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Discipline Woes and Boring Curriculums - What can I do?
« on: March 18, 2019, 02:23:37 pm »
So I've recently started at a new hagwon in Nowon and I'm already having a bit of trouble. I taught at a hagwon last year called Little Fox, which has a beautiful, premade curriculum where you teach everything from reading, to listening, to writing, to grammar. Everything is preset for you all I had to do was make games for students in between tasks to keep them motivated and active, which worked very well.

Now that I am at a new hagwon, I am solely to speaking teacher. I am to show short 1-5 minute clips from movies and the students are supposed to speak the dialogue with the same emotions of the characters. However, for higher classes with middle schoolers where the dialogues are extremely long (2 pages worth single spaced, in about 13 point font) they have a hard time staying focused and speaking with emotion (they use zombie voices). Or they straight up give up and not speak, study for their next class with the Korean teacher or just whisper to each other in Korean.

My elementary classes also barely speaks any English and I am not sure how to control this since they are in my class to speak English. I start off the class with basic how are you and what did you do on the weekend or what happened to you that was exciting today, etc., but it's like pulling teeth to get them to speak in English. They yell and hit and sometimes curse at each other in Korean while I'm talking to them.

I have 24 classes and I only see each of them once a week so using my own money to buy snacks and things as rewards is kind of out of the question. I did this for my other hagwon when I only had 60 students which was fine, but now I have way more and I don't feel it should be my responsibility to come out of my pocket to try to give them some insentive to behave when they behave perfectly for the Korean teachers and they give them no kind of reward. Also I can't take away break time for all of my classes as a punishment because some of them I teach as their last class.

I'm sorry this is all over the place, but I just wanted some advise on how to get the students to try to speak English and also not to talk over me and other students in Korean. I would like to do some kind of group class reward systems but I don't think I'll be able to give any physical rewards. I guess the only thing I can do is take away games, but for the middle schoolers they don't really care about games so I don't think it'll work.

I've read other posts on discipline which were helpful but they all have some kind of prize reward or candy at the end.

I also can't seem to get over that fact that I don't think they can really learn anything by speaking these dialogues, because many of them don't even understand what's happening in them, especially the middle schoolers. My boss had them watching and speaking Ted Talk videos, which they understood maybe about 10% of what was happening and so I decided to change it to a movie which I'm hoping they will enjoy more and be able to understand. I feel as if I am not contributing anything to them and they won't learn anything from my classes based on this curriculum. So if you have some tips on how to get over the fact that I can't be the awesome teacher that can actually teach them English as I did at my old hagwon that would be helpful too.

Thanks!


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1195

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Discipline Woes and Boring Curriculums - What can I do?
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2019, 03:52:56 pm »
For a boring curriculum, I'm not sure.
My schools want me to make lessons in a very specific way. Which is boring for me and the students.
But, it's a way that is useful to the students at least.

As for discipline, I'm not sure. I usually leave it to the kor-teachers, I always got yelled at when trying to do it myself.
But, you could always get a big cheap bag of candy, and reward just a handful of students every now and then (just be consistent with the timings and stuff) :p


  • SanderB
  • Super Waygook

    • 312

    • June 02, 2018, 06:25:54 pm
Re: Discipline Woes and Boring Curriculums - What can I do?
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2019, 07:07:48 am »
Quote
they won't learn anything from my classes
Much research has been done on this and you are actually doing the best thing you could do. Don't or at least try to minimise any grammar teaching. With the scripts you have, think of different ways how you could have them act them out or introduce theater plays.

It is hard to let go of the way most teachers are trained in at college, but emergentist teaching is the most effective for L2 acquisition.. A 2005 study among middle schools showed again that Grammar instruction is ineffective. A 1970s study of 250 students for over 2 years showed no differences in test scores between grammar or non-grammatical instruction classes.

Watch this vid, even though I disagree with Krashen's last claim, it makes teaching communicatively clearer and it shows exactly where Korean English education fails at or is hopelessly old-fashioned in.

Tip: don't ask for tips on class management for you might summon the resident Troll Marty. :P Just be your kind, warm loving self. I used to work there. Nowon-gu?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_EQDtpYSNM

You could have this site translate their scripts for them and it also makes flashcards for them.
I use it for my expats class.

https://readlang.com/en/library



« Last Edit: March 19, 2019, 07:47:27 am by SanderB »
green everything


Re: Discipline Woes and Boring Curriculums - What can I do?
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2019, 08:05:18 am »
For a boring curriculum, I'm not sure.
My schools want me to make lessons in a very specific way. Which is boring for me and the students.
But, it's a way that is useful to the students at least.

As for discipline, I'm not sure. I usually leave it to the kor-teachers, I always got yelled at when trying to do it myself.
But, you could always get a big cheap bag of candy, and reward just a handful of students every now and then (just be consistent with the timings and stuff) :p

Thanks for the info :D If all else fails I'll try to use candy.


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1195

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Discipline Woes and Boring Curriculums - What can I do?
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2019, 08:51:44 am »
For a boring curriculum, I'm not sure.
My schools want me to make lessons in a very specific way. Which is boring for me and the students.
But, it's a way that is useful to the students at least.

As for discipline, I'm not sure. I usually leave it to the kor-teachers, I always got yelled at when trying to do it myself.
But, you could always get a big cheap bag of candy, and reward just a handful of students every now and then (just be consistent with the timings and stuff) :p

Thanks for the info :D If all else fails I'll try to use candy.

You mentioned thinking of a points / rewards system, you could do that, put students into groups, and the best group after X amount of days / weeks get a prize (like a piece of candy or something) it'll help keep the cost down for you, but still giving them something to work towards.

And yeah, my schools, the kor-teachers were in charge of discipline and hated when I would try to do it myself (even when they wouldn't do it). So, can't help ya here, sorry. :(


Re: Discipline Woes and Boring Curriculums - What can I do?
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2019, 09:13:40 am »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_EQDtpYSNM

You could have this site translate their scripts for them and it also makes flashcards for them.
I use it for my expats class.

https://readlang.com/en/library



ok im sorry but just a fyi, that translation is slightly incorrect b/c it directly translated "back" and "fourth" into "4th" and the literal word of "back"....lol  so i guess i'd be careful with that. :shocked: :rolleyes: :sad:

Student motivation and discipline is always an ongoing topic with no seemingly one definite solution.
you could always do what someone else suggested and do a point system where they reach a certain amt, maybe they can get some candy. OR you can make a friendly class competition and at the end of a midterm or test, the best class can get a small pizza or ddeokboekki party (buy/find the cheap pizza, not that fancy pizza lol).
The "best" class being one who participates well, tries their best, listens, etc.

and honestly since you're their new teacher they just testing boundaries and whatnot so not that you have to be their best friend but just getting to know the students names can help. youre already searching for better content to teach so that's definitely a great start as well.

good luck~