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  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2489

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #60 on: April 14, 2021, 04:19:48 pm »
Seoul is at the same latitude as Northern Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona as well as southern Nevada.


Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #61 on: April 14, 2021, 05:03:08 pm »
Seoul is at the same latitude as Northern Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona as well as southern Nevada.

Richmond, VA and Springfield, MO and San Francisco, CA


  • T.J.
  • Super Waygook

    • 263

    • June 09, 2011, 11:07:16 am
    • 서울 은평구 연신내
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #62 on: April 14, 2021, 06:21:54 pm »
Richmond, VA and Springfield, MO and San Francisco, CA
Richmond, VA and Springfield, MO and San Francisco, CA

I always thought it interesting that Seoul and Richmond are at about the same latitude as are Pyeongyang and Washington D.C. Both capital cities during civil wars lying at the same latitudes and roughly the same distance from one another.
"An ignorant person is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."

"Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock."

-Will Rogers


  • leaponover
  • Expert Waygook

    • 770

    • March 05, 2012, 12:08:16 pm
    • Iksan, S. Korea
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #63 on: April 21, 2021, 08:24:34 pm »
Richmond, VA and Springfield, MO and San Francisco, CA

And the weather matches these places more than it does the previous mentioned places.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3637

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #64 on: April 22, 2021, 10:40:32 am »
What's a typical day like for Hangook77? Give me a rundown. What time do you wake up? Meal times? What do you do for leisure in the evenings after work? What time do you go to bed?

Didn't know y'all cared so much about my life.  I hit the snooze button once or twice, I roll out of bed at 7:45ish, eat some muesli, grab my coffee, and drive to school.  Get home 5ish.  I drink a shake, take a bike ride, come home and cook (sometimes), take a shower, do some light chores, get clothing and all that stuff ready for the next day.  In between, read and search stuff online.  Some chatting, too.  Go to bed, watch some youtube documentaries (bad habit, I know).  I try to get to sleep by 12 and ocasionally 1ish (too late also, I know).  Weekends, meet folks, ride bike, chores, shopping, hike, date, etc.

Deskwarming time, prep for classes, read (lately more investing type books, etc), study about crypto, chat on here a bit, etc.  (Wash my bedding weekly on weekends. etc.) 


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2282

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #65 on: April 22, 2021, 10:50:21 am »
Sounds like a sensible lifestyle.
I envy you it.   :sad:


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3637

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #66 on: April 22, 2021, 11:33:44 am »
Sounds like a sensible lifestyle.
I envy you it.   :sad:

Thanks.  I am only on here briefly during down deskwarming time.  Though sometimes, I just plain get lazy and lounge around some evenings and some weekends too.  Ha ha.

Bought a decent GIANT a couple of years ago for MTB riding (which means mostly road biking in Korea).


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3637

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #67 on: April 22, 2021, 11:53:17 am »
Sounds like a sensible lifestyle.
I envy you it.   :sad:

What do you?


  • 745sticky
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1447

    • March 26, 2020, 01:52:57 pm
    • Korea
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #68 on: April 22, 2021, 12:35:10 pm »
Didn't know y'all cared so much about my life.  I hit the snooze button once or twice, I roll out of bed at 7:45ish...
 I try to get to sleep by 12 and ocasionally 1ish (too late also, I know)

I'm guilty of this too tbh


Bought a decent GIANT a couple of years ago for MTB riding (which means mostly road biking in Korea).

must be nice, i settled for a shitty folding one due to space/storage reasons


  • D.L.Orean
  • Super Waygook

    • 443

    • February 25, 2020, 09:34:41 am
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #69 on: April 22, 2021, 12:40:19 pm »
Thanks.  I am only on here briefly during down deskwarming time.  Though sometimes, I just plain get lazy and lounge around some evenings and some weekends too.  Ha ha.

Bought a decent GIANT a couple of years ago for MTB riding (which means mostly road biking in Korea).

How do you handle storage and basic maintenance/cleaning? Had a road bike before coming to Korea and always had outdoor space for cleaning, etc.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2282

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #70 on: April 22, 2021, 12:59:46 pm »
What do you do?
We have a 20 month old who has more or less devoured any and all free time that we might otherwise use in the pursuit of hobbies.

While I am definitely not a morning person, I now wake up at 5 so that I can get my daily run in, prep the kid, and have enough time to commute.
From 5pm to 8 we have a pretty set routine (young kids need really well defined routines in order to settle their sleep schedules), and by the time the little gremlin is out, we're too tired to do much in the way of hobbies. We usually watch an episode of a Netflix series ( r/s/p to see which of us will choose the series), then it's lights out before 10, most week nights.

Weekends are a bit more interesting. We're both active in (different) sports leagues, and we both cycle whenever possible (got a little trailer contraption for the kiddo. We go to rivers, lakes and the ocean at least once or twice a month, and go on hikes on the weekends when we don't end up at a beach (kiddo has a backpack thingy he rides in). Usually we drag along a friend or 2.

I used to do a lot of gaming and 3D modelling, TKD, rock climbing, and mountain cycling here in Korea (we're lucky enough to live nearby some stellar mountains that cater to the latter 2), but that's all kinda been put on hold until we have more time for ourselves again.

How do you handle storage and basic maintenance/cleaning? Had a road bike before coming to Korea and always had outdoor space for cleaning, etc.
I store mine in the underground parking area, locked up in front of the cctv cameras. I had my bike stripped down to the frame my second year here in Korea, despite that it was chained to the railing in the entrance way of my villa.  :sad:
Maintenance and cleaning I do in the park area just outside my building. I'm gonna bring it to a car wash tomorrow for a quick power wash, I think, on my ride back from work.
It's a Norco mtb (Bushpilot), so it's pretty tough: haven't had any major mechanical issues with it since replacing... well... most of it... after having had it stripped.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3637

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #71 on: April 23, 2021, 09:12:18 am »
We have a 20 month old who has more or less devoured any and all free time that we might otherwise use in the pursuit of hobbies.

While I am definitely not a morning person, I now wake up at 5 so that I can get my daily run in, prep the kid, and have enough time to commute.
From 5pm to 8 we have a pretty set routine (young kids need really well defined routines in order to settle their sleep schedules), and by the time the little gremlin is out, we're too tired to do much in the way of hobbies. We usually watch an episode of a Netflix series ( r/s/p to see which of us will choose the series), then it's lights out before 10, most week nights.

Weekends are a bit more interesting. We're both active in (different) sports leagues, and we both cycle whenever possible (got a little trailer contraption for the kiddo. We go to rivers, lakes and the ocean at least once or twice a month, and go on hikes on the weekends when we don't end up at a beach (kiddo has a backpack thingy he rides in). Usually we drag along a friend or 2.

I used to do a lot of gaming and 3D modelling, TKD, rock climbing, and mountain cycling here in Korea (we're lucky enough to live nearby some stellar mountains that cater to the latter 2), but that's all kinda been put on hold until we have more time for ourselves again.


Sweet.  Seems like Korea has worked really well for you.  If ever I go down the kid route, I'd better get a good home gym to exercise while watching the kids.  Need an extra fitness room. I suppose the kids have to grow up more and get some mobility before hiking the mountains again.   Just out of curiosity, not really related, is it easy for foreigners (married to Koreans) to get home loans nowadays?  If I married here, maybe I'd move to a small town to get cheaper housing, buy an old house and fix up.  Can do public school anywhere even rural areas or just move onto other things with the F visa.  Of course not sure if I will leave too. 



  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2282

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #72 on: April 23, 2021, 11:07:44 am »
You don't even need to be married to a Korean to qualify for a home loan. Just need to have 10% of the home value cash to pay up front, and a verifiable, guaranteed income sufficient to pay off the mortgage.

We got a 40% mortgage without any hassles, and probably could've got more if we had pushed for it... although I think that the rules may have recently changed, pushing the max down to 40% of home value (or 20% if you're rich and are buying a home worth more than 1.2 billion won).

And there are backpacks designed for carrying young 'uns that are pretty sweet for hiking!


  • Lazio
  • Expert Waygook

    • 607

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #73 on: April 23, 2021, 11:39:42 am »
You don't even need to be married to a Korean to qualify for a home loan. Just need to have 10% of the home value cash to pay up front, and a verifiable, guaranteed income sufficient to pay off the mortgage.

We got a 40% mortgage without any hassles, and probably could've got more if we had pushed for it... although I think that the rules may have recently changed, pushing the max down to 40% of home value (or 20% if you're rich and are buying a home worth more than 1.2 billion won).

And there are backpacks designed for carrying young 'uns that are pretty sweet for hiking!

I believe currently 30% down payment needed at least. And that is out in the sticks. Most urban areas have been designated as "speculative zones" or "overheated speculative zones" (or whatever it would translate to)
In those areas the minimum down payment is 50% and 60% respectively.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2282

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #74 on: April 23, 2021, 01:07:26 pm »
I believe currently 30% down payment needed at least. And that is out in the sticks. Most urban areas have been designated as "speculative zones" or "overheated speculative zones" (or whatever it would translate to)
In those areas the minimum down payment is 50% and 60% respectively.
We needed to show the 10% as the deposit in order to get the ball rolling on the rest of the  purchase. Like a holding fee, I meant. Basically, if we changed our minds, we would have been out that amount.

We scraped up the remainder later, but I guess you're right that it would be considered as part of the down payment, as it wasn't financed or anything.

I'm wondering though, if loans can only be up to 50%, how can the down payment be only 30%? Doesn't that leave 20% unaccounted for? Or is it possible to get other kinds of loans to make up that difference?




  • Lazio
  • Expert Waygook

    • 607

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #75 on: April 23, 2021, 01:20:58 pm »
We needed to show the 10% as the deposit in order to get the ball rolling on the rest of the  purchase. Like a holding fee, I meant. Basically, if we changed our minds, we would have been out that amount.

We scraped up the remainder later, but I guess you're right that it would be considered as part of the down payment, as it wasn't financed or anything.

I'm wondering though, if loans can only be up to 50%, how can the down payment be only 30%? Doesn't that leave 20% unaccounted for? Or is it possible to get other kinds of loans to make up that difference?


30% down payment is for the non-speculative areas.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2282

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #76 on: April 23, 2021, 01:44:26 pm »
You're an awesome reals-estate resource.
Thanks for always correcting mistakes and answering questions!


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3637

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #77 on: April 23, 2021, 05:18:25 pm »
I'm guilty of this too tbh


must be nice, i settled for a shitty folding one due to space/storage reasons


Older renovated smaller apartments out in the provinces can be had for a deal or a 3 room villa.  Keep the bike in the spare room.  But too much junk though.  10 to 20 mil deposit.  I realize that gets a small place in Seoul.  I lived in a one room for years so I feel your pain. 


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3637

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #78 on: April 23, 2021, 05:20:54 pm »
How do you handle storage and basic maintenance/cleaning? Had a road bike before coming to Korea and always had outdoor space for cleaning, etc.


I rent a small two bedroom apartment.  I clean outside in the parking lot.  I keep the bike in the small bedroom.  In my old one room, I locked the bike to window bars outside in the underparking area with a metal lock.  Though most friend's villas didnt have this feature. 


  • Lazio
  • Expert Waygook

    • 607

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: Spring in Korea!
« Reply #79 on: April 23, 2021, 11:03:07 pm »
You're an awesome reals-estate resource.
Thanks for always correcting mistakes and answering questions!

I just googled navered it really. Can't remember all these percentages.

Btw, if someone qualifies for those government assisted special mortgages, then the LTV can go higher. Up to 70% even in the "overheated speculative areas" But 70% is the most in non-speculative areas as well. So at least 30% down payment is needed, no matter what.
Income-wise: We got two different mortgage loans in the past with zero income (zero on papers anyways) It was based on our credit card spendings and our monthly health insurance premiums.
It was actually good not to have income because that way, we qualified for one of these "poor people's" loans with lower rates. But that was before all these recent regulations. So perhaps it wouldn't work that way now.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2021, 08:48:51 am by Lazio »