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  • minmei
  • Waygookin

    • 23

    • January 10, 2019, 01:09:29 am
11 month firing in a public school?
« on: October 08, 2019, 04:52:22 pm »
I am currently working in a public school in gapyeong-gun.  Recently, my principal approached me with a paper printed on Microsoft word. It was basically a  resignation letter that he had written for me. He explained that the school has lost budget and they can only afford to pay 11 months of my 12 month contract.  So, they were gonna have to let me go without my severance pay or flight ticket home. It sounded fishy so I contacted gepik office. Lo and behold after speaking to gepik, they miraculously found the money to pay my last month. My question is what incentives does a public school have to do something like this? It's my understanding that 11 month firings only happened in hagwons. I thought my salary was paid by the office of education. They don't pay me directly and will not lose money by just paying me what they owe. Does anyone know why a public school would do this?


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 3994

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2019, 06:00:42 pm »
There could be a million different reasons.

Perhaps they wanted to allocate the remainder of their NET budget to another part of the school.

Or perhaps the principal wants to get a swanky new curved TV for his office.

Or maybe the school needs a new pint job.


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1645

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2019, 06:28:49 pm »
Probably the principal figured out a way to pocket some the money. They are almost as notorious as hagwon owners. If you renew be sure to change schools.


Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2019, 01:28:52 am »
Your salary IS paid for by the office of education. The school receives the money well in advance, and the principal is supposed to sign off on it so that the school's admin can transfer it into your account.

The principal was just being a dishonest asshat and was trying to embezzle the funds. This sort of thing is not as common in public schools as it is in private schools because it's a lot harder to get away with it, but it doesn't stop some idiots from trying.

Do as thunderlips says, request to change schools once the time comes. Submit a formal complaint on your way out, if you can.


  • NorthStar
  • Expert Waygook

    • 787

    • July 05, 2017, 10:54:06 am
    • Mouseville
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2019, 10:08:38 am »
Your salary IS paid for by the office of education. The school receives the money well in advance, and the principal is supposed to sign off on it so that the school's admin can transfer it into your account.

The principal was just being a dishonest asshat and was trying to embezzle the funds. This sort of thing is not as common in public schools as it is in private schools because it's a lot harder to get away with it, but it doesn't stop some idiots from trying.

Do as thunderlips says, request to change schools once the time comes. Submit a formal complaint on your way out, if you can.

Hang on....if you receive everything, and I mean EVERYTHING owed to you ON TIME, then just move on without causing a fuss...well, that is what I recommend.   When you change schools, the new one will certainly want a letter of reference....and even if you are the honest broker and the principle is  a tosser, the situation can easily be painted to project you as a trouble maker. 

That is only my opinion....


Public schools used to be THE place to to work...now, they are just as bad as hagwons.


Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2019, 03:05:00 pm »
Hang on....if you receive everything, and I mean EVERYTHING owed to you ON TIME, then just move on without causing a fuss...well, that is what I recommend.   When you change schools, the new one will certainly want a letter of reference....and even if you are the honest broker and the principle is  a tosser, the situation can easily be painted to project you as a trouble maker. 

That is only my opinion....


Public schools used to be THE place to to work...now, they are just as bad as hagwons.

I disagree with all of this. Public schools are definitely much more stable places to work than hagwons, and it IS a lot more difficult for dishonest folk working in public schools to steal from NETs. The attempted 11th month firing fraud that the OP is talking about is incredibly rare in public schools because it's basically impossible to get away with it unless the NET is extremely gullible and doesn't ask questions. It illustrates just how stupid the OP's principal is. His attempt was just so goddamn outrageous, and it speaks volumes about what kind of person he is.

If the OP was placed by GEPIK or EPIK, (s)he won't need a letter of reference. But even if (s)he does need one, it doesn't need to come from the principal. Literally anyone else that works at the school can provide one. And, honestly, would you trust that principal to give a proper reference? He's probably salty that his ploy failed to work.

The principal tried to steal from the OP in a very blatant act of fraud. And that isn't a private matter. It's a criminal one. It's in the education office's best interest to know what he tried to do. It doesn't matter that the OP eventually got paid because it wasn't because the principal decided to do the right thing -- he didn't have a choice. He tried and failed to steal from the NET, and when the NET questioned his claim and involved another person, there was only one recourse left to him.

I'd file the complaint so that they have that shit on file. This isn't a small issue. It's pretty ****** serious, and they either need to fire that principal, or they need to keep a close eye on him.

You're right, though, in many cases the situation can be flipped on the victim if the wrong people are in charge, and I can imagine the principal claiming that it was only a misunderstanding.

I guess that's for the OP to discuss with his/her coordinator. They might have already put this on file, or even begun some kind of process regarding it.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2019, 03:27:01 pm by Chinguetti »


Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2019, 03:36:50 pm »
There's also a small chance that the principal just doesn't like the OP and wanted to screw him/her in some way, even if it means cheating them out of a month's pay + severance. Like he didn't think the OP was worth the money, turned it into some kind of personal vendetta, and tried to use an 11th month firing to play it out. I seriously doubt this is what motivated it, but it wouldn't surprise me if he tried to use it as justification.


  • minmei
  • Waygookin

    • 23

    • January 10, 2019, 01:09:29 am
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2019, 04:05:57 pm »
Hang on....if you receive everything, and I mean EVERYTHING owed to you ON TIME, then just move on without causing a fuss...well, that is what I recommend.   When you change schools, the new one will certainly want a letter of reference....and even if you are the honest broker and the principle is  a tosser, the situation can easily be painted to project you as a trouble maker. 

That is only my opinion....


Public schools used to be THE place to to work...now, they are just as bad as hagwons.

I disagree with all of this. Public schools are definitely much more stable places to work than hagwons, and it IS a lot more difficult for dishonest folk working in public schools to steal from NETs. The attempted 11th month firing fraud that the OP is talking about is incredibly rare in public schools because it's basically impossible to get away with it unless the NET is extremely gullible and doesn't ask questions. It illustrates just how stupid the OP's principal is. His attempt was just so goddamn outrageous, and it speaks volumes about what kind of person he is.

If the OP was placed by GEPIK or EPIK, (s)he won't need a letter of reference. But even if (s)he does need one, it doesn't need to come from the principal. Literally anyone else that works at the school can provide one. And, honestly, would you trust that principal to give a proper reference? He's probably salty that his ploy failed to work.

The principal tried to steal from the OP in a very blatant act of fraud. And that isn't a private matter. It's a criminal one. It's in the education office's best interest to know what he tried to do. It doesn't matter that the OP eventually got paid because it wasn't because the principal decided to do the right thing -- he didn't have a choice. He tried and failed to steal from the NET, and when the NET questioned his claim and involved another person, there was only one recourse left to him.

I'd file the complaint so that they have that shit on file. This isn't a small issue. It's pretty ****** serious, and they either need to fire that principal, or they need to keep a close eye on him.

You're right, though, in many cases the situation can be flipped on the victim if the wrong people are in charge, and I can imagine the principal claiming that it was only a misunderstanding.

I guess that's for the OP to discuss with his/her coordinator. They might have already put this on file, or even begun some kind of process regarding it.


I would like to thank you so much for your response. Actually, the only reason this whole thing got resolved was because I contacted the GEPIK coordinator and he came to personally talk with the principal in front of me. There was a lot of backsliding once he was in front of the cooridanators. He tried to flip the script and tell them I didnt work hard. That my afterschool class had low attendance so he had to take action blah blah. Bottom line GEPIK talked to him directly and he miraculously found the money for the 12 month and flight ticket the same day. I wasn't hired directly by GEPIK though. I found this job through a recruiter and signed a GEPIK contract but I didnt go through GEPIK orientation


  • minmei
  • Waygookin

    • 23

    • January 10, 2019, 01:09:29 am
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2019, 04:12:18 pm »
There's also a small chance that the principal just doesn't like the OP and wanted to screw him/her in some way, even if it means cheating them out of a month's pay + severance. Like he didn't think the OP was worth the money, turned it into some kind of personal vendetta, and tried to use an 11th month firing to play it out. I seriously doubt this is what motivated it, but it wouldn't surprise me if he tried to use it as justification.


This doesn't seem
Hang on....if you receive everything, and I mean EVERYTHING owed to you ON TIME, then just move on without causing a fuss...well, that is what I recommend.   When you change schools, the new one will certainly want a letter of reference....and even if you are the honest broker and the principle is  a tosser, the situation can easily be painted to project you as a trouble maker. 

That is only my opinion....


Public schools used to be THE place to to work...now, they are just as bad as hagwons.

I disagree with all of this. Public schools are definitely much more stable places to work than hagwons, and it IS a lot more difficult for dishonest folk working in public schools to steal from NETs. The attempted 11th month firing fraud that the OP is talking about is incredibly rare in public schools because it's basically impossible to get away with it unless the NET is extremely gullible and doesn't ask questions. It illustrates just how stupid the OP's principal is. His attempt was just so goddamn outrageous, and it speaks volumes about what kind of person he is.

If the OP was placed by GEPIK or EPIK, (s)he won't need a letter of reference. But even if (s)he does need one, it doesn't need to come from the principal. Literally anyone else that works at the school can provide one. And, honestly, would you trust that principal to give a proper reference? He's probably salty that his ploy failed to work.

The principal tried to steal from the OP in a very blatant act of fraud. And that isn't a private matter. It's a criminal one. It's in the education office's best interest to know what he tried to do. It doesn't matter that the OP eventually got paid because it wasn't because the principal decided to do the right thing -- he didn't have a choice. He tried and failed to steal from the NET, and when the NET questioned his claim and involved another person, there was only one recourse left to him.

I'd file the complaint so that they have that shit on file. This isn't a small issue. It's pretty ****** serious, and they either need to fire that principal, or they need to keep a close eye on him.

You're right, though, in many cases the situation can be flipped on the victim if the wrong people are in charge, and I can imagine the principal claiming that it was only a misunderstanding.

I guess that's for the OP to discuss with his/her coordinator. They might have already put this on file, or even begun some kind of process regarding it.


I would like to thank you so much for your response. Actually, the only reason this whole thing got resolved was because I contacted the GEPIK coordinator and he came to personally talk with the principal in front of me. There was a lot of backsliding once he was in front of the cooridanators. He tried to flip the script and tell them I didnt work hard. That my afterschool class had low attendance so he had to take action blah blah. Bottom line GEPIK talked to him directly and he miraculously found the money for the 12 month and flight ticket the same day. I wasn't hired directly by GEPIK though. I found this job through a recruiter and signed a GEPIK contract but I didnt go through GEPIK orientation. The thing is the principal told the other Korean teachers not to talk to me anymore. He created a new policy that everything said to the NET has to be said in front of everyone. He told the coworkers that I was lazy and to monitor me. So, I doubt I'll get a good reference from anyone in that school. But if worst comes to worse, I'll just go home or look for a hagwon job. That is if another gepik school will not hire me


  • NorthStar
  • Expert Waygook

    • 787

    • July 05, 2017, 10:54:06 am
    • Mouseville
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2019, 05:30:54 pm »
Hang on....if you receive everything, and I mean EVERYTHING owed to you ON TIME, then just move on without causing a fuss...well, that is what I recommend.   When you change schools, the new one will certainly want a letter of reference....and even if you are the honest broker and the principle is  a tosser, the situation can easily be painted to project you as a trouble maker. 

That is only my opinion....


Public schools used to be THE place to to work...now, they are just as bad as hagwons.

I disagree with all of this. Public schools are definitely much more stable places to work than hagwons, and it IS a lot more difficult for dishonest folk working in public schools to steal from NETs. The attempted 11th month firing fraud that the OP is talking about is incredibly rare in public schools because it's basically impossible to get away with it unless the NET is extremely gullible and doesn't ask questions. It illustrates just how stupid the OP's principal is. His attempt was just so goddamn outrageous, and it speaks volumes about what kind of person he is.

If the OP was placed by GEPIK or EPIK, (s)he won't need a letter of reference. But even if (s)he does need one, it doesn't need to come from the principal. Literally anyone else that works at the school can provide one. And, honestly, would you trust that principal to give a proper reference? He's probably salty that his ploy failed to work.

The principal tried to steal from the OP in a very blatant act of fraud. And that isn't a private matter. It's a criminal one. It's in the education office's best interest to know what he tried to do. It doesn't matter that the OP eventually got paid because it wasn't because the principal decided to do the right thing -- he didn't have a choice. He tried and failed to steal from the NET, and when the NET questioned his claim and involved another person, there was only one recourse left to him.

I'd file the complaint so that they have that shit on file. This isn't a small issue. It's pretty ****** serious, and they either need to fire that principal, or they need to keep a close eye on him.

You're right, though, in many cases the situation can be flipped on the victim if the wrong people are in charge, and I can imagine the principal claiming that it was only a misunderstanding.

I guess that's for the OP to discuss with his/her coordinator. They might have already put this on file, or even begun some kind of process regarding it.

OK..disagree.



Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2019, 09:00:44 pm »
I would like to thank you so much for your response. Actually, the only reason this whole thing got resolved was because I contacted the GEPIK coordinator and he came to personally talk with the principal in front of me. There was a lot of backsliding once he was in front of the cooridanators. He tried to flip the script and tell them I didnt work hard. That my afterschool class had low attendance so he had to take action blah blah. Bottom line GEPIK talked to him directly and he miraculously found the money for the 12 month and flight ticket the same day. I wasn't hired directly by GEPIK though. I found this job through a recruiter and signed a GEPIK contract but I didnt go through GEPIK orientation.

The thing is the principal told the other Korean teachers not to talk to me anymore. He created a new policy that everything said to the NET has to be said in front of everyone. He told the coworkers that I was lazy and to monitor me. So, I doubt I'll get a good reference from anyone in that school. But if worst comes to worse, I'll just go home or look for a hagwon job. That is if another gepik school will not hire me

Okay, then yeah, he got caught trying to embezzle funds, so now he's trying to save face by making you out to be the real problem here. He's probably afraid that word got out about what he tried to do, so now he's trying to do damage control to save whatever reputation he has. And to punish you for daring to stand up for yourself and go over his head. I mean, why couldn't you just take his word for it and let him steal your money, lol?

Record and document everything. It also sounds like he's giving you enough to sue for defamation, too, so you might consider consulting with a lawyer about it (just stay quiet about it if this is an option you're interested in looking into, don't even tell the coordinator about it). You can also continue speaking to that GEPIK coordinator who helped you and to get his/her input about the principal's current harassment. He's clearly trying to set you up so that he can justify rating you low enough to get you booted from the program. And you're still a part of the GEPIK program if you signed a GEPIK contract, even though you initially went through a recruiter. Both EPIK and GEPIK use recruiters to help fill their quotas. So don't watch and wait passively while this is going on. Keep your coordinator updated on what's going on.

Anyway, OP, I'm sorry you have to deal with that piece of shit.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2019, 09:12:49 pm by Chinguetti »


  • NorthStar
  • Expert Waygook

    • 787

    • July 05, 2017, 10:54:06 am
    • Mouseville
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2019, 06:39:45 am »
O.P.,

You have a just a few weeks to go....if the principle wants to play the "face" game and throw his toys in the play pen like a good Korean, to hell with him.  And, if the other Korean teachers cannot think for themselves and follow lock-step into his demands, to hell with them, too. 

Now, it is clear you will not receive any reference from the school.  But, you have the coordinator on your side (hopefully), whom of which, knows first hand what was going on.  So...you can just direct any curious party to him/her, when it comes to employment.  Anyone that can paint by numbers will be should be able to see though this....then again, this is Korea.

At this point...if you wanted to be prepared for any future fall out....it would not hurt to start the paperwork for legal complaints to expose this guy.  If he had just let it all go, no need.  But, he isn't so....perhaps an eye for an eye,in this case. 

However....check with your coordinator and see what he/she has to say.  If you WANT to stay with GEPIK and can slide into another spot somewhere without any hassle, then go for it.


Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2019, 07:17:18 am »
Chinguetti is on the money here.  This kind of thing in public school is very rare as opposed to hagwons, and even now the Labour Office is wising up to 11th-month firings for people who want to stick around and fight it.  The thing is, he got caught from a 'higher up', which is always more difficult than in a hagwon. 

They received all the money for you at the beginning of the year so that is apportioned through the year.  Usually, a school submits a budget report in January for the money they need for you for the proceeding year, this would be minus the flight ticket which gets done in real-time as it's a variable amount or you may renew which means they request the renewal bonus for you instead.   

One thing I've noticed in Korea is this person is probably like this is other people too.  If you have bad students, then they're probably the same with other teachers too.  As in, don't take it to heart.  If it's your first year then maybe your Korean is not good enough to listen to other teachers talking, or you're not close to your co-workers yet, but usually, Koreans can be fairly blunt about higher-ups they don't like.  From experience, I'd say this guy is a sneaky twaat to everyone.

If you don't stay at this school, and leave for good, then write some letters to his superiors at local level and also others above him at the provincial level about this, making sure you 'cc' others so they know that others are receiving the same letter.  I did this years ago with a horrendous native teacher in my city.  I wrote what I wanted to say about an incident he was involved in, asked my really good Korean friend to translate it into Korean ( no point in sending an English letter to people who wouldn't have a good or any English ability), sent it off to his P,VP, co-teachers, the city coordinator, provincial supervisors and one at national level I think.  Letting them all know others had received it.  If you're leaving for good, that is. 


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1645

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2019, 07:36:17 am »
Chinguetti is on the money here.  This kind of thing in public school is very rare as opposed to hagwons, and even now the Labour Office is wising up to 11th-month firings for people who want to stick around and fight it.  The thing is, he got caught from a 'higher up', which is always more difficult than in a hagwon. 

They received all the money for you at the beginning of the year so that is apportioned through the year.  Usually, a school submits a budget report in January for the money they need for you for the proceeding year, this would be minus the flight ticket which gets done in real-time as it's a variable amount or you may renew which means they request the renewal bonus for you instead.   

One thing I've noticed in Korea is this person is probably like this is other people too.  If you have bad students, then they're probably the same with other teachers too.  As in, don't take it to heart.  If it's your first year then maybe your Korean is not good enough to listen to other teachers talking, or you're not close to your co-workers yet, but usually, Koreans can be fairly blunt about higher-ups they don't like.  From experience, I'd say this guy is a sneaky twaat to everyone.

If you don't stay at this school, and leave for good, then write some letters to his superiors at local level and also others above him at the provincial level about this, making sure you 'cc' others so they know that others are receiving the same letter.  I did this years ago with a horrendous native teacher in my city.  I wrote what I wanted to say about an incident he was involved in, asked my really good Korean friend to translate it into Korean ( no point in sending an English letter to people who wouldn't have a good or any English ability), sent it off to his P,VP, co-teachers, the city coordinator, provincial supervisors and one at national level I think.  Letting them all know others had received it.  If you're leaving for good, that is. 


Oh shit Tekashi 69 in this mf!!  What did he do?


Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2019, 08:28:42 am »
Chinguetti is on the money here.  This kind of thing in public school is very rare as opposed to hagwons, and even now the Labour Office is wising up to 11th-month firings for people who want to stick around and fight it.  The thing is, he got caught from a 'higher up', which is always more difficult than in a hagwon. 

They received all the money for you at the beginning of the year so that is apportioned through the year.  Usually, a school submits a budget report in January for the money they need for you for the proceeding year, this would be minus the flight ticket which gets done in real-time as it's a variable amount or you may renew which means they request the renewal bonus for you instead.   

One thing I've noticed in Korea is this person is probably like this is other people too.  If you have bad students, then they're probably the same with other teachers too.  As in, don't take it to heart.  If it's your first year then maybe your Korean is not good enough to listen to other teachers talking, or you're not close to your co-workers yet, but usually, Koreans can be fairly blunt about higher-ups they don't like.  From experience, I'd say this guy is a sneaky twaat to everyone.

If you don't stay at this school, and leave for good, then write some letters to his superiors at local level and also others above him at the provincial level about this, making sure you 'cc' others so they know that others are receiving the same letter.  I did this years ago with a horrendous native teacher in my city.  I wrote what I wanted to say about an incident he was involved in, asked my really good Korean friend to translate it into Korean ( no point in sending an English letter to people who wouldn't have a good or any English ability), sent it off to his P,VP, co-teachers, the city coordinator, provincial supervisors and one at national level I think.  Letting them all know others had received it.  If you're leaving for good, that is. 


Oh shit Tekashi 69 in this mf!!  What did he do?
Also curious, haha


Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #15 on: October 10, 2019, 08:58:56 am »
Oh shit Tekashi 69 in this mf!!  What did he do?
Also curious, haha

Basically, he was one of those disgusting people that most of us have encountered here in Korea at one time or another.  One of those that you shake your head and ask 'why do you keep renewing this person?'.  All of my other friends at that time who met him were kind of 'christ, he's disgusting!'  The long and the short of it was that he used to go out with another native teacher to 'booking rooms' in our small city.  On one occasion, he went out with his friend and when it came time to pay the bill, the owner said a price which he thought was 'too expensive', so it all ended up in a brawl where the police were called.  These two teachers spent the night in a cell.  Both of their co-teachers were called at 1am or some time late like that, to inform them they were in the cooler.  But nothing seemed to get done about it, as his principal seemed to have his back.  So basically, I wrote a letter outlining this event as a 'concerned citizen' to the parties involved as well as others.  That was it.  Thing was he was a fokcing cheapskate as in, he'd steal toilet paper and other stuff from school so he didn't have to buy it.  That is why the 'too expensive' night at the booking room is kind of ridiculous as he hated paying for anything.  When he was drinking outside of GS25, if his students came past, he'd give them alcohol.  :huh: There are other things about him that would make you go  :huh:.  All of what I wrote was factual as it was an official police incident, but like most things in Korea these can be swept under the rug by the powers that be.   :undecided:  He didn't get fired, he just wasn't renewed, which is fine by me.

Also on the letter writing thing, years ago at my countryside middle school, cars used to hoon down the road as my students walked down what was basically a non-pavement.  I could foresee a big accident involving my students.  So I wrote a letter to the myeon office, gun office and provincial office about putting in some traffic camera or some way of slowing down the traffic.  I always get the idea if I only send it to one they can just forget about it, but more than one makes things happen.  As there had been a couple of student deaths in my city from traffic driving too fast so I didn't want my students to be a statistic.  I got a letter back a week later saying there was no budget this year for a camera and because it was a main road they couldn't put down speed bumps, but would paint the road red.  At least I tried.   :undecided:  I got my Korean friend to write it for me but I used my own name this time.  Actually, when we had our school graduation a couple of years later, the 'myeong jang' came to give prizes and he actually remember that I'd written this letter.   :undecided:


  • Cmorgan
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • August 29, 2012, 09:21:24 am
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #16 on: October 10, 2019, 09:29:23 am »
Hang on....if you receive everything, and I mean EVERYTHING owed to you ON TIME, then just move on without causing a fuss...well, that is what I recommend.   When you change schools, the new one will certainly want a letter of reference....and even if you are the honest broker and the principle is  a tosser, the situation can easily be painted to project you as a trouble maker. 

That is only my opinion....


Public schools used to be THE place to to work...now, they are just as bad as hagwons.

I disagree with all of this. Public schools are definitely much more stable places to work than hagwons, and it IS a lot more difficult for dishonest folk working in public schools to steal from NETs. The attempted 11th month firing fraud that the OP is talking about is incredibly rare in public schools because it's basically impossible to get away with it unless the NET is extremely gullible and doesn't ask questions. It illustrates just how stupid the OP's principal is. His attempt was just so goddamn outrageous, and it speaks volumes about what kind of person he is.

If the OP was placed by GEPIK or EPIK, (s)he won't need a letter of reference. But even if (s)he does need one, it doesn't need to come from the principal. Literally anyone else that works at the school can provide one. And, honestly, would you trust that principal to give a proper reference? He's probably salty that his ploy failed to work.

The principal tried to steal from the OP in a very blatant act of fraud. And that isn't a private matter. It's a criminal one. It's in the education office's best interest to know what he tried to do. It doesn't matter that the OP eventually got paid because it wasn't because the principal decided to do the right thing -- he didn't have a choice. He tried and failed to steal from the NET, and when the NET questioned his claim and involved another person, there was only one recourse left to him.

I'd file the complaint so that they have that shit on file. This isn't a small issue. It's pretty ****** serious, and they either need to fire that principal, or they need to keep a close eye on him.

You're right, though, in many cases the situation can be flipped on the victim if the wrong people are in charge, and I can imagine the principal claiming that it was only a misunderstanding.

I guess that's for the OP to discuss with his/her coordinator. They might have already put this on file, or even begun some kind of process regarding it.


I would like to thank you so much for your response. Actually, the only reason this whole thing got resolved was because I contacted the GEPIK coordinator and he came to personally talk with the principal in front of me. There was a lot of backsliding once he was in front of the cooridanators. He tried to flip the script and tell them I didnt work hard. That my afterschool class had low attendance so he had to take action blah blah. Bottom line GEPIK talked to him directly and he miraculously found the money for the 12 month and flight ticket the same day. I wasn't hired directly by GEPIK though. I found this job through a recruiter and signed a GEPIK contract but I didnt go through GEPIK orientation

If you don't mind me asking what recruiter did you use? Please PM me!


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1645

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #17 on: October 10, 2019, 09:42:25 am »
Oh shit Tekashi 69 in this mf!!  What did he do?
Also curious, haha

Basically, he was one of those disgusting people that most of us have encountered here in Korea at one time or another.  One of those that you shake your head and ask 'why do you keep renewing this person?'.  All of my other friends at that time who met him were kind of 'christ, he's disgusting!'  The long and the short of it was that he used to go out with another native teacher to 'booking rooms' in our small city.  On one occasion, he went out with his friend and when it came time to pay the bill, the owner said a price which he thought was 'too expensive', so it all ended up in a brawl where the police were called.  These two teachers spent the night in a cell.  Both of their co-teachers were called at 1am or some time late like that, to inform them they were in the cooler.  But nothing seemed to get done about it, as his principal seemed to have his back.  So basically, I wrote a letter outlining this event as a 'concerned citizen' to the parties involved as well as others.  That was it.  Thing was he was a fokcing cheapskate as in, he'd steal toilet paper and other stuff from school so he didn't have to buy it.  That is why the 'too expensive' night at the booking room is kind of ridiculous as he hated paying for anything.  When he was drinking outside of GS25, if his students came past, he'd give them alcohol.  :huh: There are other things about him that would make you go  :huh:.  All of what I wrote was factual as it was an official police incident, but like most things in Korea these can be swept under the rug by the powers that be.   :undecided:  He didn't get fired, he just wasn't renewed, which is fine by me.

Also on the letter writing thing, years ago at my countryside middle school, cars used to hoon down the road as my students walked down what was basically a non-pavement.  I could foresee a big accident involving my students.  So I wrote a letter to the myeon office, gun office and provincial office about putting in some traffic camera or some way of slowing down the traffic.  I always get the idea if I only send it to one they can just forget about it, but more than one makes things happen.  As there had been a couple of student deaths in my city from traffic driving too fast so I didn't want my students to be a statistic.  I got a letter back a week later saying there was no budget this year for a camera and because it was a main road they couldn't put down speed bumps, but would paint the road red.  At least I tried.   :undecided:  I got my Korean friend to write it for me but I used my own name this time.  Actually, when we had our school graduation a couple of years later, the 'myeong jang' came to give prizes and he actually remember that I'd written this letter.   :undecided:

Ah yeah good riddance. Perhaps you should incorporate letter writing in your lesson plans as it in now a lost art form. ;)


  • NorthStar
  • Expert Waygook

    • 787

    • July 05, 2017, 10:54:06 am
    • Mouseville
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #18 on: October 10, 2019, 11:30:48 am »
Oh shit Tekashi 69 in this mf!!  What did he do?
Also curious, haha

Basically, he was one of those disgusting people that most of us have encountered here in Korea at one time or another.  One of those that you shake your head and ask 'why do you keep renewing this person?'.  All of my other friends at that time who met him were kind of 'christ, he's disgusting!'  The long and the short of it was that he used to go out with another native teacher to 'booking rooms' in our small city.  On one occasion, he went out with his friend and when it came time to pay the bill, the owner said a price which he thought was 'too expensive', so it all ended up in a brawl where the police were called.  These two teachers spent the night in a cell.  Both of their co-teachers were called at 1am or some time late like that, to inform them they were in the cooler.  But nothing seemed to get done about it, as his principal seemed to have his back.  So basically, I wrote a letter outlining this event as a 'concerned citizen' to the parties involved as well as others.  That was it.  Thing was he was a fokcing cheapskate as in, he'd steal toilet paper and other stuff from school so he didn't have to buy it.  That is why the 'too expensive' night at the booking room is kind of ridiculous as he hated paying for anything.  When he was drinking outside of GS25, if his students came past, he'd give them alcohol.  :huh: There are other things about him that would make you go  :huh:.  All of what I wrote was factual as it was an official police incident, but like most things in Korea these can be swept under the rug by the powers that be.   :undecided:  He didn't get fired, he just wasn't renewed, which is fine by me.

Also on the letter writing thing, years ago at my countryside middle school, cars used to hoon down the road as my students walked down what was basically a non-pavement.  I could foresee a big accident involving my students.  So I wrote a letter to the myeon office, gun office and provincial office about putting in some traffic camera or some way of slowing down the traffic.  I always get the idea if I only send it to one they can just forget about it, but more than one makes things happen.  As there had been a couple of student deaths in my city from traffic driving too fast so I didn't want my students to be a statistic.  I got a letter back a week later saying there was no budget this year for a camera and because it was a main road they couldn't put down speed bumps, but would paint the road red.  At least I tried.   :undecided:  I got my Korean friend to write it for me but I used my own name this time.  Actually, when we had our school graduation a couple of years later, the 'myeong jang' came to give prizes and he actually remember that I'd written this letter.   :undecided:

So...despite none of that being your problem, you decided to be a rat...and pat yourself on the back...pseudo-hero, going on about second/third-hand information. 
« Last Edit: October 10, 2019, 11:35:07 am by NorthStar »


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1460

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: 11 month firing in a public school?
« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2019, 11:43:16 am »
Oh shit Tekashi 69 in this mf!!  What did he do?
Also curious, haha

Basically, he was one of those disgusting people that most of us have encountered here in Korea at one time or another.  One of those that you shake your head and ask 'why do you keep renewing this person?'.  All of my other friends at that time who met him were kind of 'christ, he's disgusting!'  The long and the short of it was that he used to go out with another native teacher to 'booking rooms' in our small city.  On one occasion, he went out with his friend and when it came time to pay the bill, the owner said a price which he thought was 'too expensive', so it all ended up in a brawl where the police were called.  These two teachers spent the night in a cell.  Both of their co-teachers were called at 1am or some time late like that, to inform them they were in the cooler.  But nothing seemed to get done about it, as his principal seemed to have his back.  So basically, I wrote a letter outlining this event as a 'concerned citizen' to the parties involved as well as others.  That was it.  Thing was he was a fokcing cheapskate as in, he'd steal toilet paper and other stuff from school so he didn't have to buy it.  That is why the 'too expensive' night at the booking room is kind of ridiculous as he hated paying for anything.  When he was drinking outside of GS25, if his students came past, he'd give them alcohol.  :huh: There are other things about him that would make you go  :huh:.  All of what I wrote was factual as it was an official police incident, but like most things in Korea these can be swept under the rug by the powers that be.   :undecided:  He didn't get fired, he just wasn't renewed, which is fine by me.

Also on the letter writing thing, years ago at my countryside middle school, cars used to hoon down the road as my students walked down what was basically a non-pavement.  I could foresee a big accident involving my students.  So I wrote a letter to the myeon office, gun office and provincial office about putting in some traffic camera or some way of slowing down the traffic.  I always get the idea if I only send it to one they can just forget about it, but more than one makes things happen.  As there had been a couple of student deaths in my city from traffic driving too fast so I didn't want my students to be a statistic.  I got a letter back a week later saying there was no budget this year for a camera and because it was a main road they couldn't put down speed bumps, but would paint the road red.  At least I tried.   :undecided:  I got my Korean friend to write it for me but I used my own name this time.  Actually, when we had our school graduation a couple of years later, the 'myeong jang' came to give prizes and he actually remember that I'd written this letter.   :undecided:

So...despite none of that being your problem, you decided to be a rat...and pat yourself on the back...pseudo-hero, going on about second/third-hand information.

I get that 'no one likes a rat', but assuming he was middle or high school, giving alcohol to students is really bad.
I'm very rarely a tattle tale but, if I saw another teacher giving alcohol to under aged students, I would contact someone about it too.

Outside of school stuff things, like the booking room thing. Well, that's something for the authorities / their school (if they get involved) to decide what they want to do about it; But, it could make other NETs look bad too, even if they don't do that kinda stuff.