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  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2241

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2019, 10:47:40 am »
in an overlit 45pyeong apt?"

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous


Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #21 on: July 13, 2019, 11:19:11 am »
3.  Being able to walk into a normal pub/bar and NOT have to endure some STUPID K-drama on the TV.
Darn those Koreans for.....watching KoreanTV!

Just because the program is insignificant and uninteresting to you, does not make it insignificant and uninteresting to everyone else.

Anyways, now you know how people who don't care for sports feel.

But a Kdrama? Is anyone really watching season 3 episode 6 of "The Kim's Family struggles in an overlit 45pyeong apt?"

No. And the volume is usually not on anyway.

SO WHAT'S THE POINT?
Would anyone bat an eye if say, 'Breaking Bad' was on in the background or 'Game of Thrones' or 'Seinfeld' or whatever? It wouldn't bother anyone. Might even get people talking.

What looks to us like a bunch of people in some apartment can look to them like something else entirely because they understand its context and import.

I don't watch much KoreanTV, in fact pretty much the only Korean drama I've watched is 'Misaeng', but if Misaeng was on in the background, I wouldn't call it stupid (it was a pretty darn good show), and while it might just look like a bunch of people talking in an office, I would know pretty quickly which episode it was, the story, and it might get a conversation going.

Even 6 chess championships doesn't prepare you so well for the game of Go.
[/quote]
Ain't that the truth. I am okay at chess, but I am useless at Go.

I remember on Dave's (and I think on here as well) someone tried to knock it as some dumb game "just putting stones on a board" and I think someone else said it was just Othello. Never mind that when chess grandmasters in the early 20th century were first exposed to the game, they instantly recognized its significance and deep strategy. Smart people can usually recognize smart. Dumb people often have trouble with that.

When I first was exposed to Go, I called it stupid and indicative of the poor East Asian grasp of tactics and lack of focus on the schwerpunkt. Shows what kind of person I am.

It was over this that one of my good friends said a quote I have often used: "Just because YOU don't understand something, doesn't mean it's stupid."
« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 11:23:53 am by Mr.DeMartino »


  • Aristocrat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1791

    • November 10, 2014, 01:04:27 pm
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #22 on: July 13, 2019, 01:09:51 pm »
in an overlit 45pyeong apt?"

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'm guessing it makes the actors' and actresses' skin appear more vibrant and fairer.
Korea is still pretty nouveau riche and anything dimmer than floodlights probably doesn't make things seem new and modern.

The thing I find hilarious are the clothes and decor. The actors and actresses look more like they're wearing costumes than clothes; sometimes emphasis should be placed on making the show look authentic and in 2019, even rich people aren't going to walk around in a 3-piece suit, windsor knot and impeccably styled hair 24-7.
Looking at the decor, you're likely going to see the inside of the apartments decorated with Napoleon busts, fake Monet paintings and other manner of cliched, 1980's rich people paraphernalia.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1403

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #23 on: July 13, 2019, 01:16:39 pm »
Even 6 chess championships doesn't prepare you so well for the game of Go.

You're a six time chess champion? Where at?
My elementary school (Grade 4 vs. all grades)
My city Grade 4 elementary.
My province Grade 4. (Went to the nationals and had my *** handed to me: 2 draws, 2 losses, officially ranked 11th in Canada in my age group but was the second worst player in the room that day.

My middle school/high school (it was Grades 8 to 12 and no one ever beat me over the 5 years, though one teacher got a couple of draws out of me).

My city Grade 10 (I didn't go to provincials cuz i chose to spend that time with my girlfriend).

My university. I defeated the reigning champ in 15 minutes.

That all said, i have always found it hard to beat my dad, who taught me the game (he once beat a ranked champion at a chess club in Vancouver and they wanted/kept urging him to play with a clock (he never did), in tourneys,  so he stopped going there.

And the Internet chess sites are FULL of guys who beat me regularly.

So, given my dad, plus that day i was so much less than the others in the room at the Grade 4 nationals, plus the Internet... i am pretty humble about myself.

I have lost to great players in long casual fun games in BC, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and California. I have fond memories of games in the park or at homes late at night as i mentioned.

But i have been living in SK for a long time and away from Seoul or Busan, where i am sure chess clubs probably are fun and at a high level.

I got joy out of teaching students on Jeju when i taught my hagwon high level class five days a week (40 minutes each day they had with me, 49 minutes each day with a korean teacher - an elite academy that sent students to international schools on jeju and over my 7 years there some of the students i taught chess to went to american unis afterwards (u of kentucky, ivy league upenn).

I am now in a town of about 50,000 in Gyeongsangnamdo and teach each class only once a week, so i don't have the time to teach them chess (though i taught two who came early, before my first class of the day, and i had to increase my prep time then to accommodate their eagerness).

Note: if anyone here would like to spend 6-8 hours leisurely playing chess one day or evening (no rush, food, drink, discussion, challenging play), then a park or beach or other chillin' site i'd gladly meet up at some weekend. (I keep a chess set in my korando just in case...)
« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 07:44:54 pm by VanIslander »


Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #24 on: July 14, 2019, 04:19:03 pm »

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'd say the lighting reflects the typical Korean apartment. Every Korean apartment I'd lived in has had those big square ceiling lights pumping out the kind of light you'd see in a hospital surgery. Absolutely horrible if you want to try and relax  after a stressful day at work.


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2241

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #25 on: July 14, 2019, 04:31:58 pm »

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'd say the lighting reflects the typical Korean apartment. Every Korean apartment I'd lived in has had those big square ceiling lights pumping out the kind of light you'd see in a hospital surgery. Absolutely horrible if you want to try and relax  after a stressful day at work.
This is a good point. My MIL doesnt even have a lamp shade - just a bare bulb - and turns it on all of the time. Brighter than the sun. My wife insists on turning the main light on first thing in the mornings too. Infuriating


Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2019, 07:26:37 am »

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'd say the lighting reflects the typical Korean apartment. Every Korean apartment I'd lived in has had those big square ceiling lights pumping out the kind of light you'd see in a hospital surgery. Absolutely horrible if you want to try and relax  after a stressful day at work.
This is a good point. My MIL doesnt even have a lamp shade - just a bare bulb - and turns it on all of the time. Brighter than the sun. My wife insists on turning the main light on first thing in the mornings too. Infuriating

I don't think I've turned on the main lights in my current apartment, or the previous one.  Not sure I want snow blindness.  Horrible horrible things.  I don't even have the lights on full in my classroom, and my students are fine with that too.  Having the lights on full when eating was explained by a Korean friend, that they like to see what they're eating.   :undecided:


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2241

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #27 on: July 15, 2019, 08:28:34 am »
I've heard that too, but the main lights are SO bright here. It's like turning on floodlights. I should probably just change the bulb..


  • Mister Tim
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1529

    • September 08, 2013, 10:33:54 am
    • SK
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #28 on: July 15, 2019, 08:32:53 am »

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'd say the lighting reflects the typical Korean apartment. Every Korean apartment I'd lived in has had those big square ceiling lights pumping out the kind of light you'd see in a hospital surgery. Absolutely horrible if you want to try and relax  after a stressful day at work.
This is a good point. My MIL doesnt even have a lamp shade - just a bare bulb - and turns it on all of the time. Brighter than the sun. My wife insists on turning the main light on first thing in the mornings too. Infuriating

I don't think I've turned on the main lights in my current apartment, or the previous one.  Not sure I want snow blindness.  Horrible horrible things.  I don't even have the lights on full in my classroom, and my students are fine with that too.  Having the lights on full when eating was explained by a Korean friend, that they like to see what they're eating.   :undecided:

Maybe the bright lights are for those same vision impaired people who need the in-apartment loudspeaker announcements.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2019, 09:24:17 am by Mister Tim »


  • NorthStar
  • Super Waygook

    • 499

    • July 05, 2017, 10:54:06 am
    • Seoul
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #29 on: July 15, 2019, 08:33:12 am »
Quote
Darn those Koreans for.....watching KoreanTV!

Just because the program is insignificant and uninteresting to you, does not make it insignificant and uninteresting to everyone else.

Korean baseball is Korean T.V.

As a customer, it would be nice to request they staff change the channel (in a pub/bar) over to the Doosan game, as opposed to suffering through mentally derelict K-dramas or shopping networks...without them huffing and puffing (especially when there are only a few other folks there, NOT watching that crap, probably thinking the same thing) because they have to get up out of their squat, find the remote and make a change for paying customer who has an interest in a credible cultural activity. 

And, what is it to you?  Why should it matter to you?  ...a paying customer goes into a proper pub/bar that would more than likely have more customers if the staff were not squatting around, watching crap? 

This should be interesting...fire away, Doc.



  • 303lmc
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #30 on: July 15, 2019, 08:38:22 am »
regarding lighting...my apartment when I moved here was a disaster, broken light fixtures etc... so when I told the school they came put in the BRIGHTEST lighting ever. I told them it was too bright for me so they gave me some hanji to put over it. I have literally like 5 layers of hanji over each new excruciatingly bright light fixture. They even disabled the new one they installed  over the door that drove me NUTS because it was so sensitive it went on and off all day and night. I had several layers and even a black plastic bag over it. (They've had to come by several times to my place so far, broken window, new fridge ...)  I also bought the IKEA paper lamp for 10000W because I prefer soft lighting over 900+ lumens that sears my corneas and gives me an outright migraine. in the classroom I only turn on half the lights. but sometimes the kids will turn them all on and I can usually adjust, but once they are even halfway out the door all the lights go off!  but it's still not as annoyingly bright to me like the LED lights going in EVERYWHERE  in the states. I'm not sure why either.


  • 303lmc
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #31 on: July 15, 2019, 08:40:11 am »
regarding lighting...my apartment when I moved here was a disaster, broken light fixtures etc... so when I told the school they came put in the BRIGHTEST lighting ever. I told them it was too bright for me so they gave me some hanji to put over it. I have literally like 5 layers of hanji over each new excruciatingly bright light fixture. They even disabled the new one they installed  over the door that drove me NUTS because it was so sensitive it went on and off all day and night. I had several layers and even a black plastic bag over it. (They've had to come by several times to my place so far, broken window, new fridge ...)  I also bought the IKEA paper lamp for 10000W because I prefer soft lighting over 900+ lumens that sears my corneas and gives me an outright migraine. in the classroom I only turn on half the lights. but sometimes the kids will turn them all on and I can usually adjust, but once they are even halfway out the door all the lights go off!  but it's still not as annoyingly bright to me like the LED lights going in EVERYWHERE  in the states. I'm not sure why either.


  • lhelena
  • Adventurer

    • 71

    • March 11, 2018, 01:57:14 pm
    • Anseong
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #32 on: July 15, 2019, 08:43:22 am »
Living in a shoebox in a rural area I mostly miss cooking things I actually enjoy. I love cooking new things and experimenting with food, but since living here I've kind of just stopped. I've been so discouraged by mostly my kitchen situation but also grocery shopping here as a foreigner. My apartment kitchen has a sliver of counter space and a 2-burner gas range that was installed by a crackhead because it butts up to my back-splash.  So having more than one pot/pan on there at a time means the one in back is pressed against the laminate back-splash and half hanging off the burner. Not to mention the horrors of small town grocery shopping. If you go to small local marts out where I live you'll end up buying produce that's either already rotted or will be when you take it out to use it the next day. My friend just bought a bag of apples the other day and when she opened them they were all stuck together by rot. Going to Emart or Lottemart are the only good options and they're a bus/car ride away. And then not having an oven makes me want to cry every time I find a new recipe.


  • leaponover
  • Expert Waygook

    • 505

    • March 05, 2012, 12:08:16 pm
    • Iksan, S. Korea
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #33 on: July 15, 2019, 11:02:21 am »
Used to have a pretty decent poker league in town.  Free to play, and you got points for winning which qualified you for events where you could actually win money.  Also had a big organized event every year at a casino about an hour away.  I miss it, but was something I'd only do single anyway.  Not sure I'd take advantage of it now if they had it here.

I also miss a real bowling league.  The bowling clubs here are kind of lame.


  • NorthStar
  • Super Waygook

    • 499

    • July 05, 2017, 10:54:06 am
    • Seoul
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #34 on: July 15, 2019, 02:32:45 pm »
Quote
The bowling clubs here are kind of lame.


I feel ya...



  • Aristocrat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1791

    • November 10, 2014, 01:04:27 pm
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #35 on: July 16, 2019, 11:57:21 am »

3. Playing catch in the park. Mitt and ball, football or frisbee, it was easy back home to find someone EAGER to do it. Heck, one would fall into a pickup game of softball or ball hockey!


^This

I live in a more rural city and while there are parks, pretty much every one of them eventually becomes a walking trail, with cheesy ornaments all over the place. Don't get me wrong, many of the walking trails are lovely, but can at least ONE space be left as a bit of public grass a few friends to get together for a game of cricket, catch, frisbee, touch rugby or whatever?

Korea, recreation can be more exciting than walking slowly and taking selfies.


Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #36 on: July 16, 2019, 12:38:00 pm »
Korean baseball is Korean T.V.

As a customer, it would be nice to request they staff change the channel (in a pub/bar) over to the Doosan game, as opposed to suffering through mentally derelict K-dramas or shopping networks...without them huffing and puffing (especially when there are only a few other folks there, NOT watching that crap, probably thinking the same thing) because they have to get up out of their squat, find the remote and make a change for paying customer who has an interest in a credible cultural activity. 

And, what is it to you?  Why should it matter to you?  ...a paying customer goes into a proper pub/bar that would more than likely have more customers if the staff were not squatting around, watching crap? 
Well many do have baseball on. Also, many will happily change. Not too many get in a huff. The only reason I could imagine them doing so is if you're in Busan and want to put on a Kia game or something (or vice-versa). Either that or if some REALLY big drama was going on.

As far as the dramas not being worthy, that really is a matter of opinion. Now, I'm all for putting the ballgame on. But I also understand that if someone else wants to watch a drama, there has to be some sort of fair and equitable system where their opinion is respected. The way we see those "mentally derelict dramas" is the same way many people look  at sports. I mean, in the end, we are watching 9 guys stand around waiting for someone to hit a ball with a stick. Now to us there is so much more than that, but the same thing goes for two people in an apartment talking about a relationship. Just because I don't understand it or am not interested in it, doesn't make it stupid.

Also, what bar people go into, especially in Korea, has very little to do with effort by the staff. They could be mopping everything repeatedly or passing out fliers or trying out new recipes and it still would likely not matter. After a certain period, you really are at a point of diminishing returns for stuff you can do to draw in new business.

In Korea at least, I'd say a good 50% is down to location and concept. Another 40% goes down to advertising/media/awareness, which essentially amounts to someone famous/influencer mentioning your place.


  • 303lmc
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • March 05, 2019, 05:23:12 pm
    • Gwangju
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #37 on: July 16, 2019, 01:43:45 pm »
Living in a shoebox in a rural area I mostly miss cooking things I actually enjoy. I love cooking new things and experimenting with food, but since living here I've kind of just stopped. I've been so discouraged by mostly my kitchen situation but also grocery shopping here as a foreigner. My apartment kitchen has a sliver of counter space and a 2-burner gas range that was installed by a crackhead because it butts up to my back-splash.  So having more than one pot/pan on there at a time means the one in back is pressed against the laminate back-splash and half hanging off the burner. Not to mention the horrors of small town grocery shopping. If you go to small local marts out where I live you'll end up buying produce that's either already rotted or will be when you take it out to use it the next day. My friend just bought a bag of apples the other day and when she opened them they were all stuck together by rot. Going to Emart or Lottemart are the only good options and they're a bus/car ride away. And then not having an oven makes me want to cry every time I find a new recipe.
all of this! I used to cook and love it but now I rarely do. I did find coconut milk, green curry and fish sauce but getting not rotten produce is hard. I actually have a nice refrigerator now so i can fill it with food. i found a few really good places for food so I order a few things at once and heat them up as needed.
I'm about to find out where the E mart is so i can get some good produce hopefully


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1403

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #38 on: July 16, 2019, 02:02:03 pm »
I do miss an oven.
I also miss lakes.

But i know i'll just appreciate them so much more when i eventually return to my home country.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1403

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
« Reply #39 on: July 16, 2019, 02:02:20 pm »
Hobbies i appreciate here:

1. People watching (waay more interesting in a different culture);

2. Walking along the shore (back home i never lived by the sea or rivershore - here i have done so for a long time);

3. FREE TIME! Just having so much time to do things makes me feel like a kid again; tons of time to do little things, to wander, to be idle, etc.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2019, 02:09:37 pm by VanIslander »