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Re: Koreans: Stop walking on the cycle lane!
« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2019, 03:00:29 pm »
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I'm pretty sure there's a lot more to the story. Korean news articles aren't the best about revealing and articulating important details.

Not challenging that what both people did was ridiculous, but I don't buy the story given by the husband.

What would involve both Korean style stuff AND be an alternative explanation....?

See my post above.
Oh but the husband and wife argument is so boring. We need something more to sexy it up. Maybe stir in a Age 50+ Sex Hiking Swingers Club or something.


  • gogators!
  • The Legend

    • 3648

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Koreans: Stop walking on the cycle lane!
« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2019, 07:33:28 am »
To be fair, I walk along the river near my home nearly every day. There's a huge cycle lane (one for each way) and the cyclists STILL go in the walking bit. Sometimes they come along in a group and rather than go single file they spread out across everything and expect the walkers to dart into the river bank it seems.

Works both ways.
A few Korean cyclists will use the walking path to avoid going up the hills. I rode regularly on those paths and never saw any groups "spreading out across everything,"  even on weekends.  I can't remember cyclists passing in the walking path either.

But that's not to say it doesn't happen. This is Korea, after all.


  • gogators!
  • The Legend

    • 3648

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Koreans: Stop walking on the cycle lane!
« Reply #22 on: May 16, 2019, 04:44:10 am »
Related to bike lane problems:

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Paris is clamping down on the exponential use of electric scooters by forcing operators to sign a charter of good practice or face a total ban.

The French capital is awash with free-floating “trottinettes électriques”, as Parisians call them, with a string of companies such as Lime, Bird and Uber flooding the streets with the speedy devices.

While they have revolutionised mobility for Parisians and tourists, they have become the bane of motorists and pedestrians. With almost 250,000 e-scooters sold in France last year - a 129 per cent increase compared with 2017 -  doctors also warn that they are facing a surge in accidents resulting from falls.

The problem has become acute in Paris where the rental fleet is estimated at 15,000 and growing fast. Users often fail to wear helmets despite many e-scooters reaching speeds of 37mph. One was even recently filmed at 53mph on a motorway near Paris.

A total of 284 people were injured and five killed in accidents involving scooters in 2017, the last year for which full figures are available. Élisabeth Borne, the French transport minister, said that their sudden arrival had been a “bit anarchic” and that they had brought “the law of the jungle” to French streets.

The government intends to outlaw riding an e-scooter on a pavement from September, with a fine of €135 for infringements. E-scooters will be authorised only in bicycle lanes and on minor roads, with a maximum authorised speed of 15mph and a fine of up to €1,500 for exceeding the limit.

Those scooter are getting pretty popular in SK too. I wonder if there will be any type of regulation.