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  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1162

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
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Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2019, 10:42:15 am »
It's OK to express your opinions as long as they are left wing opinions.  The sad truth is free speech is dead unless you're a far left crazy.  Marxist ideologies spread by teachers to the kids are quite common and by design.  Even speaking the views outside the classroom if they aren't far left will get you into trouble.  In Korea, no one cares.  I say shit on Facebook all the time.  A couple of teachers teaching back home in Canada messaged me in private agreeing with me and saying they admire my ability to speak.  They self censor due to their profession, even online.  Shows, the incredible unfair bias teachers are subjected to.  Thought and speech control. 


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5122

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #41 on: March 20, 2019, 10:48:53 am »
It's OK to express your opinions as long as they are left wing opinions.  The sad truth is free speech is dead unless you're a far left crazy.  Marxist ideologies spread by teachers to the kids are quite common and by design.  Even speaking the views outside the classroom if they aren't far left will get you into trouble.  In Korea, no one cares.  I say shit on Facebook all the time.  A couple of teachers teaching back home in Canada messaged me in private agreeing with me and saying they admire my ability to speak.  They self censor due to their profession, even online.  Shows, the incredible unfair bias teachers are subjected to.  Thought and speech control.
I think the fact that you're posting this shows that this is not entirely true.
If you can identify a particular teacher who is spreading Marxist ideology, then the conscientious thing to do would be to speak to the local school board about it, because it's a no-no for teachers everywhere in Canada... or at least, it is in BC where I worked.

   Teachers self censor because they want to keep their jobs. Any kind of extremism, be it left or right wing will endanger it. Considering some of the people I've met here in Korea who work with kids for a living, maybe a bit of thought and speech control is a good thing. Most countries, aside from the US, recognize that 100% free speech is not particularly beneficial to society.  :undecided:


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1162

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #42 on: March 20, 2019, 11:02:17 am »
    But I also wonder where to draw the line. In this day and age, very important topics are becoming politicized, and sometimes it becomes really hard to talk about anything substantial without stepping on a political landmine. One can easily be accused of partisanship for teaching uncontroversial facts, these days.

   Does discussing the greenhouse effect and human impact on the global environment count as expressing political bias? How about the migration patterns of prehistoric human populations? WWII? Treatment of refugees? The cost-benefit of vaccines, ffs; etc etc.

this is the grey area and depends a lot on where and who you are teaching.  in most cases it's up to the teacher's better judgement to tread very carefully for a lot of subjects.  for example and off the top of my head, veganism is the 'single biggest way' to reduce our impact on the environment. is that an extreme view? or a sensible view?  it's backed up by facts and figures.  it's not really hurting anyone by mentioning it.  if students decide to become vegan or vegetarian, is that a bad thing?  not advocating this, just it's an example of a grey area, rather than the 'I'm sitting on the fence on this one' teachers.  it just depends. 

I taught at an academic high school a few years ago and we had a TED presentation contest.  one student did her presentation on 'animal cafes', and it was brilliant.  she had facts and figures and photos about how badly the animals are treated, especially the less popular or sick ones.  when you teach elementary students you should be showing a simple path for learning and a little less so in middle school. but when you teach high school, when needed, you can show a bit more of yourself opinion-wise, if needed, and within reason.  if my students ask me about Brexit, what do I tell them?  what they'll get is an opinion that doesn't hurt anyone and it's my point of view.  i don't hold some extreme views like some people on here, so I have no need to suppress the need to tell them what I'm thinking.

Thinking the leader of the Free world is a fukcing idiot isn't an extreme view?

Nope, it's just accurate. :p

As it was with George W and Ronald Reagan I guess. Was George senior also considered to be a fukcing idiot?

Not American, so I don't know US presidents; however, I thought Reagan was considered to be a great president, but the Bush before Obama was widely considered to be Trump level president, but maybe a bit better than Trump. :p

All the Presidents after Reagan up until Trump were idiots.  Bush 41 signed and negotiated NAFTA.  Clinton implemented it (2004) and then got China into the WTO or almost into it before Bush 43 confirmed it around 2001ish.  The good paying manufacturing jobs started leaving for Mexico in the 90's and then for China in the 2000's after it entered the WTO with very favorable trade terms.  The good jobs were sent away because of these men.  Ross Perot said before NAFTA was signed there would be a giant sucking sound of jobs being sucked away.  He was a billionaire and knew a thing or two about business.  He was right and was the Trump of his day in some ways.  He should have run as one of the two party candidates however. 

So, you had the tech bubble in the 90's and the fake construction boom in the 2000's.  It covered up the bad FED easy money policies and hid the manufacturing jobs being sent overseas.  There was a boom of some degree in the 90's and a recovery in the late 80's.  (Economy was sluggish with high unemployment and inflation for much of the prior 15 years from the early 70's to late 80's.)  Reagan's tax reform of 86 and OPEC putting down oil prices helped a lot to get the economy going.  But the global elites signed bad trade deals after Reagan.  (Though I guess he technically was in favor of some but never pursued one except between the US and Canada.) 

Trump is resourcing jobs back to North America and in spite of idiots in the DNC and in the fake news media, most world leaders are scared and respect Trump where ever he goes.  The Chinese are quacking in their boots while also agreeing to renegotiate things.  We may possibly even see a "reset" that take cares of fiat currencies and some of the debt.  But we shall see how far things go. 

Reagan rattled the cages of the fed.  They rattled back and he backed down on some things.  Trump pushes hard and is the most fearless leader in my lifetime.  Honestly, I can't think of too many leaders in the 20th century who were fearless.  Roosevelt who was tough on Hitler was afraid of Stalin.  Truman who was tough with the Soviets was afraid of the Chinese.  Kennedy smoked too many cigarettes nervously before meeting Krushchev even though he was the last Democrat I liked.  Johnson went to Vietnam and then held back for fear of offending the Chinese.  Nixon to Carter kowtowed to the Russians.  When has there been a President as fearless as Trump?  (Sanctions are tightened up on Russia and North Korea before one of you tries to claim he's one of their puppets.)  He's not afraid of anyone.  It use to be the Chinese and other Asians that were unpredictible and kept others on their toes.  Now it is Trump.  He is a transformational President.  FDR was with the welfare state.  (He didn't keep all of his original campaign promises either.)   


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1162

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #43 on: March 20, 2019, 11:07:54 am »
It's OK to express your opinions as long as they are left wing opinions.  The sad truth is free speech is dead unless you're a far left crazy.  Marxist ideologies spread by teachers to the kids are quite common and by design.  Even speaking the views outside the classroom if they aren't far left will get you into trouble.  In Korea, no one cares.  I say shit on Facebook all the time.  A couple of teachers teaching back home in Canada messaged me in private agreeing with me and saying they admire my ability to speak.  They self censor due to their profession, even online.  Shows, the incredible unfair bias teachers are subjected to.  Thought and speech control.
I think the fact that you're posting this shows that this is not entirely true.
If you can identify a particular teacher who is spreading Marxist ideology, then the conscientious thing to do would be to speak to the local school board about it, because it's a no-no for teachers everywhere in Canada... or at least, it is in BC where I worked.

   Teachers self censor because they want to keep their jobs. Any kind of extremism, be it left or right wing will endanger it. Considering some of the people I've met here in Korea who work with kids for a living, maybe a bit of thought and speech control is a good thing. Most countries, aside from the US, recognize that 100% free speech is not particularly beneficial to society.  :undecided:

The education system mostly has Marxist influences nowadays.  It's why the kids graduate with crazy ideology nowadays.  University pile it on more of course.  Safe spaces, shutting up free speech, teaching little kids about graphic sex like Ontario's old curriculum, telling little kids to be trannies, Trudeau style policies praised, Trump bashed, telling kids to shut down industry and that carbon taxes are a good thing.  It is course for the par nowadays back home.  Given Trudeau's slump in the polls and most provincial governments kicking out NDP and Liberal governments across the country (Yes, BC is an exception, but barely and Liberals in BC really aren't Liberal at the local level) do show the beginning of a pushing back against this crap in society.  The only folks protesting for leftist garbage nowadays are mostly high school or college kids pushed on by their teachers. 


Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #44 on: March 20, 2019, 11:30:46 am »
It's OK to express your opinions as long as they are left wing opinions.  The sad truth is free speech is dead unless you're a far left crazy.  Marxist ideologies spread by teachers to the kids are quite common and by design.  Even speaking the views outside the classroom if they aren't far left will get you into trouble.  In Korea, no one cares.  I say shit on Facebook all the time.  A couple of teachers teaching back home in Canada messaged me in private agreeing with me and saying they admire my ability to speak.  They self censor due to their profession, even online.  Shows, the incredible unfair bias teachers are subjected to.  Thought and speech control.
I think the fact that you're posting this shows that this is not entirely true.
This is the reverse of the people who claim Trump is a fascist and the media is under assault...while everyone rails on Trump and mocks him 24-7. Yeah Trump sure has silenced you.  :rolleyes:

As far as free speech. Most countries think rights are something granted to the people by the state. In the U.S., people believe the government and its laws exist through consent of the people. The government shall NOT infringe the people's right to free speech rather than Her Majesty's Government grants her subjects the right to free speech.


Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #45 on: March 20, 2019, 11:32:48 am »
It's OK to express your opinions as long as they are left wing opinions.  The sad truth is free speech is dead unless you're a far left crazy.  Marxist ideologies spread by teachers to the kids are quite common and by design.  Even speaking the views outside the classroom if they aren't far left will get you into trouble.  In Korea, no one cares.  I say shit on Facebook all the time.  A couple of teachers teaching back home in Canada messaged me in private agreeing with me and saying they admire my ability to speak.  They self censor due to their profession, even online.  Shows, the incredible unfair bias teachers are subjected to.  Thought and speech control.
I think the fact that you're posting this shows that this is not entirely true.
If you can identify a particular teacher who is spreading Marxist ideology, then the conscientious thing to do would be to speak to the local school board about it, because it's a no-no for teachers everywhere in Canada... or at least, it is in BC where I worked.

   Teachers self censor because they want to keep their jobs. Any kind of extremism, be it left or right wing will endanger it. Considering some of the people I've met here in Korea who work with kids for a living, maybe a bit of thought and speech control is a good thing. Most countries, aside from the US, recognize that 100% free speech is not particularly beneficial to society.  :undecided:

The education system mostly has Marxist influences nowadays.  It's why the kids graduate with crazy ideology nowadays.  University pile it on more of course.  Safe spaces, shutting up free speech, teaching little kids about graphic sex like Ontario's old curriculum, telling little kids to be trannies, Trudeau style policies praised, Trump bashed, telling kids to shut down industry and that carbon taxes are a good thing.  It is course for the par nowadays back home.  Given Trudeau's slump in the polls and most provincial governments kicking out NDP and Liberal governments across the country (Yes, BC is an exception, but barely and Liberals in BC really aren't Liberal at the local level) do show the beginning of a pushing back against this crap in society.  The only folks protesting for leftist garbage nowadays are mostly high school or college kids pushed on by their teachers.

And women. 70% of millennial women are/lean towards democrats.

https://www.vox.com/2018/3/21/17144602/gender-gap-democrat-liberal-women


Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #46 on: March 20, 2019, 11:41:07 am »
It's OK to express your opinions as long as they are left wing opinions.  The sad truth is free speech is dead unless you're a far left crazy.  Marxist ideologies spread by teachers to the kids are quite common and by design.  Even speaking the views outside the classroom if they aren't far left will get you into trouble.  In Korea, no one cares.  I say shit on Facebook all the time.  A couple of teachers teaching back home in Canada messaged me in private agreeing with me and saying they admire my ability to speak.  They self censor due to their profession, even online.  Shows, the incredible unfair bias teachers are subjected to.  Thought and speech control.
I think the fact that you're posting this shows that this is not entirely true.
If you can identify a particular teacher who is spreading Marxist ideology, then the conscientious thing to do would be to speak to the local school board about it, because it's a no-no for teachers everywhere in Canada... or at least, it is in BC where I worked.

   Teachers self censor because they want to keep their jobs. Any kind of extremism, be it left or right wing will endanger it. Considering some of the people I've met here in Korea who work with kids for a living, maybe a bit of thought and speech control is a good thing. Most countries, aside from the US, recognize that 100% free speech is not particularly beneficial to society.  :undecided:

The education system mostly has Marxist influences nowadays.  It's why the kids graduate with crazy ideology nowadays.  University pile it on more of course.  Safe spaces, shutting up free speech, teaching little kids about graphic sex like Ontario's old curriculum, telling little kids to be trannies, Trudeau style policies praised, Trump bashed, telling kids to shut down industry and that carbon taxes are a good thing.  It is course for the par nowadays back home.  Given Trudeau's slump in the polls and most provincial governments kicking out NDP and Liberal governments across the country (Yes, BC is an exception, but barely and Liberals in BC really aren't Liberal at the local level) do show the beginning of a pushing back against this crap in society.  The only folks protesting for leftist garbage nowadays are mostly high school or college kids pushed on by their teachers.

But the part where Marx implores educators to "tell kids to be trannies" was my favorite part of Das Kapital. Do you mean to say that this very real thing that almost all Canadian school teachers are definitely doing is objectionable to some folks?


Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #47 on: March 20, 2019, 11:53:31 am »
It's OK to express your opinions as long as they are left wing opinions.  The sad truth is free speech is dead unless you're a far left crazy.  Marxist ideologies spread by teachers to the kids are quite common and by design.  Even speaking the views outside the classroom if they aren't far left will get you into trouble.  In Korea, no one cares.  I say shit on Facebook all the time.  A couple of teachers teaching back home in Canada messaged me in private agreeing with me and saying they admire my ability to speak.  They self censor due to their profession, even online.  Shows, the incredible unfair bias teachers are subjected to.  Thought and speech control.
I think the fact that you're posting this shows that this is not entirely true.
If you can identify a particular teacher who is spreading Marxist ideology, then the conscientious thing to do would be to speak to the local school board about it, because it's a no-no for teachers everywhere in Canada... or at least, it is in BC where I worked.

   Teachers self censor because they want to keep their jobs. Any kind of extremism, be it left or right wing will endanger it. Considering some of the people I've met here in Korea who work with kids for a living, maybe a bit of thought and speech control is a good thing. Most countries, aside from the US, recognize that 100% free speech is not particularly beneficial to society.  :undecided:

Lindsay Shepard was brought in front of a Maoist tribunal at Wilfrid Laurier University for playing a clip from a publicly funded current affairs show.


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5122

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #48 on: March 20, 2019, 12:01:20 pm »
I think the fact that you're posting this shows that this is not entirely true.
If you can identify a particular teacher who is spreading Marxist ideology, then the conscientious thing to do would be to speak to the local school board about it, because it's a no-no for teachers everywhere in Canada... or at least, it is in BC where I worked.

   Teachers self censor because they want to keep their jobs. Any kind of extremism, be it left or right wing will endanger it. Considering some of the people I've met here in Korea who work with kids for a living, maybe a bit of thought and speech control is a good thing. Most countries, aside from the US, recognize that 100% free speech is not particularly beneficial to society.  :undecided:

Lindsay Shepard was brought in front of a Maoist tribunal at Wilfrid Laurier University for playing a clip from a publicly funded current affairs show.

That's godawful.
But either that's the exception that proves the rule, or else I've been in Korea too long and society back home has morphed into something disturbingly unfamiliar.

   Out of curiosity, what did she play?


  • CO2
  • The Legend

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    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
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Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #49 on: March 20, 2019, 12:08:31 pm »
Out of curiosity, what did she play?

A clip of Jordan Peterson on TVO, the "PBS" of my province.

I went back after 6 years to Toronto and it did seem more touchy about a lot of stuff. These are all people who have never left Toronto and have a super "worldly" view. This isn't to say that I'm right about things right off the bat for travelling a lot, but I wish that the people who claim that Toronto is very multicultural would actually show that and treat people equally. They seem to treat a lot of non-whites like some sort of children that need protecting. It's frustrating. I do a Korean voice in my stories and I'm racist/insensitive, I copy my French/British friend, no one bats a bloody eye.

Korean people don't need saving by Jeff the White Canadian who has never left Southern Ontario.
The joys of fauxtherhood


Re: Educators Expressing Political Opinions- At home and abroad
« Reply #50 on: March 20, 2019, 12:23:43 pm »
I think the fact that you're posting this shows that this is not entirely true.
If you can identify a particular teacher who is spreading Marxist ideology, then the conscientious thing to do would be to speak to the local school board about it, because it's a no-no for teachers everywhere in Canada... or at least, it is in BC where I worked.

   Teachers self censor because they want to keep their jobs. Any kind of extremism, be it left or right wing will endanger it. Considering some of the people I've met here in Korea who work with kids for a living, maybe a bit of thought and speech control is a good thing. Most countries, aside from the US, recognize that 100% free speech is not particularly beneficial to society.  :undecided:

Lindsay Shepard was brought in front of a Maoist tribunal at Wilfrid Laurier University for playing a clip from a publicly funded current affairs show.

That's godawful.
But either that's the exception that proves the rule, or else I've been in Korea too long and society back home has morphed into something disturbingly unfamiliar.

   Out of curiosity, what did she play?

Yes, it's awful, but she got a fulsome apology from the university president and at least one of the professors involved. The president wrote that there were:

Quote
"numerous errors in judgement made in the handling of the meeting". The meeting should not have taken place... because "[n]o formal complaint, nor informal concern relative to a Laurier policy, was registered about the screening of the video." [The president] concluded that there had been "no wrongdoing on the part of Ms. Shepherd in showing the clip from TVO in her tutorial".

A university report into the incident also condemned the way that it had been handled, and found fault only with the people who called the meeting with Shepard. Furthermore, it concluded that the original student complaint which triggered the meeting didn't meet the criteria for action under the university's fairness and equality guidelines - hence, the unofficial meeting that Shepard recorded never should have happened.

All of which undercuts the argument that the event is a reflection of official education policy.