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  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1540

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Typhoon Linling
« on: September 06, 2019, 08:13:37 am »
Thoughts and prayers for everyone, especially in Alabama.



Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2019, 06:11:25 pm »
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Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2019, 11:25:40 am »
I believe the Topic is TYPHOON Lingling... Not Linling...

 So why are you focusing on Hurricane (now Tropical Storm...) Dorian...?

As per the title: looks like Lingling's just getting started = pretty windy here in Seoul, and the South/SW of the country has been hit pretty hard already...!


  • zola
  • The Legend

    • 2742

    • September 30, 2012, 06:56:11 am
    • Korea
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2019, 05:23:28 pm »
I live in the South West and it was the same as every other typhoon. A wet fart, thankfully. The windows rattled for about 3 or 4 hours. It had stopped raining by 10am.
Kpip! - Martin 2018


  • Lazio
  • Veteran

    • 162

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2019, 09:27:18 pm »
I live in the South West and it was the same as every other typhoon. A wet fart, thankfully. The windows rattled for about 3 or 4 hours. It had stopped raining by 10am.

Here, just South of Seoul, we had strong winds pretty much all day. I didn't feel like it was very strong or extreme though. However my wife follows and internet cafe dedicated to people living in our city and neighboring cities. On that cafe, many people reported damage to their cars by fallen branches, broken windows on apartments and whatever crap being blown off from buildings and rooftops and falling down to the sidewalk or cars. Unfortunately, there were some casualties too. It's weird though that we barely had any rain, just wind. Being in the North-Eastern quadrant, which is supposedly where most of the rain falls.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2019, 09:29:00 pm by Lazio »


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1406

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2019, 11:04:22 pm »
Korean media forget to tell people that EVERY typhoon always weakens as it approaches the peninsula.

It is basic atmospheric science. Some English websites talk about projected strength, but Korean media talks about typhoons by Taiwan in terms of their strength THEN.

Lingling ended up a Category 1 typhoon when it arrived in South Korea, the WEAKEST of the five categories of typhoon.

I was here when Typhoon Maemi hit in 2003, the strongest typhoon in over 60 years, putting a car on top of a building, overturning several phone booths (they still existed and were used in the pre-smartphone era) and killed a mother and her son on my street by collapsing a brick wall on them huddled on their bed, my rooftop apt 4th floor door broken by a flying tree, 70+ people killed in this province -Gyeongnam- several of them unwisely remained and drowned in a basement nightclub in Masan, our electricity and plumbing out for over four days on Geoje Island. Maemi was a category 5 super typhoon before it weakened to still an incredible typhoon.

The media scaremongers for ratings about obviously lesser storms by neglecting to mention that Lingling AT TAIWAN being as strong as MAEMI WAS AT KOREA is a false equivalence because OF COURSE as the storm front heads north through cooler waters, it loses intensity.


  • Lazio
  • Veteran

    • 162

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2019, 11:53:35 am »
It is basic atmospheric science. Some English websites talk about projected strength, but Korean media talks about typhoons by Taiwan in terms of their strength THEN.

Lingling ended up a Category 1 typhoon when it arrived in South Korea, the WEAKEST of the five categories of typhoon.

Maemi was a category 5 super typhoon before it weakened to still an incredible typhoon.

The media scaremongers for ratings about obviously lesser storms by neglecting to mention that Lingling AT TAIWAN being as strong as MAEMI WAS AT KOREA is a false equivalence because OF COURSE as the storm front heads north through cooler waters, it loses intensity.

I haven't seen it anywhere what you are talking about. Yet, you are doing the same by bringing up that Maemi WAS a Cat5 storm BEFORE IT WEAKENED significantly by the time it approached Korea.

And get your facts straight! Some agencies estimate that Maemi had reached Cat5 strength, while others put it at Cat4 during peak intensity. Typhoon Lingling was also a Cat4 at peak intesity. In fact, Weather Underground puts peak winds at 133Mph for Maemi and 130Mph for Lingling which is basically the same strength.
Also, Lingling remained offshore 150+ kilometers and made landfall in North Korea as a weak but still Cat1 typhoon. That is after tracking through the cooler waters of the Yellow Sea.
Typhoon Maemi also made landfall as a Cat1 storm, although just downgraded from Cat2.
Yes, Maemi was a slightly stronger storm when it approached Korea. But the main difference is that it actually made landfall and did so down South, so it didn't lose it's strength rapidly. Had Lingling hit land in the Mokpo-Jindo area, it would've done similar damage to Maemi. And when a storm is over a thousand kilometers away, no models will tell exactly where it would make landfall. Better safe than sorry is what I say. After all, it is now being concerned the fifth strongest typhoon to hit the country since 1959. And again, it didn't even come close to make landfall.


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5070

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
    more
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2019, 07:50:23 am »
It seems it was a lot worse than made out by some here.

https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3772859


One of the most powerful typhoons to ever hit South Korea swept along the country’s coast on Saturday, toppling trees, grounding planes and causing at least three deaths before moving on to North Korea.

Typhoon Lingling knocked out power to more than 161,000 homes across South Korea, including on the southern island of Jeju, which was lashed by the storm overnight, the Ministry of the Interior and Safety said.

After hitting Jeju, the storm remained offshore as it moved up South Korea’s west coast on Saturday morning before making landfall in North Korea in the afternoon.

A 75-year-old woman in the central South Korean town of Boryeong was killed after strong winds blew her off her feet and crashed her into a wall 30 meters (yards) away, the ministry said. A 39-year-old was killed in the western city of Incheon after being crushed by a collapsed wall at a hospital parking lot, while a 61-year-old Chinese national died in the border town of Paju after being hit by a blown-off roof tile.

South Korea’s government said at least 15 people were being treated for injuries, including an elderly couple from Boryeong who were injured after steel scaffolding collapsed on their home.


The safety ministry said the storm was moving north at 60 kilometers (37 miles) per hour as of 10 p.m. Saturday while passing over North Korea. It had shrunk to a mid-strength typhoon with winds up to 29 meters (32 yards) per second, the ministry said.

Lingling packed winds of 196 kilometers (122 miles) per hour at around 6:30 a.m. on South Korea’s southern coast, making the typhoon the fifth strongest to hit the country since 1959, according to South Korea’s weather agency.



Residents in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang were seen using umbrellas to shield themselves from wind and rain while struggling to walk through wet streets.

In South Korea, the storm toppled hundreds of trees and streetlamps, blew signboards off buildings and damaged traffic signs across the mainland and Jeju. At least 18 homes were flooded and 35 vessels were capsized or damaged while being evacuated at ports, and more than 100 schools were damaged, the safety ministry said. More than 200 flights were grounded at airports nationwide, while 38 people were forced to evacuate from their flooded homes in Gwangju, a city near Seoul.

Ten cars were damaged in the southern town of Namwon when a roof plate blew off an apartment building and crashed into a parking lot. A similar incident in the eastern city of Wonju left five vehicles destroyed. A large spire was knocked off a church in a commercial district in Seoul.

“The spire collapsed after a sudden gust of wind, hitting a building nearby and a telephone pole and falling over a car. That caused electrical sparks,” Yeom Sang-min, a Seoul resident told, told TV news channel YTN.

Traffic to Incheon International Airport, one of Asia’s largest transport hubs, was disrupted by the closure of its gateway bridge and a power failure at a commuter rail network that links the airport with Seoul. Fire crews in Incheon responded to some 100 calls reporting typhoon-related damage, including destroyed walls, knocked-off signboards and fallen trees.

National parks were closed, as were southern ports on the mainland and major cross-sea bridges.

The storm could possibly inflict more serious damage as it passes through North Korea, an impoverished nation that for decades has struggled to deal with natural disasters. There were no immediate reports of weather-related injuries in North Korea, but state TV reported that an unspecified number of homes and buildings had been damaged and showed footage of flooded streets and toppled trees.

North Korea’s official Korean Central News Agency, or KCNA, said leader Kim Jong Un “urgently convened” an emergency meeting on Friday to discuss disaster prevention efforts and scolded government officials who he described as “helpless against the typhoon, unaware of its seriousness and seized with easygoing sentiment.”

Kim called for his military to drive national efforts to minimize damage from the typhoon, which he said would be an “enormous struggle” that would require the entire country to step up, the report said.

North Korea, which suffers from severe food shortages, was paying “primary attention” to protect agricultural crops and prevent damage in dikes, dams and reservoirs, KCNA said. It said officials were also moving residents in areas vulnerable to flooding and deploying “watchmen” to monitor bridges, buildings and houses.
There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5070

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
    more
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2019, 07:52:34 am »
It seems it was a lot worse than made out by some here.

https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3772859


One of the most powerful typhoons to ever hit South Korea swept along the country’s coast on Saturday, toppling trees, grounding planes and causing at least three deaths before moving on to North Korea.

Typhoon Lingling knocked out power to more than 161,000 homes across South Korea, including on the southern island of Jeju, which was lashed by the storm overnight, the Ministry of the Interior and Safety said.

After hitting Jeju, the storm remained offshore as it moved up South Korea’s west coast on Saturday morning before making landfall in North Korea in the afternoon.

A 75-year-old woman in the central South Korean town of Boryeong was killed after strong winds blew her off her feet and crashed her into a wall 30 meters (yards) away, the ministry said. A 39-year-old was killed in the western city of Incheon after being crushed by a collapsed wall at a hospital parking lot, while a 61-year-old Chinese national died in the border town of Paju after being hit by a blown-off roof tile.

South Korea’s government said at least 15 people were being treated for injuries, including an elderly couple from Boryeong who were injured after steel scaffolding collapsed on their home.


The safety ministry said the storm was moving north at 60 kilometers (37 miles) per hour as of 10 p.m. Saturday while passing over North Korea. It had shrunk to a mid-strength typhoon with winds up to 29 meters (32 yards) per second, the ministry said.

Lingling packed winds of 196 kilometers (122 miles) per hour at around 6:30 a.m. on South Korea’s southern coast, making the typhoon the fifth strongest to hit the country since 1959, according to South Korea’s weather agency.



Residents in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang were seen using umbrellas to shield themselves from wind and rain while struggling to walk through wet streets.

In South Korea, the storm toppled hundreds of trees and streetlamps, blew signboards off buildings and damaged traffic signs across the mainland and Jeju. At least 18 homes were flooded and 35 vessels were capsized or damaged while being evacuated at ports, and more than 100 schools were damaged, the safety ministry said. More than 200 flights were grounded at airports nationwide, while 38 people were forced to evacuate from their flooded homes in Gwangju, a city near Seoul.

Ten cars were damaged in the southern town of Namwon when a roof plate blew off an apartment building and crashed into a parking lot. A similar incident in the eastern city of Wonju left five vehicles destroyed. A large spire was knocked off a church in a commercial district in Seoul.

“The spire collapsed after a sudden gust of wind, hitting a building nearby and a telephone pole and falling over a car. That caused electrical sparks,” Yeom Sang-min, a Seoul resident told, told TV news channel YTN.

Traffic to Incheon International Airport, one of Asia’s largest transport hubs, was disrupted by the closure of its gateway bridge and a power failure at a commuter rail network that links the airport with Seoul. Fire crews in Incheon responded to some 100 calls reporting typhoon-related damage, including destroyed walls, knocked-off signboards and fallen trees.

National parks were closed, as were southern ports on the mainland and major cross-sea bridges.

The storm could possibly inflict more serious damage as it passes through North Korea, an impoverished nation that for decades has struggled to deal with natural disasters. There were no immediate reports of weather-related injuries in North Korea, but state TV reported that an unspecified number of homes and buildings had been damaged and showed footage of flooded streets and toppled trees.

North Korea’s official Korean Central News Agency, or KCNA, said leader Kim Jong Un “urgently convened” an emergency meeting on Friday to discuss disaster prevention efforts and scolded government officials who he described as “helpless against the typhoon, unaware of its seriousness and seized with easygoing sentiment.”

Kim called for his military to drive national efforts to minimize damage from the typhoon, which he said would be an “enormous struggle” that would require the entire country to step up, the report said.

North Korea, which suffers from severe food shortages, was paying “primary attention” to protect agricultural crops and prevent damage in dikes, dams and reservoirs, KCNA said. It said officials were also moving residents in areas vulnerable to flooding and deploying “watchmen” to monitor bridges, buildings and houses.
There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2019, 08:08:15 am »
I live near the west coast of Chungnam and we certainly felt it.  Over the Seohaean Bridge was gusting from 90-120 km/h, which in my books is fairly breezy.  I saw the massive metal roof get blown off the recycling hut in my apartment block and fly across the ground.  Anyone getting in the way of that would have been in big trouble.  I went for a hike about 6pm, when it had all pretty much died down, and the mountain where I usually hike was strewn with branches and debris across the path.  Some big trees had been blown down.  Workmen were removing a blown-down pole at an intersection. 

On the plus side, when hiking I saw a mountain boar and her baby.  Never seen that before. 


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1343

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2019, 08:18:14 am »
Where I was, you could hear the wind but, there doesn't seem to much any damage.
It rained heavily too but, it was mostly during the night.


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1540

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2019, 08:35:00 am »
I live near the west coast of Chungnam and we certainly felt it.  Over the Seohaean Bridge was gusting from 90-120 km/h, which in my books is fairly breezy.  I saw the massive metal roof get blown off the recycling hut in my apartment block and fly across the ground.  Anyone getting in the way of that would have been in big trouble.  I went for a hike about 6pm, when it had all pretty much died down, and the mountain where I usually hike was strewn with branches and debris across the path.  Some big trees had been blown down.  Workmen were removing a blown-down pole at an intersection. 

On the plus side, when hiking I saw a mountain boar and her baby.  Never seen that before. 


 :shocked: :shocked: :shocked:

Good thing she didn't feel threatened or it could have been ugly.


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5195

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2019, 10:09:52 am »
On the plus side, when hiking I saw a mountain boar and her baby.  Never seen that before. 
:shocked: :shocked: :shocked:
Good thing she didn't feel threatened or it could have been ugly.
Nah. Bacon and eggs usually get along well together.   :smiley:

Over here in Gyeongbuk, we got a bit of rain, and a bit of wind, but nothing serious. I went walking during the worst of it (dog was not impressed), but it wasn't terribly spectacular. Had some interesting sunset views afterwards, though!


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1540

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2019, 11:40:03 am »
On the plus side, when hiking I saw a mountain boar and her baby.  Never seen that before. 
:shocked: :shocked: :shocked:
Good thing she didn't feel threatened or it could have been ugly.
Nah. Bacon and eggs usually get along well together.   :smiley:

Over here in Gyeongbuk, we got a bit of rain, and a bit of wind, but nothing serious. I went walking during the worst of it (dog was not impressed), but it wasn't terribly spectacular. Had some interesting sunset views afterwards, though!

Not Korea, but they get this big here too.



Re: Typhoon Linling
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2019, 07:31:44 am »
I live near the west coast of Chungnam and we certainly felt it.  Over the Seohaean Bridge was gusting from 90-120 km/h, which in my books is fairly breezy.  I saw the massive metal roof get blown off the recycling hut in my apartment block and fly across the ground.  Anyone getting in the way of that would have been in big trouble.  I went for a hike about 6pm, when it had all pretty much died down, and the mountain where I usually hike was strewn with branches and debris across the path.  Some big trees had been blown down.  Workmen were removing a blown-down pole at an intersection. 

On the plus side, when hiking I saw a mountain boar and her baby.  Never seen that before. 


 :shocked: :shocked: :shocked:

Good thing she didn't feel threatened or it could have been ugly.

Yep.  Actually, they were about 30 metres away.  Wanting to make a natural nature noise, I farted, then the mum grunted and the kid ran off in one direction and the mum in another direction away from me.  So I descended the stairs slowly making sure I could see it the whole time.  Seen loads of deer and squirrels while hiking, but not so many rabbits.  I saw one yesterday, and I think that was only the second or third I've seen.