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  • SanderB
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World's happiest countries
« on: March 20, 2019, 11:56:54 pm »
World's happiest countries 2019

1. Finland
2. Denmark
3. Norway
4. Iceland
5. Netherlands

All the top countries tend to have high values for all six of the key variables that have been found to support well-being:

income, healthy life expectancy, social support, freedom, trust and generosity:wink:  Side burn at the froggies out there.

The US ranked 61st on Freedom.

https://yle.fi/uutiset/osasto/news/finland_still_the_happiest_country_in_the_world_says_un_report/10698146
« Last Edit: March 21, 2019, 02:24:06 am by SanderB »
Fiat voluntas tua- What you want is allowed


  • VanIslander
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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2019, 01:18:35 am »
If you like snowy and cold weather.

The Inuit love their igloos, just as the Bushmen love Botswana, but that doesn't mean people not of the place would be happiest there.

I'd be pretty miserable living in Scandinavia or the Swiss Alps or Iceland. Ugh.
(I might find the Mediterranean coastal countries like Italy to be a slice of heaven.)
« Last Edit: March 21, 2019, 01:27:17 am by VanIslander »


  • JNM
  • The Legend

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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2019, 01:58:46 am »
If you like snowy and cold weather.

The Inuit love their igloos, just as the Bushmen love Botswana, but that doesn't mean people not of the place would be happiest there.

I'd be pretty miserable living in Scandinavia or the Swiss Alps or Iceland. Ugh.
(I might find the Mediterranean coastal countries like Italy to be a slice of heaven.)

Iím the exact opposite.

Over 25C, my brain shuts down and I cannot function.


  • VanIslander
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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2019, 03:30:39 am »
If you like snowy and cold weather.

The Inuit love their igloos, just as the Bushmen love Botswana, but that doesn't mean people not of the place would be happiest there.

I'd be pretty miserable living in Scandinavia or the Swiss Alps or Iceland. Ugh.
(I might find the Mediterranean coastal countries like Italy to be a slice of heaven.)
Iím the exact opposite.

Over 25C, my brain shuts down and I cannot function.
Not exact opposite, as I included extreme heat (Botswana) with the example of extreme cold (Inuit) and defined my ideal as moderate conditions (coastal Mediterranean).

The Mediterranean climate doesn't have a huge swing in temperatures, being neither very cold nor very hot. It scientifically includes San Francisco up to the temperate rainforest of Seattle, and Southern Chile, as well as the vinyard and olive growing areas of the Mediterranean.

Under 0 C my body shuts down other than to shudder and go foetal.
Over 30 C my brain too goes full lawnchair and ice tea mode.

But Iceland's warmest summer temperature averages 14 C !!!!

Oslo, the southernmost city in Norway averages 6 hours of sunshine in winter, overcast and minus temperatures and wind for months.

The happiest countries in the world doesn't mean if people MOVED there they would be happy. Kids grow up skiing, snowshoeing, wearing parkas for nearly half the year and loving it.

I am from Canada and have found winters miserable in Winnipeg and Toronto (lived there for a couple of years), in Windsor awful in summer (30+ c with heavy metal smelling air pollution trapped near ground level by seasonal high pressure systems)... Vancouver Island I LOVED living on, but it is a mild climate, with temps between 5 c in winter and 22 c in summer. Ideally the summers would be a few degrees warmer and the winters less rainy.

But the EXTREME climate of Scandinavians might not affect the happiness of the natives.

I was replying to the implicit claim of such lists that those countries would be great places for us (non-natives) to live.


« Last Edit: March 21, 2019, 03:37:42 am by VanIslander »


  • SanderB
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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2019, 03:41:48 am »
You could deduce that viking cultures with their egalitarian and cooperative cultures make people happier.
Fiat voluntas tua- What you want is allowed


Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2019, 07:05:25 am »
due to global warming, Scandinavian winters in the southern cities like Oslo, Stockholm and Helsinki are no where near as harsh or as long as before.  less sunlight, yes, but not as freezing.  I was in Stockholm about twelve years ago for a holiday and it was -37, you don't really see those temperatures anymore.


  • Kayos
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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2019, 07:48:55 am »
If you like snowy and cold weather.

The Inuit love their igloos, just as the Bushmen love Botswana, but that doesn't mean people not of the place would be happiest there.

I'd be pretty miserable living in Scandinavia or the Swiss Alps or Iceland. Ugh.
(I might find the Mediterranean coastal countries like Italy to be a slice of heaven.)

Iím the exact opposite.

Over 25C, my brain shuts down and I cannot function.

Me too. Don't summer here this year, Summer (the season), you B!@#$%^d!


Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2019, 08:38:16 am »
Happiness is subjective. As is the cultural expectation to say you are happy.

Lastly, is happiness everything? I say no. People need to moderate themselves on the pursuit of happiness. "Happiness is the most important thing and I should always be happy" is how a child thinks.


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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2019, 08:45:12 am »
Happiness is subjective. As is the cultural expectation to say you are happy.

Lastly, is happiness everything? I say no. People need to moderate themselves on the pursuit of happiness. "Happiness is the most important thing and I should always be happy" is how a child thinks.

Right? It's like not doing it for a while, and then you do it and you're like, "Yeaaahhhhhhhhhhhhh"
The joys of fauxtherhood


  • zola
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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2019, 08:57:22 am »
It's almost always northern European countries along with Canada, Australia and NZ.

What do they all have in common? They all have or used to have a relatively robust welfare system that provided security for those in difficult situations (Sickness, unemployment) as well as civil protections against exploitation (rights for workers, females, minorities). At the same time creating, at least a sense of, egalitarianism as mentioned by SanderB. You could also add to that, populations capped at 30-40 million.

We can pick holes in this of course. Australia is pretty racist and after what happened in NZ last week, we aren't looking great either also the welfare state has taken a battering in many places. But where they say "happiness" it's probably more "contentment". The knowledge that if the worst is to happen you aren't completely fucked, as you would be in other countries. Knowing that can take away a lot of stress from your daily life. So many Americans I talk to say the number one reason they stay i Korea is the health insurance system. Imagine living in a society where you are possibly one illness/accident away from destitution.
Kpip! - Martin 2018


Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2019, 09:04:58 am »
happiness is fleeting, life satisfaction is what people are after.  if people are always aiming for something they can't achieve or are always comparing themselves to others they will not be satisfied with their life.  there will be moments of happiness, but when society is always pushing a false superficial image of what it is to succeed, then it's going to create people who will not be satisfied with their lives because of this false image.  scandinavian countries and the like do well at trying to not create this life's winners/losers dichotomy.  if you meet a taxi driver or a toilet cleaner, they are considered the same as a teacher or company director.  would that ever be possible in Korea or other similar countries?  of course not. 


  • debbiem89
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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2019, 09:09:44 am »
Iceland is gorgeous and you can feel the positive energy from the people there.

Maybe I saw it with rose tinted specs being on holiday and all, but it seemed like everyone was genuinely nice.

The Netherlands I absolutely love as well. Again, the people just seem so chill and cool. I've been in summer and winter and the weather and surroundings were both beautiful in (obviously) very different ways. I'd live there given the chance.


Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2019, 09:13:00 am »
It's almost always northern European countries along with Canada, Australia and NZ.
It would be interesting to see how countries would fair in happiness surveys designed by people from other countries.

Would they still be at the top? Maybe.

Quote
  if you meet a taxi driver or a toilet cleaner, they are considered the same as a teacher or company director.
Yeah, I'm sure hot Swedish chicks are lining up to marry taxi drivers.  :rolleyes:

There's good things to learn from Scandinavia, but for goodness sakes those are people too. They aren't magic beings. They can be as selfish and petty as any other humans. Same with the Japanese or the Thais. People always think they're nice because they smile and in the case of the Thais, can be laid back, or the Japanese are super polite. But these people aren't magic. There's a bunch of scumbags in those countries too.


  • debbiem89
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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2019, 09:17:35 am »

There's good things to learn from Scandinavia, but for goodness sakes those are people too. They aren't magic beings. They can be as selfish and petty as any other humans. Same with the Japanese or the Thais. People always think they're nice because they smile and in the case of the Thais, can be laid back, or the Japanese are super polite. But these people aren't magic. There's a bunch of scumbags in those countries too.

I mean obviously...but you can get a feel of the general attitude of a country by just walking around a lot and interacting with people. It's pretty rare I meet someone polite and easy going (towards strangers) on the streets of Korea. Obviously they are out there but the fact it's rare in the day to day is very telling.


Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2019, 09:27:47 am »
Quote
  if you meet a taxi driver or a toilet cleaner, they are considered the same as a teacher or company director.
Yeah, I'm sure hot Swedish chicks are lining up to marry taxi drivers.  :rolleyes:

There's good things to learn from Scandinavia, but for goodness sakes those are people too. They aren't magic beings. They can be as selfish and petty as any other humans. Same with the Japanese or the Thais. People always think they're nice because they smile and in the case of the Thais, can be laid back, or the Japanese are super polite. But these people aren't magic. There's a bunch of scumbags in those countries too.

 :rolleyes:

cherry-picking again demartian.

as we are all aware of your rather blinkered world view, you'll know that 'hot Swedish chicks' is a stereotype you've picked up from somewhere, maybe the internet probably.  the mistake you make again and again is you don't read what people write.  i wrote something slightly disparaging about Korean society and your keyboard rage went into overtime.  there is a social hierarchy in Korea.  it affects how people view each other.  'how old are you?' 'are you married?' 'what is your job?'  why are these usually the first questions that a Korean will say to you?  why aren't these the first questions asked when you go to Stockholm or Oslo?  because they are not trying to place you in the hierarchy.  'ah, I'm older than you, good!'  'you're a doctor, oh!  these kind of superficial things are immaterial to people from other countries, not you, mind.  for you, it's always about being better than someone else.  like I wrote in my original post, when you're aiming to always aspire to things you can't have, or compare yourself to others, you'll never be satisfied, you'll have moments of fleeting happiness, but not satisfaction.



Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2019, 09:30:15 am »
It's pretty rare I meet someone polite and easy going (towards strangers) on the streets of Korea. Obviously they are out there but the fact it's rare in the day to day is very telling.
And yet if you look at the history of the Korean people, they have no history of wars of expansion and conquest. In fact they deliberately chose to be withdrawn. I'd consider that just as telling. The Dutch meanwhile were very "friendly" to strangers in the East and West Indies. Many people would consider Geert Wilders and the PVV not very friendly to strangers.

Also, treatment might vary significantly based on one's skin color as well as one's familiarity with the local language. I'd agree that the Dutch can be more gregarious. However in many cultures, gregariousness and overfamiliarity is interpreted as rudeness and the polite, hospitable, and courteous thing is to be more distant.

Even in our own cultures- American Southerners are expressive and emotional at introductions, which Midwesterners feel is overly friendly and makes them feel uncomfortable. Meanwhile Southerners see Midwesterners as "cold" and "distant". In some parts of America you should always stop and talk to people you see on the street. In others, you'd be considered a creeper.


Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2019, 09:33:46 am »
these kind of superficial things are immaterial to people from other countries, not you, mind.  for you, it's always about being better than someone else.
Sure they are. Go ahead and tell yourself that.

A lot of times these very same things are suggested at, either through visual cues (such as dress) or indirect cues, such as shopping and brand preferences, interests, etc.

You don't think Sweden has hipsters who are constantly judging you based on your taste in music? That's just as dumb as judging someone based on profession. You don't think there are people who check how many followers you have on instagram in Sweden?

Get real.


  • debbiem89
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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #17 on: March 21, 2019, 09:44:49 am »
It's pretty rare I meet someone polite and easy going (towards strangers) on the streets of Korea. Obviously they are out there but the fact it's rare in the day to day is very telling.
And yet if you look at the history of the Korean people, they have no history of wars of expansion and conquest. In fact they deliberately chose to be withdrawn. I'd consider that just as telling. The Dutch meanwhile were very "friendly" to strangers in the East and West Indies. Many people would consider Geert Wilders and the PVV not very friendly to strangers.

Also, treatment might vary significantly based on one's skin color as well as one's familiarity with the local language. I'd agree that the Dutch can be more gregarious. However in many cultures, gregariousness and overfamiliarity is interpreted as rudeness and the polite, hospitable, and courteous thing is to be more distant.

Even in our own cultures- American Southerners are expressive and emotional at introductions, which Midwesterners feel is overly friendly and makes them feel uncomfortable. Meanwhile Southerners see Midwesterners as "cold" and "distant". In some parts of America you should always stop and talk to people you see on the street. In others, you'd be considered a creeper.

Can ANYONE have a discussion on this board without an irrelevant history lecture? The examples you've given are tiresome and irrelevant to the discussion at hand.

I don't understand why you simply cannot take any critique of Korea? It's very odd.

Yes, customs and what it means to be "polite" and "friendly" may vary internationally, but you cannot deny the bad attitudes of Koreans towards other people.

I've highlighted the bit above because you mention that attitudes depend on skin colour? and familiarity with the local language? I mean that's not the case in a lot of these countries. I've been to The Netherlands many times and not one person has got arsy with me for 1. Not being able to speak Dutch 2. Talking to my own friends in my own language in public (both happened in Korea, even though my Korean is passable). I'd wager that people of different skin colours get treated way worse here than The Netherlands to.




  • debbiem89
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Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #18 on: March 21, 2019, 09:47:49 am »
these kind of superficial things are immaterial to people from other countries, not you, mind.  for you, it's always about being better than someone else.
Sure they are. Go ahead and tell yourself that.

A lot of times these very same things are suggested at, either through visual cues (such as dress) or indirect cues, such as shopping and brand preferences, interests, etc.

You don't think Sweden has hipsters who are constantly judging you based on your taste in music? That's just as dumb as judging someone based on profession. You don't think there are people who check how many followers you have on instagram in Sweden?


Get real.

Again you are missing the point being made.

NOONE is saying these people don't exist, but unlike in Korea the whole of friggin society isn't based around it. People aren't in general downright horrible to you because you happen to be a year younger. It's NOT accepted as the norm to treat people like that in other countries.


Re: World's happiest countries
« Reply #19 on: March 21, 2019, 10:20:59 am »
People aren't in general downright horrible to you because you happen to be a year younger. It's NOT accepted as the norm to treat people like that in other countries.
People here aren't downright horrible to people a year younger either.

Also, you do realize that culturally, Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic people and countries are NOT the norm, right?

The norm is the 1.4 billion people in China, 1.3 billion people in India, the 1.8 billion people in the Muslim world, and the 1 billion people in Sub-Saharan Africa.