She knew the landlord was going into her apartment without her permission because people at her school kept making comments to her about things they could not know about without having been in her home, and the landlord and school apparently had a very buddy-buddy relationship. She never did update us on what happened later, though, and I think there's a good possibility she did a midnight run (her school was pretty horrible).

Most schools, if they do anything at all, might have someone swing by and knock on your door to check up on you, and at worst whomever comes by to check up on you MIGHT, if you don't answer, make the assumption that you were dodging while on sick leave (which is quite frankly stupid since people who are legitimately sick could be at the hospital or even have chosen to stay with friends/family while they're ill... but petty people, petty dimes). They usually don't have the audacity to actually go into someone's home without permission like that, though, because if you manage to get evidence of it the penalty can get quite severe.

If you suspect they might try this, keep a camera on the door to catch them in the act (they have smartphone apps these days that can turn a phone into a motion sensor camera). I used my home laptop for this, once, when I suspected a roommate was sneaking into my room to "borrow" things (totally confirmed, too, lol).

Remember, just because people don't have the right to do something doesn't mean they won't do it. Safeguard yourself.


They have trespassed once before on a national holiday that I did not have work. They got my landlord to open my door without my permission. I contacted my co teacher this morning 2 hours before work telling her I couldnt come and she said she would swing by anyway but I went to the pharmacy for a bit and I didnt see her come to my home. Everything was in order when I returned, but I noticed my door was unlocked. I don't know if she entered or not.


Re: Do you have rights in school housing?
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2019, 08:52:39 pm »
With everything that's been going on between you and this school, I think it would be in your best interest to talk to someone with more legal experience in Korea.

There are a few FB groups that specifically cater towards providing free legal consultation for people living and working in Korea. At the very least, they can tell you exactly what your rights and options are. If a lawyer is recommended, they'll provide you with names, although I can imagine that your case is a bit convoluted given the more criminal elements involved, and will probably have different avenues for you to pursue, depending on the details you provide.

I'll send the info to you in a PM.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2019, 09:02:41 pm by Chinguetti »


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1289

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Do you have rights in school housing?
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2019, 01:32:25 pm »
Yes, you do have tenant rights, and no, absolutely no one has the right to enter your home without your permission (at least not without going through the proper channels first and having probable cause prior to that). It's still your private residence, and going into a private residence without prior consent by the tenant is considered trespassing, even if it's by the landlord.

With that being said, though, shady people from shady schools have trespassed into NETs' homes before (usually in secret, though, because they know it's illegal). One user even posted about her experience here a couple of years ago. She knew the landlord was going into her apartment without her permission because people at her school kept making comments to her about things they could not know about without having been in her home, and the landlord and school apparently had a very buddy-buddy relationship. She never did update us on what happened later, though, and I think there's a good possibility she did a midnight run (her school was pretty horrible).

Most schools, if they do anything at all, might have someone swing by and knock on your door to check up on you, and at worst whomever comes by to check up on you MIGHT, if you don't answer, make the assumption that you were dodging while on sick leave (which is quite frankly stupid since people who are legitimately sick could be at the hospital or even have chosen to stay with friends/family while they're ill... but petty people, petty dimes). They usually don't have the audacity to actually go into someone's home without permission like that, though, because if you manage to get evidence of it the penalty can get quite severe.

If you suspect they might try this, keep a camera on the door to catch them in the act (they have smartphone apps these days that can turn a phone into a motion sensor camera). I used my home laptop for this, once, when I suspected a roommate was sneaking into my room to "borrow" things (totally confirmed, too, lol).

Remember, just because people don't have the right to do something doesn't mean they won't do it. Safeguard yourself.

In the west this is true.  In Korea I will assume things have changed recently.  But it use to be landlords could go in anytime as it was their building and rights.  I haven't had this problem myself, but had heard of it years ago with others.  Change the locks on your place yourself or change the door code and don't tell it to anyone.