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Grammar question: Verb + Verb vs. Verb + Noun
« on: April 22, 2019, 12:21:04 pm »
Hello~!

So to help structure their sentences, I'll usually go over verb usage beforehand because, even if they've learned the material already, a lot of students have a hard time remembering or applying what they've learned. The pattern they've gotten used to seeing is verb+noun. Normally, they only see a verb following another verb in my class if it's a helping or linking verb.

But when using the verb "go" I know that it's common for another active verb to follow it without it being a gerund. A good example would be "Let's go play basketball in the park."

Can anyone explain the reason for this? I can only really think of this being done with the verb "go," so is it just an exception due to how English has evolved to be used? Or is there some other explanation or rule for it?

TIA!


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5807

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Grammar question: Verb + Verb vs. Verb + Noun
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2019, 01:48:00 pm »
First off, it's an Americanism: you don't hear it very often outside North America, and many other native English speakers would consider it to be grammatically incorrect.


The construction is a two part sentence with the 'and' ellipsed.
Let's go and eat lunch    -->    Let's go eat lunch

   British English                         American English


Re: Grammar question: Verb + Verb vs. Verb + Noun
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2019, 02:19:48 pm »
Okay, that makes sense. I kind of thought it was grammatically incorrect, but I found a few websites that went over this type of use without actually going over the why of it, so I thought maybe it was an exception instead.

Thank you ~!


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1695

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Grammar question: Verb + Verb vs. Verb + Noun
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2019, 02:31:05 pm »
First off, it's an Americanism: you don't hear it very often outside North America, and many other native English speakers would consider it to be grammatically incorrect.


The construction is a two part sentence with the 'and' ellipsed.
Let's go and eat lunch    -->    Let's go eat lunch

   British English                         American English

I think "Let's go eat lunch" is used in NZ too, which follows British English.


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5807

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Grammar question: Verb + Verb vs. Verb + Noun
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2019, 02:34:45 pm »
I think "Let's go eat lunch" is used in NZ too, which follows British English.
But the British don't leave out the "and"...

Also, I thought you Kiwis called it "elevenses"?  :wink:


Re: Grammar question: Verb + Verb vs. Verb + Noun
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2019, 02:45:46 pm »
As well, it's informal; even in American English. You'll find plenty of people saying it, even if it really doesn't use "correct grammar".


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1695

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Grammar question: Verb + Verb vs. Verb + Noun
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2019, 07:40:42 am »
I think "Let's go eat lunch" is used in NZ too, which follows British English.
But the British don't leave out the "and"...

Also, I thought you Kiwis called it "elevenses"?  :wink:

Haha. I used to say elevenses when I was younger :P
I meant, we say that in NZ, but NZ follows British English. However, it's super informal, and would be considered a mistake in a test, due to the missing and :p