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  • Aristocrat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1693

    • November 10, 2014, 01:04:27 pm
Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« on: June 03, 2019, 12:30:48 pm »
First part will be a bit of a rant.

Our apartment is near a pretty busy intersection and one of the nearby businesses is a beauty shop. The woman who runs the beauty shop has two dogs, which she lets runs loose around the busy intersection and the apartment block, while she works. Since there isn't much in the way of building regulations, or at least regulations which are followed, her business sits right on the corner of the street (no space for a pavement), meaning any cars taking the corner won't be able to see what's around it. The dog constantly runs in the road and I've seen a car slam brakes, trying not to hit it.

There are some pretty disgusting people in our building too, they don't even bother putting their rubbish in bags and simply toss loose rubbish in the general vicinity of the trash pile (food too!), seriously f*cking revolting people, but that's another story. The dogs delight in this and will rummage through the bags and trash, decorating the entire complex. I've gone to her business and told her to get her damn dogs, she'll just apologise, get them and next day they're back.

Part 2

Why are dogs so popular in Korea? Do people understand the responsibility required for a dog?
They're the least practical animal for the vast majority of the population as dogs: require large properties, constant attention from people who're always at work, need to do their business outside and can't be trained to use a litter box, are loud. Even those little rat-dogs are going to hate apartment life. An arab getting a pet polar bear would make more sense.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2019, 01:55:40 pm by Aristocrat »


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2068

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2019, 12:38:16 pm »
i don't think a lot of people realise how to treat them properly. for example, a student i teach has a dog, and in passing conversation, i asked him how many times a day his dog gets walked. he said... once a week. same with our old neighbours - they'd be outside the house 12+ hours, and when they got home, the dog would bark. all i ever heard was bark, bark, bark and then "조용히해!!!!"

this is all just just anecdotal, of course. but nobody i know here has even trained their dogs properly either. but then again, parents don't seem to train their kids either, so what do you expect...

on a semi-related point, what's with those dog carriers you see? isn't the point of walking your dog to allow your dog to actually walk? maybe i'm missing something


Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2019, 12:52:54 pm »
Beats me. I personally think rat dogs are borderline useless and big dogs need a lot of space and attention. Dogs in general are just a nuisance. At least cats generally know how to shut the eff up and mind their own damn business. That and they don't need to be walked and a good many are content to lay around on something soft and sleep.

The only useful dogs are smell dogs, hunting dogs, guard dogs, and herding dogs. If I want useless it better be lower maintenance.


Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2019, 01:05:23 pm »
I honestly have no idea. Most people see dogs as an accessory. I do see lots of elderly people with small dogs that they clearly love dearly, and are probably their main (if not only) companionship. Small rat dogs are kind of gross, but if they're making someone old person's life less miserable, then they're doing some good.

But yeah - nobody seems to get that you literally can't leave a dog alone at home without any companionship for 8-12 hours per day and expect it to be okay. And so many people do this. Our neighbours have a poor dog, and they leave it home all day, and it never stops barking.

And I think the people that have a dog just tied up in the sun / rain / snow / whatever weather outside on a super short line and it just stands there day in and day out feeling miserable are terrible people.

I wish people would realize that if you have a dog, you should raise it actively, responsibly, and caring, or just like... don't have a dog?

I'd say honestly like 90% of dog owners here shouldn't be dog owners.


  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1515

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2019, 01:06:52 pm »
Pampered pet ownership is a relatively recent phenomenon among the general masses. Before,  the middle class became a thing, in now what we call high income counties, was reserved for the rich, or people who needed them to do a job. Jobs like hunt for food, or guardsomething, carry things, pull things...

And in Korea this pet ownership is even more of a recent thing. Like a post-2000's thing. Before they were reserved for farmers to watch their crops, and livestock, and stuff...


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5111

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2019, 01:13:58 pm »
on a semi-related point, what's with those dog carriers you see? isn't the point of walking your dog to allow your dog to actually walk? maybe i'm missing something
I have 2 dachshunds.
     One is 6 years old and from a litter that was left at a Buddhist temple, the other is around 15-16. The latter was a rescue: I found her in a rubbish bin as somebody had literally thrown her away. Took about 4 or 5 months for the mange to disappear and for her to regain weight (she was skin and bones), and about 400,000 won to remove, drain, and stitch up her infected teeth, sores, and various abscesses etc.
  Aside from some food related issues, she's fine now. They both love going for walks (duh) but considering the latter wiener's age, she gets understandably tired during walks. As I get tired pretty quickly dragging her by the leash, I take my knapsack along and stick her in there when she can't walk any further (I get some pretty strange looks). Anyway, I suppose that would be what doggo carriers are for.

If I want useless it better be lower maintenance.
Exactly. Which is why I'm, always a bit flabbergasted when I see see folk trying to drive their Mustangs/Porches/BMWs/Ferraris through the Jungangno club district on a Friday night.  :rolleyes:


  • NorthStar
  • Super Waygook

    • 441

    • July 05, 2017, 10:54:06 am
    • Seoul
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2019, 01:15:48 pm »
Quote
And I think the people that have a dog just tied up in the sun / rain / snow / whatever weather outside on a super short line and it just stands there day in and day out feeling miserable are terrible people.

THAT.


Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2019, 01:21:57 pm »
This is a symptom of a broader phenomenon- The urban and suburbanized view of animals. Out in the country, people understand animals. In the city and suburbs? It's borderline fantasy land for most.


Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2019, 02:03:02 pm »
In short, dogs reflect their owner's personalities.  Personally, I can't stand the high maintenance, small, yappy dogs that are so prevalent here in the cities.  I get it, people live in apartments and don't have the space to have big dogs.  They also don't want to be covered in dog hair all day, every day.  That's fine.  But to have these little boney dogs that have to be carried around, lack any kind of training from their owners or just sit there shivering is not something I can relate to.  I don't see the point.  I do love all animals, but when I see these small-faced weasels, I find it hard to understand the 'ahhh, isn't it cute' comments.  Personally, no.  This is before we get onto how ethical it is to breed dogs that have trouble breathing anyway.  Give me a big dog any day.


Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2019, 02:06:21 pm »
And I think the people that have a dog just tied up in the sun / rain / snow / whatever weather outside on a super short line and it just stands there day in and day out feeling miserable are terrible people.
+1000

That shit is seriously messed up. I saw a kitten tethered to a trash heap with a tiny little string once.

Oh Korea...


  • Aristocrat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1693

    • November 10, 2014, 01:04:27 pm
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2019, 02:16:17 pm »
Back home, we had 2 rottweilers. They were disciplined, loyal, intelligent, fearless and protective. We owned a large property and dogs were necessary as there'd been a few attempted break-ins, particularly at night. These dogs were so on point, they'd actually take shifts guarding and patrolling the property at night; one would sleep during the first watch and the other dog would sleep during the 2nd watch. Those two bosses and my family had a symbiotic relationship, as it should be.

Still begs the question, why dogs for Koreans? Cats are far more practical and provide the same type of companionship. Why specifically dogs? Is there a lingering superstition regarding cats? Are dogs more of a status symbol? I don't get it.



  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 2068

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2019, 03:10:02 pm »
on a semi-related point, what's with those dog carriers you see? isn't the point of walking your dog to allow your dog to actually walk? maybe i'm missing something
I have 2 dachshunds.
     One is 6 years old and from a litter that was left at a Buddhist temple, the other is around 15-16. The latter was a rescue: I found her in a rubbish bin as somebody had literally thrown her away. Took about 4 or 5 months for the mange to disappear and for her to regain weight (she was skin and bones), and about 400,000 won to remove, drain, and stitch up her infected teeth, sores, and various abscesses etc.
  Aside from some food related issues, she's fine now. They both love going for walks (duh) but considering the latter wiener's age, she gets understandably tired during walks. As I get tired pretty quickly dragging her by the leash, I take my knapsack along and stick her in there when she can't walk any further (I get some pretty strange looks). Anyway, I suppose that would be what doggo carriers are for.

If I want useless it better be lower maintenance.
Exactly. Which is why I'm, always a bit flabbergasted when I see see folk trying to drive their Mustangs/Porches/BMWs/Ferraris through the Jungangno club district on a Friday night.  :rolleyes:
Makes sense. Maybe the little rat-looking dogs here can't walk very far, either. I suppose if you're in a busy area, you can't walk it really anyway. I've almost stood on people's dogs a few times because I didn't see it. Guess I helped answer my own question


Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2019, 03:13:58 pm »
Still begs the question, why dogs for Koreans? Cats are far more practical and provide the same type of companionship. Why specifically dogs? Is there a lingering superstition regarding cats? Are dogs more of a status symbol? I don't get it.

Some people just don't like cats. In Korea especially, while cats are popular animals, I've come across a surprisingly large number of folks, especially old Koreans, who see them as pest animals.

That, or they consider them too unpredictable.

Others are allergic, or live with family members who are, or just don't like the idea that cats will climb on shit and scratch things up, and shed all over their clothes while dogs have more non-shed options.

I personally prefer dogs because they're what I grew up with, but I also like cats and wouldn't have a problem caring for the right one. For sure, a cat would better fit my current schedule and lifestyle. But given that I don't want to work on cat-proofing my home (which is too tiny for any pet bigger than a hamster anyway, imo), and don't want to deal with cat hair getting on and into everything, I haven't made the commitment.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2019, 03:28:47 pm by Chinguetti »


  • Aristocrat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1693

    • November 10, 2014, 01:04:27 pm
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2019, 04:07:47 pm »
Still begs the question, why dogs for Koreans? Cats are far more practical and provide the same type of companionship. Why specifically dogs? Is there a lingering superstition regarding cats? Are dogs more of a status symbol? I don't get it.

Some people just don't like cats. In Korea especially, while cats are popular animals, I've come across a surprisingly large number of folks, especially old Koreans, who see them as pest animals.

That, or they consider them too unpredictable.

Others are allergic, or live with family members who are, or just don't like the idea that cats will climb on shit and scratch things up, and shed all over their clothes while dogs have more non-shed options.

I personally prefer dogs because they're what I grew up with, but I also like cats and wouldn't have a problem caring for the right one. For sure, a cat would better fit my current schedule and lifestyle. But given that I don't want to work on cat-proofing my home (which is too tiny for any pet bigger than a hamster anyway, imo), and don't want to deal with cat hair getting on and into everything, I haven't made the commitment.

I think it comes down to irrational superstition.

As many know, I'm a bit of a clothing snob. First thing I do when I get home is take off my nice clothes, put them in the wardrobe and put on my house clothes. Never had a problem with fur on my clothes.
A cat who scratches up everything hasn't been given something to scratch, they're pretty easy to train. Put a scratching post next to the couch and the cat will figure the rest out. Look after a cat properly
and it'll be the cleanest thing in your house and as long as you're not a dirty bastard (vacuum at least twice a week), the fur really isn't a problem.

Sure, keeping a cat has it's challenges, but dogs in the house!?

The first thing I'll know about someone who keeps dogs in their home is the smell. Big dog or small dog, people who keep dogs almost always smell like dog. If there home is carpeted, little bits of faecal matter on said carpet isn't uncommon. Anyways, I'm ranting. I guess it simply comes down to superstition and ignorance to own a dog, in Korea.


  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1515

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2019, 04:43:36 pm »
I think it comes down to irrational superstition.
From what I've been told, by a few old geezers, there is some folktale, or legend, about cats disturbing your grave. So, they think they're unlucky.


Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2019, 09:08:20 pm »
This is a symptom of a broader phenomenon- The urban and suburbanized view of animals. Out in the country, people understand animals. In the city and suburbs? It's borderline fantasy land for most.

This is it. Every Korean I've ever spoken about life back in Ireland thinks that hunting is "bad". They can never offer any explanation for this, nor do they ever change their minds about it. They are totally detached from nature. The difference between here and Ireland is that this applies to Koreans who grew up in rural environments, too. In Ireland it's only the coddled urban classes who hold such silly views.


  • CO2
  • The Legend

    • 4517

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
    more
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2019, 09:27:29 pm »
This is a symptom of a broader phenomenon- The urban and suburbanized view of animals. Out in the country, people understand animals. In the city and suburbs? It's borderline fantasy land for most.

This is it. Every Korean I've ever spoken about life back in Ireland thinks that hunting is "bad". They can never offer any explanation for this, nor do they ever change their minds about it. They are totally detached from nature. The difference between here and Ireland is that this applies to Koreans who grew up in rural environments, too. In Ireland it's only the coddled urban classes who hold such silly views.

There are fewer things more annoying than someone who thinks hunting is bad, but will gladly go to McDonald's on a Saturday night and crush 12 000W worth of food.

These people deserve the ultimate "Shut the F up."
The joys of fauxtherhood


  • JVPrice
  • Expert Waygook

    • 774

    • August 29, 2017, 10:26:13 am
    • Cheongju
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2019, 07:13:34 am »
And I think the people that have a dog just tied up in the sun / rain / snow / whatever weather outside on a super short line and it just stands there day in and day out feeling miserable are terrible people.
+1000

That shit is seriously messed up. I saw a kitten tethered to a trash heap with a tiny little string once.

Oh Korea...

Every other day, before I switched schools, I had to walk past the same dog who was tied up near the road. He was always laying in the same spot, whether it was cold, hot, raining. Even when the owners were there, he remained in that spot. I often had thoughts of setting him free.

There are people back home that do this too but... Why even own a dog at that point? They're more akin to a prisoner than a pet. It makes zero sense.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2019, 07:57:21 am by JVPrice »
The World Ends With You


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5045

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
    more
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2019, 07:49:36 am »
This is a symptom of a broader phenomenon- The urban and suburbanized view of animals. Out in the country, people understand animals. In the city and suburbs? It's borderline fantasy land for most.

This is it. Every Korean I've ever spoken about life back in Ireland thinks that hunting is "bad". They can never offer any explanation for this, nor do they ever change their minds about it. They are totally detached from nature. The difference between here and Ireland is that this applies to Koreans who grew up in rural environments, too. In Ireland it's only the coddled urban classes who hold such silly views.

There are fewer things more annoying than someone who thinks hunting is bad, but will gladly go to McDonald's on a Saturday night and crush 12 000W worth of food.

These people deserve the ultimate "Shut the F up."

There are fewer things more sick than rich entitled people who think its okay to pay some stooge in Africa to shoot an endangered wild life species in an enclosed area with a high-powered rifle with a telescopic lens where the animal has no chance and then have the gall to criticise people who are against hunting.

Hunting except for survival and culling to maintain the ecosystem should be banned.
Everything is not as it seems.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5111

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Why are dogs a thing here (pets, not food)?
« Reply #19 on: June 04, 2019, 07:57:51 am »
There are fewer things more sick than rich entitled people who think its okay to pay some stooge in Africa to shoot an endangered wild life species in an enclosed area with a high-powered rifle with a telescopic lens where the animal has no chance and then have the gall to criticise people who are against hunting.
Hunting except for survival and culling to maintain the ecosystem should be banned.
Hunting for food in your freezer in BC is pretty common, but of course, they've got problems with white-tail deer population booms over there, so I guess it's ecologically sustainable.
But don't get me started on grizzly, wolf, or mountain lion hunting: people use the dumbest arguments to justify it.  >:(
Also, I agree that trophy hunting in general is just f***ed up!