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  • HappyPlanetAbuser
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Best description of life in Korea
« on: June 04, 2019, 12:05:42 pm »
People are basically friendly, even in big, crowded cities, unlike in many other places.And Koreans are often profoundly decent people. I’ve lost three phones in Korea, and misplaced my wallet twice. I got my wallet back, contents complete. both times; and twice I had my phones returned to me. I once left my phone on a counter at a store, and a clerk hunted me down through the telecom company, and sent it to my address - unasked. Other people have similar stories. It’s remarkable, and unheard of in other places. The underlying reasons for this and the attitudes they foster are part of the reason I love Korea, and Koreans.

- People like foreigners. You’ll like Koreans, too, if you take the time and energy to actively engage them. You'll make friends that stick with you for life, and you won't ever regret it. If you put in serious effort, it doesn't go unrewarded.

Fate and Decent Jobs

While life is good for foreigners with decent jobs, it's humiliating and awful if you don't have one. Ask a Sri Lankan labourer working 12 hours a day, 6 days a week for LG and see how good life in Korea is. People from the “West” or other rich countries call themselves "expats", while Sri Lankans or Indonesians are "migrant labourers". This delineates one of many naked class differentials in a society completely structured around class. The truth is that while every foreigner is migrant labour, some are treated well and others are treated like cattle. We participate in this game by emphasizing distinctions. It saddens me how higher-“class” migrants don't pressure the government to push companies into treating lower-class migrants better. This also applies to Koreans themselves, who are always judging foreigners based on where they fall in a complex matrix of class relations. This is a very, very dark stain on the Korean body politic. It's also true in many other places, but after so many bad examples, South Korea should know better. When you broach the topic with Koreans, they will often suck in their breath and nod, not knowing what to do about the people who do their "DDD" jobs. But the foreigners who are lucky enough to get good jobs also tend to forget that their foreign peers are often trapped in crappy jobs, and that they’re migrant labour as well.

The write-up is very balanced and on point. It covers all the happiness and bitterness Korea can give you. It is also very long, but spot on. The rest you can find here:

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-dark-side-of-living-in-South-Korea-I-have-heard-from-multiple-people-that-the-country-has-a-huge-dark-side
« Last Edit: June 04, 2019, 02:24:28 pm by HappyPlanetAbuser »
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  • Davey
  • Moderator - LVL 3

    • 1820

    • February 01, 2010, 01:36:20 pm
Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2019, 12:30:26 pm »
People are basically friendly, even in big, crowded cities, unlike in many other places.And Koreans are often profoundly decent people. I’ve lost three phones in Korea, and misplaced my wallet twice. I got my wallet back, contents complete. both times; and twice I had my phones returned to me. I once left my phone on a counter at a store, and a clerk hunted me down through the telecom company, and sent it to my address - unasked. Other people have similar stories. It’s remarkable, and unheard of in other places. The underlying reasons for this and the attitudes they foster are part of the reason I love Korea, and Koreans.

- People like foreigners. You’ll like Koreans, too, if you take the time and energy to actively engage them. You'll make friends that stick with you for life, and you won't ever regret it. If you put in serious effort, it doesn't go unrewarded.

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-dark-side-of-living-in-South-Korea-I-have-heard-from-multiple-people-that-the-country-has-a-huge-dark-side


Will give Koreans that--if you leave something valuable (even cash/wallet), chances are it won't be stolen (as long it's not a Western bar, lol).

Customer service is overall better than in the West I'd say, even though you don't gotta tip in Korea (Asia). Koreans/Asians don't really know the concept of queuing, though.

Koreans like foreigners? Obviously not all, but I think a lot of that has to do with the fact they see dollar signs when seeing foreigners.
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  • NorthStar
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Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2019, 12:41:16 pm »
Quote
Customer service is overall better than in the West I'd say

eeehhh....well, I don''t get upset when someone at Subway or which-ever choke an puke establishment mucks up an order.  It happens.  But, when they do get it wrong, I do expect them to fix it....not get mad at me because they loose face  for having to do it again.  That has happened numerous times.   Granted, that type of working environment sucks and folks make mistakes....no worries on that.  But, when I politely bring it to their attention that the order is wrong, every time, the Koreans get bent out of shape. 

Quote
Koreans like foreigners? Obviously not all, but I think a lot of that has to do with the fact they see dollar signs when seeing foreigners.

No...Koreans do not like foreigners. 


Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2019, 01:21:34 pm »
But, when they do get it wrong, I do expect them to fix it....not get mad at me because they loose face  for having to do it again.  That has happened numerous times.   Granted, that type of working environment sucks and folks make mistakes....no worries on that.  But, when I politely bring it to their attention that the order is wrong, every time, the Koreans get bent out of shape. 
I actually sympathize with it more at some franchise place where some 19 year old has been dealing with shitty customers for the last 6 hours. And eye-rolling and a shitty attitude can be found at fast food around the world.

Now at some independent local place? Yeah, that's your reputation and you're the owners ya'll. Not every place is like this, but I hear what you're saying with those local jobs. They need to step up their game and get their orders right and not throw a fit if they messup.


  • Davey
  • Moderator - LVL 3

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    • February 01, 2010, 01:36:20 pm
Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2019, 01:24:17 pm »
when I ask people to fix it here in Toronto...they get frustrated too ...I think it's human nature .

Koreans don't like foreigners ?  I don't like to say blanket statements , no offence ..as I said a lot of them do like them  because they see dollar signs.   

I'd venture to say the older generations understandably don't like foreigners, but the younger gens are cool .
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  • HappyPlanetAbuser
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Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2019, 02:17:22 pm »
Hard Knocks

Life is freaking hard for Koreans. There's a narrow path considered acceptable for Koreans to follow, and straying from it comes at serious social cost (note that many are willing to pay this cost and do, and you can meet them, too; they’re often amazing and very cool people). As a foreigner your life may be so-so, but the lives of your Korean friends goes from pressure to pressure to pressure. Integrate as much as you want, but be glad you're not local. If Korea is a great place to be a culturally adaptable foreigner, it's a brutal place for Koreans. Many Koreans want to leave not because South Korea isn't a politically free place, or because they face hardship or hard times finding good jobs. It's because of the constricting social culture.

You think you have it tough, the immigration office treats you badly, the government is hard to deal with? Your boss is a jerk, there's bad workplace politics and your boyfriend won't introduce you to his parents?

If you're Korean, you need to deal with this, and far, far worse: Much more hierarchical workplace abuse; fewer options for redress than you (believe it or not), because defending yourself can stigmatize you; obnoxious "seniors" (work, family, school, government offices, even social circles) that use their social power over you to browbeat or abuse you; there’s often no way to complain about problems, and those higher up, or in many kinds of relationships with you, can more or less freely abuse you.
And it’s not just hierarchical abuse. I’ve even heard numberless stories of dodgy relatives who scam family for money and get away with it, and business partners who cheat or run off with cash or business. The point is that all of that wonderful conformity often means Koreans need to put up with abuse and not be the one who aired dirty laundry in public. Because of this, social problems tend to fester in the darkness, instead of being solved.

Then there’s how class intersects with this low trust problem: I saw a case where a litigious rich snob sued a poor woman in a lineup because she accidentally spilled coffee on their expensive shirt, and it was entirely an issue of opportunist contempt, including the language and tone used.

There’s the painful and embarrassing quest for a marriage partner at predetermined age, after which you're basically trash, even if this age has gone up from, say, 25-26 for women to 29-30 these days (try being a 40 year-old Korean woman and talk about how much trouble you have dating). There are wives who expect husbands to be walking wallets and personal servants, and woe betide a man with the wrong or no family connections, he ends up being treated with contempt by everyone, especially women. When you get old, there’s a very real chance you'll be discarded by relatives and children who see you as a useless piece of parental refuse, though it could be that in the past, you were also imperfect - abusive, weak, over-compensating, or (insert social pathology here).

So the whole hierarchical order thing can be pretty oppressive in social relationships, and perverse, because the relationships and obligations often reverse without warning. A parent who was domineering or abusive may find themselves abandoned without means of support, or on the other hand a doting and wonderful parent may find themselves abandoned anyway. Your abusive former boss may end up coming to you in a few years looking for job connections and that professor who took advantage of you may be sidling up to you for a “deal” a year from now.

Koreans have to navigate a byzantine web of complex, competing and contradictory social relationships that are often totally opaque to outsiders - or even insiders, for that matter, which is much of the problem. Before you get resentful about not being Korean and never being able to fit in, ask yourself very carefully if you want to fit in.
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  • HappyPlanetAbuser
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Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2019, 02:21:21 pm »
The All-Seeing Eyes

All the time, everywhere, people are watching and judging you. People are deciding whether you are Acceptable. Are you High-Value? Are you pretty or handsome? Are you rich? What’s your social status? Once they decide what social category to put you in, they ask "are you behaving in the Proper Manner for your social category"? This never stops. Everyone is always judging you. Even when you “win”, you need to “maintain”.

Many Koreans very desperately want to exit Korea to get away from the judgmental eyes of other Koreans. You may be exempt from it for a time, but only for a time. The longer you stay, the more you’re expected to perform. But your Korean friends and relatives live as if everywhere is a small village, and everyone always has their nose poked firmly into your business.
Burning up your kids' future like there ain't no tomorrow! Trump 2200


Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2019, 02:56:52 pm »
While life is good for foreigners with decent jobs, it's humiliating and awful if you don't have one. Ask a Sri Lankan labourer working 12 hours a day, 6 days a week for LG and see how good life in Korea is.

"Good enough to stay in Korea"

Which goes for all of us.


Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2019, 03:10:09 pm »
Koreans have to navigate a byzantine web of complex, competing and contradictory social relationships that are often totally opaque to outsiders - or even insiders, for that matter, which is much of the problem. Before you get resentful about not being Korean and never being able to fit in, ask yourself very carefully if you want to fit in.
I agree with this. I don't get people who say they want to be treated like the Koreans are getting treated. I don't think many understand the full implication of that. Sure you get some things, but you also GET SOME THINGS. And those things generally aren't worth it. Like you said, it's a great place for someone who is culturally adaptive.

I wouldn't say it's necessarily as brutal as it's made out to be. A fair number of Koreans return and many get disillusioned with life abroad, but yeah depending on your personality here or abroad may be better.

Quote
All the time, everywhere, people are watching and judging you. People are deciding whether you are Acceptable. Are you High-Value? Are you pretty or handsome? Are you rich? What’s your social status? Once they decide what social category to put you in, they ask "are you behaving in the Proper Manner for your social category"? This never stops. Everyone is always judging you. Even when you “win”, you need to “maintain”.
Ehh, that's everywhere, not just Korea.


Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2019, 03:23:27 pm »
Quote
All the time, everywhere, people are watching and judging you. People are deciding whether you are Acceptable. Are you High-Value? Are you pretty or handsome? Are you rich? What’s your social status? Once they decide what social category to put you in, they ask "are you behaving in the Proper Manner for your social category"? This never stops. Everyone is always judging you. Even when you “win”, you need to “maintain”.
Ehh, that's everywhere, not just Korea.

 :laugh:

no, it's not.  we've been through this a number of times.  live in Scandinavia for a bit and then come back with this nonsense line.


  • leaponover
  • Super Waygook

    • 466

    • March 05, 2012, 12:08:16 pm
    • Iksan, S. Korea
Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2019, 03:24:26 pm »
Hard Knocks

Life is freaking hard for Koreans. There's a narrow path considered acceptable for Koreans to follow, and straying from it comes at serious social cost (note that many are willing to pay this cost and do, and you can meet them, too; they’re often amazing and very cool people). As a foreigner your life may be so-so, but the lives of your Korean friends goes from pressure to pressure to pressure. Integrate as much as you want, but be glad you're not local. If Korea is a great place to be a culturally adaptable foreigner, it's a brutal place for Koreans. Many Koreans want to leave not because South Korea isn't a politically free place, or because they face hardship or hard times finding good jobs. It's because of the constricting social culture.

You think you have it tough, the immigration office treats you badly, the government is hard to deal with? Your boss is a jerk, there's bad workplace politics and your boyfriend won't introduce you to his parents?

If you're Korean, you need to deal with this, and far, far worse: Much more hierarchical workplace abuse; fewer options for redress than you (believe it or not), because defending yourself can stigmatize you; obnoxious "seniors" (work, family, school, government offices, even social circles) that use their social power over you to browbeat or abuse you; there’s often no way to complain about problems, and those higher up, or in many kinds of relationships with you, can more or less freely abuse you.
And it’s not just hierarchical abuse. I’ve even heard numberless stories of dodgy relatives who scam family for money and get away with it, and business partners who cheat or run off with cash or business. The point is that all of that wonderful conformity often means Koreans need to put up with abuse and not be the one who aired dirty laundry in public. Because of this, social problems tend to fester in the darkness, instead of being solved.

Then there’s how class intersects with this low trust problem: I saw a case where a litigious rich snob sued a poor woman in a lineup because she accidentally spilled coffee on their expensive shirt, and it was entirely an issue of opportunist contempt, including the language and tone used.

There’s the painful and embarrassing quest for a marriage partner at predetermined age, after which you're basically trash, even if this age has gone up from, say, 25-26 for women to 29-30 these days (try being a 40 year-old Korean woman and talk about how much trouble you have dating). There are wives who expect husbands to be walking wallets and personal servants, and woe betide a man with the wrong or no family connections, he ends up being treated with contempt by everyone, especially women. When you get old, there’s a very real chance you'll be discarded by relatives and children who see you as a useless piece of parental refuse, though it could be that in the past, you were also imperfect - abusive, weak, over-compensating, or (insert social pathology here).

So the whole hierarchical order thing can be pretty oppressive in social relationships, and perverse, because the relationships and obligations often reverse without warning. A parent who was domineering or abusive may find themselves abandoned without means of support, or on the other hand a doting and wonderful parent may find themselves abandoned anyway. Your abusive former boss may end up coming to you in a few years looking for job connections and that professor who took advantage of you may be sidling up to you for a “deal” a year from now.

Koreans have to navigate a byzantine web of complex, competing and contradictory social relationships that are often totally opaque to outsiders - or even insiders, for that matter, which is much of the problem. Before you get resentful about not being Korean and never being able to fit in, ask yourself very carefully if you want to fit in.

Actually, the first Korean person I befriended in Korea only happened because of how depressed he was hanging out with Korean friends.  He was 29, doing various contract work jobs, and trying desperately to become a flight attendant but getting turned down due to his age and a little bit of scar tissue on a burned arm.  He was hanging out in the western bar by himself much earlier than the normal crowd.  I was one of only three people in the bar and we both commented about something on the TV and struck up a conversation.  I asked him why he was there by himself and he begin to let all his aggravation out.  He didn't like hanging out with his normal friends because he was tired of answering questions about whether he had gotten a job, met a girl et al.  He was just tired of feeling less than everyone else because he hadn't found his niche yet. 

Sad thing is he told me how the last thing he wanted was to be some corporate stooge.  Eventually he folded and got a job with Tom n Toms corporate office and moved to Seoul.  However, I see that he does get to travel a lot with them so hopefully he's happy.  We lost touch basically because I'm shit at keeping friends outside of the city I live in.  I've always been that way.


  • leaponover
  • Super Waygook

    • 466

    • March 05, 2012, 12:08:16 pm
    • Iksan, S. Korea
Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2019, 03:28:06 pm »
Quote
All the time, everywhere, people are watching and judging you. People are deciding whether you are Acceptable. Are you High-Value? Are you pretty or handsome? Are you rich? What’s your social status? Once they decide what social category to put you in, they ask "are you behaving in the Proper Manner for your social category"? This never stops. Everyone is always judging you. Even when you “win”, you need to “maintain”.
Ehh, that's everywhere, not just Korea.

 :laugh:

no, it's not.  we've been through this a number of times.  live in Scandinavia for a bit and then come back with this nonsense line.

So there's nobody in Scandinavia that plays "keeping up with the Jones'"?  It's a personality trait, not a cultural trait.


Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2019, 03:34:45 pm »
So there's nobody in Scandinavia that plays "keeping up with the Jones'"?  It's a personality trait, not a cultural trait.
Apparently no one in Scandinavia cares whether or not you're pretty or rich.   :rolleyes:

Hence why tons of rich dudes hook up with fat girls for their personality and hot women there are dating 40 year old fast food workers with beer bellies.

I mean, you can say things are less intense elsewhere, but to say that such things aren't everywhere is really ridiculous. Everyone judges everyone everywhere.


Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #13 on: June 04, 2019, 09:58:50 pm »
We're speaking in big generalizations, but I think it's fair to generalize Koreans as pretty competitive with each other.

I have several personal stories about this, which kind of  soured my general view toward Koreans.

Korea is only a generation or 2 away from extreme poverty.  They know what poverty is, and I think they're terrified of it, and they never want to experience that again.

As for foreigners...   people are tribal, the Koreans don't really want us here unless they have a personal economic reason to have us here.

To be fair, that's just people in general..  It's hardly unique to Koreans.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2019, 10:08:15 pm by guppy1000 »


  • grey
  • Hero of Waygookistan

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Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #14 on: June 05, 2019, 01:31:19 am »
I have not had luck with the TTC lost and found.

I left a pair of shoes on the overhead rack on a subway train in Seoul. I went to the station office and said what had happened. The guy there notified someone and I picked up my  shoes at that station after having lunch nearby. I was incredibly impressed with the technology and service that got me my forgotten item so quickly.

If I tried that on the TTC, Bombardier would delay their streetcar delivery by six more months.
Ko fills half his luggage with instant noodles for his international business travels, a lesson he learned after assuming on his first trip that three packages would suffice for six days. “Man, was I wrong. Since then, I always make sure I pack enough.”
-AP


Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2019, 07:29:17 am »
Quote
All the time, everywhere, people are watching and judging you. People are deciding whether you are Acceptable. Are you High-Value? Are you pretty or handsome? Are you rich? What’s your social status? Once they decide what social category to put you in, they ask "are you behaving in the Proper Manner for your social category"? This never stops. Everyone is always judging you. Even when you “win”, you need to “maintain”.
Ehh, that's everywhere, not just Korea.

 :laugh:

no, it's not.  we've been through this a number of times.  live in Scandinavia for a bit and then come back with this nonsense line.

So there's nobody in Scandinavia that plays "keeping up with the Jones'"?  It's a personality trait, not a cultural trait.

Once again, you fall into the same trap as Demartian.  I bolded the word, 'everyone' which is what he was agreeing with and it blatantly isn't true.  It's not an 'everyone' or 'no one' split, there are huge gray areas.  Korea, through its culture and society, is more superficial than other countries.  Fact.  Not all countries mind, but compared to somewhere like Scandinavia it 100% is.  I've lived in both for an extended time.  That is something he has a problem understanding.  Personality plays a small part in this, but culture and what you learn from your society and what's around you, plays a much more significant role in these things.  Like people aren't born racist, it's what's around them as they grow up and what they are taught, that influences them and sets their mindset for life.  Personality can play a small part in rejecting these external societal forces but on the whole how society expects you to behave and treat others within that culture is a strong definer in who you are. 

An example of Korean superficiality compared with other countries can be seen, for example, with Korean Air and Asiana Air.  All the air hostesses are in their 20s/30s, all without a hair out of place, looking perfect.  Is 'personality' responsible for that?  Of course not.  Koreans want to have someone pretty to look at and serve them on their flights, that is mainly why they're hired.  Even if that trumps them being able to do their job better than someone who is more qualified but less 'better looking'.  But they look good, that's the main thing.  Fly with Finnair, Lufthansa or Aeroflot (if you dare) and you get all sorts of older/larger/more rotund/balding employees.  Which is how it should be.  They are hired because they can do their job, rather than just them conforming to their favourable cultural identity.  It is like teaching here, if you're a tall, blond, blue-eyed female, you'll walk into a job, even if you can't teach.  Superficial image here trumps an 'uglier' person who is more qualified.  How often do people here complain about recruiters asking for photos with a job application?  You really can't get away with that in Europe, because it's discriminatory, but here it's the culture that still allows it.

Apparently no one in Scandinavia cares whether or not you're pretty or rich.

Everyone judges everyone everywhere.

Everyone or no one, Demartian?  We always come back to this again and again and again.  The tiny bubble you live in only allows you to see things in absolutes.  What you need to do...

A.  Travel around a bit, see the world, it's lovely.
B:  Live in other countries.
 
This would give you a bit of an educated perspective. 


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5111

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2019, 07:54:54 am »
Hard Knocks

Life is freaking hard for Koreans. There's a narrow path considered acceptable for Koreans to follow, and straying from it comes at serious social cost (note that many are willing to pay this cost and do, and you can meet them, too; they’re often amazing and very cool people). As a foreigner your life may be so-so, but the lives of your Korean friends goes from pressure to pressure to pressure. Integrate as much as you want, but be glad you're not local. If Korea is a great place to be a culturally adaptable foreigner, it's a brutal place for Koreans. Many Koreans want to leave not because South Korea isn't a politically free place, or because they face hardship or hard times finding good jobs. It's because of the constricting social culture.

You think you have it tough, the immigration office treats you badly, the government is hard to deal with? Your boss is a jerk, there's bad workplace politics and your boyfriend won't introduce you to his parents?

If you're Korean, you need to deal with this, and far, far worse: Much more hierarchical workplace abuse; fewer options for redress than you (believe it or not), because defending yourself can stigmatize you; obnoxious "seniors" (work, family, school, government offices, even social circles) that use their social power over you to browbeat or abuse you; there’s often no way to complain about problems, and those higher up, or in many kinds of relationships with you, can more or less freely abuse you.
And it’s not just hierarchical abuse. I’ve even heard numberless stories of dodgy relatives who scam family for money and get away with it, and business partners who cheat or run off with cash or business. The point is that all of that wonderful conformity often means Koreans need to put up with abuse and not be the one who aired dirty laundry in public. Because of this, social problems tend to fester in the darkness, instead of being solved.

Then there’s how class intersects with this low trust problem: I saw a case where a litigious rich snob sued a poor woman in a lineup because she accidentally spilled coffee on their expensive shirt, and it was entirely an issue of opportunist contempt, including the language and tone used.

There’s the painful and embarrassing quest for a marriage partner at predetermined age, after which you're basically trash, even if this age has gone up from, say, 25-26 for women to 29-30 these days (try being a 40 year-old Korean woman and talk about how much trouble you have dating). There are wives who expect husbands to be walking wallets and personal servants, and woe betide a man with the wrong or no family connections, he ends up being treated with contempt by everyone, especially women. When you get old, there’s a very real chance you'll be discarded by relatives and children who see you as a useless piece of parental refuse, though it could be that in the past, you were also imperfect - abusive, weak, over-compensating, or (insert social pathology here).

So the whole hierarchical order thing can be pretty oppressive in social relationships, and perverse, because the relationships and obligations often reverse without warning. A parent who was domineering or abusive may find themselves abandoned without means of support, or on the other hand a doting and wonderful parent may find themselves abandoned anyway. Your abusive former boss may end up coming to you in a few years looking for job connections and that professor who took advantage of you may be sidling up to you for a “deal” a year from now.

Koreans have to navigate a byzantine web of complex, competing and contradictory social relationships that are often totally opaque to outsiders - or even insiders, for that matter, which is much of the problem. Before you get resentful about not being Korean and never being able to fit in, ask yourself very carefully if you want to fit in.

As this comment is copy/pasted from somebody's blog, it might be a good idea to include a reference or a link... even if it is your own blog!
Less accusations of plagiarism that way!  :smiley:


Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2019, 08:03:23 am »
The Korean subway system is not the best transport in human history by the way. Hong kong's is cheaper and the trains are more regular. Why would you say something like that blindly?


  • AMDC
  • Veteran

    • 101

    • April 19, 2018, 08:00:49 am
    • South Korea
Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2019, 08:04:55 am »
Everyone or no one, Demartian?  We always come back to this again and again and again.  The tiny bubble you live in only allows you to see things
in absolutes.

Only a Sith deals in absolutes  :evil:


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5045

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
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Re: Best description of life in Korea
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2019, 08:13:30 am »
A
The Korean subway system is not the best transport in human history by the way. Hong kong's is cheaper and the trains are more regular. Why would you say something like that blindly?

And the system in Taipei and in Zhengzhou in China, dirt cheap, efficient and none of this mad pushing and shoving.
Everything is not as it seems.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!