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Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« on: February 27, 2019, 02:09:59 am »
TEACHERS PLEASE BE AWARE OF THIS AND READ!

Here at my school where I work, there are two police officers who are
talking to my students about an online bullying troll who is threatening
children with what they call the Momo Challenge.

I don't know if this Momo Challenge is happening in South Korea, but in
Canada where I am it is happening! Momo challenge is found on Snapchat,
You Tube, Twitter, Minecraft, and Facebook etc. The Momo Challenge is some
cyberbullying thing that is drawing in kids to challenge them to do things that
are very deplorable, and controlling their minds to do anything that is causing
them to get threatened if they don't do what the Momo says. It is very intimidating,
and there are teachers and counsellors who are helping some kids I see who are
very scared and crying.

The fact that social media is global, kids all over the world are getting acces to it.
On their laptops, tablets, and smart phones. If you are a parent and you see it on
your child's device, please do all you can by any means necessary to block it! If you
have to go as far as calling the police to report the Momo challenge cyberbullying your
child/student, go as far as to call the police to report it.

The internet is becoming very dangerous for our children, please talk to your kids about
the Momo challenge and liberate them to ignore that ugly image that is traumatizing them!


  • SanderB
  • Super Waygook

    • 441

    • June 02, 2018, 06:25:54 pm
    • Burning Oil Be Best
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2019, 02:53:19 am »
+1
Fiat voluntas tua- What you want is allowed


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2567

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2019, 07:11:12 am »
Yeah PLEASE MAKE SURE TO VIEW ALL YOUTUBE VIDEOS to its entirety before showing them in the classroom.  Word on the street was that some trolls have been sneaking in some bad stuff for shock value. 

Like even some of the stuff made here in Korea for Korean ESL students, one video I think from English SingSing had a video that abruptly stopped and it kept jump cutting.  It was strange and weirded out my kids too.  Thankfully it wasn't shocking just weird. 

But yeah sadly some of my kids want to write about "Slender Man" and one of my students has been talking about "Granny"  and drawing pictures of a bloody woman.  I don't know who "Granny" is but I heard it might be from those Annabell doll movies.  Not sure.  If anyone knows let me know. 

But I have a firm rule:  NO GUNS, NO KNIVES, NO HEADS CUT OFF, NO DIE, NO DDONG (sh*t) 

Over the years I've had to use this rule less and less but at the hakwon level my kids there were ALWAYS DRAWING funnel cones of sh*t and bloody bodies  >:( >:(  Got really damn annoying considering we'd either send this art work home to parents or hang it up in the hallways for others parents to see.  My class was rarely up for selection to go in the hallway because of this garbage!!!
« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 07:23:08 am by Piggydee »


  • lhelena
  • Adventurer

    • 53

    • March 11, 2018, 01:57:14 pm
    • Anseong
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2019, 07:33:51 am »
I had thought the whole Momo thing was over when Whatsapp all but shutdown because of it. Momo came and went pretty quickly at my school during summer camp this year. Some of my kids were trying to do it during free-time and it didn't work (you're supposed to video call some number on whatsapp that is now gone and this Momo person is supposed to answer and be creepy). I think my kids realized it was all a load of crap because they all lost interest in minutes. It wasn't until later that I found out that in South America (where it started) a bunch of kids committed suicide over this "hacker" or "troll" threatening them/blackmailing them or their families.
When it first came around it wasn't a challenge though so I'm not sure what kind of sick transformation this crap has taken but I'm definitely going to be on the lookout for it.

Edit: I'm also a little surprised that this is the first time it's being talked about on here. This is old news to be frank. Late last year it was being talked about in the news internationally for months. As teachers we need to be more aware of what our students are into. That means we should pay more attention to internet culture and the things that our students are interested in that may not be as mainstream as Minecraft or Marvel. As teachers we see a different side of our students than their parents do. We see them interacting with their classmates. And I'm sure none of them went home and were telling their parents about Momo, so it's on us if we hear them whispering about some weird "internet ghost", as my kids called it, and do nothing to at least look into it and get more info.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 07:45:30 am by lhelena »


  • JVPrice
  • Expert Waygook

    • 779

    • August 29, 2017, 10:26:13 am
    • Cheongju
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2019, 07:38:31 am »
I heard this was a big thing in Japan a while back.

As said above, it is scary considering how many kids have unlimited access to the Internet (parents need to do better). It's hard to prevent in any case, but we should definitely be cautious when using video in class as always.
The World Ends With You


  • CO2
  • The Legend

    • 4541

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
    more
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2019, 08:03:44 am »
Well, googling Momo Challenge and seeing the pictures that come up is truly unsettling. Jesus.
The joys of fauxtherhood


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2567

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2019, 08:42:41 am »
I wonder how Joji aka Filthy Frank feels about all of this considering one of his videos was sliced into a kid video.  He has yet to comment.   Side ways for attention, Longways for results.  Kind of catchy if you ask me but very sad.  I've watched quite a few of Filthy Frank's videos but I don't remember this one or the humor behind it. 


Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2019, 10:06:25 am »
https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-47393510

Momo Challenge: The Anatomy of a Hoax

"Following a flurry of scare stories, some schools have warned parents about the "momo challenge" - but fact-checkers say it is a hoax.

The original tale said a character with bulging eyes would "hack" into WhatsApp and set children dangerous "challenges" such as harming themselves.

Charities say there have been no reports of anybody being "hacked" or harming themselves as a result.

But the image is now being shared on social media to frighten children.

It has been found edited into unofficial copies of children's cartoons such as Peppa Pig on YouTube.

"News coverage of the momo challenge is prompting schools or the police to warn about the supposed risks posed by the momo challenge, which has in turn produced more news stories warning about the challenge," said the Guardian media editor Jim Waterson.
What is 'momo'?

In February, versions of the momo story went viral on social media. They attracted hundreds of thousands of shares and resulted in news stories reporting the tale.

According to the story, children are contacted on WhatsApp by an account claiming to be momo. Some versions of the tale suggested "hackers" made the image appear on the phone unexpectedly.

Children are supposedly encouraged to save the character as a contact and are then asked to carry out challenges, as well as being told not to tell other members of their family.

The UK Safer Internet Centre told the Guardian that it was "fake news".

However, unofficial copies of cartoons such as Peppa Pig have been uploaded to YouTube with footage of "momo" edited in. Children watching unofficial uploads may therefore be exposed to the distressing images.

Several articles claimed the momo challenge had been "linked" to the deaths of 130 teenagers in Russia. The reports have not been corroborated by the relevant authorities.

On Wednesday, police in Northern Ireland sought to reassure parents about the doll figure with bulging eyes.

The image of momo is actually a photo of a sculpture by Japanese special-effects company Link Factory. According to pop-culture website Know Your Meme, it first gained attention in 2016.
'Urban legend'

Fact-checking website Snopes suggested the story was "far more hype or hoax than reality", but warned the images could still cause distress to children.

"The subject has generated rumours that in themselves can be cause for concern among children," wrote David Mikkelson on the site.

Police in the UK have not reported any instances of children harming themselves due to the momo meme.

The charity Samaritans said it was "not aware of any verified evidence in this country or beyond" linking the momo meme to self-harm.

The NSPCC told the Guardian it had received more calls from newspapers than from concerned parents.
What should parents do?

Police have suggested that rather than focusing on the specific momo meme, parents could use the opportunity to educate children about internet safety, as well as having an open conversation about what children are accessing.

"This is merely a current, attention-grabbing example of the minefield that is online communication for kids," wrote the Police Service of Northern Ireland, in a Facebook post.

Broadcaster Andy Robertson, who creates videos online as Geek Dad, said in a podcast that parents should not "share warnings that perpetuate and mythologise the story".

"A better focus is good positive advice for children, setting up technology appropriately and taking an interest in their online interactions," he said.

To avoid causing unnecessary alarm, parents should also be careful about sharing news articles with other adults that perpetuate the myth. "


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2567

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2019, 10:29:51 am »
I guess the MOMO Challenge is Little Mickey/Pop Rocks/Soda urban myth for the 2000s.   Just like Steven from Blue's Clues Od'ing in the 90s.   :rolleyes:


Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2019, 10:30:05 am »

But I have a firm rule:  NO GUNS,

Yeah, that lack of gun drawing really is all that's keeping them from shooting up the school.

I also told my kids NO TANKS NO AIRPLANES NO NUCLEAR BOMBS

If they start drawing those, they might hop into an F-16 and fire a couple of AGM-65s at the school!

They might not stop drawing such things the rest of their life!





I mean, this one has a gun AND a minor smoking!


Yes, kids should have nothing to do with images involving guns and acts of violence.

No guns, no knives, no poop, no blood. And we wonder why kids are bored out of their skulls at school. I know what will solve that- Let's read another book about sharing and Peanut Allergies!


Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2019, 10:33:02 am »
but we do have the hilarious '48-hour challenge'...


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2567

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2019, 10:41:07 am »


No guns, no knives, no poop, no blood. And we wonder why kids are bored out of their skulls at school. I know what will solve that- Let's read another book about sharing and Peanut Allergies!


Great point Teacher of Year! But it's not me being a creativity curmudgeon.  Usually the parents call the school and ask why their child was allowed to draw such things, which leads to me getting an ear full from the assistant director as to why I didn't tell the child to erase it and start over.  And if you read my previous post, it's also another reason why my class' art work NEVER hung out in the hallways for other parents to see because my "creative out of the box thinking" kids kept drawing poop and guns etc. and the higher ups hated it.  Didn't say that my no violence rule would prevent a school shooting (thankfully we are in a country that ACTUALLY HAS GUN LAWS AND USES THEM!!)  but if that kid wants to be the next Martin Scorsese or Quentin Tarantino, I don't think my little rule of No guns, no blood, no poop on a piece of art work that is going to hang up in their homeroom or be presented briefly in front of class for a quick moment and then stuffed in their cubbies or backpack is going to stifle their future creativity.  So why don't you just come off it Mr. Freedom Writer Teacher.   :rolleyes:


Wow you must think I hover over them during their free time and tell them not to draw pictures of made up cartoon characters or violence.  I allow them to do that because THEY ARE KIDS! 
« Last Edit: March 04, 2019, 03:10:01 pm by Piggydee »


Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2019, 10:42:45 am »
I've heard people talk about this from back home and then the whole posts talking about how it is a hoax and everything.

But I've had a couple of my kids here in Korea try and explain Momo to me a few months ago, their English level isn't very good and so I just assumed it was another weird kids thing but now I know that she must have seen it on youtube. Korean 7 years old here.

As someone else already pointed out, all my kids know Slender Man. They don't seem perturbed by it but it's pretty messed up!


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 3983

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2019, 11:32:40 am »
https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-47393510

Momo Challenge: The Anatomy of a Hoax

"...

The NSPCC told the Guardian it had received more calls from newspapers than from concerned parents.
What should parents do?

Police have suggested that rather than focusing on the specific momo meme, parents could use the opportunity to educate children about internet safety, as well as having an open conversation about what children are accessing.

"This is merely a current, attention-grabbing example of the minefield that is online communication for kids," wrote the Police Service of Northern Ireland, in a Facebook post.



Thatís what I did with my son.


Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2019, 09:55:58 am »
This is going to sound cold as heck, but part of life is the fact that every year a few kids will die because they do something stupid. That's just how it is.

You have to let them go out and play by themselves. You have to accept that they might see some messed up crap on the internet. You have to accept that they'll get sick or break a bone. You have to accept that they might fight each other.

It's like your immune system. You have to let people build themselves up. Along the way there will be some uncomfortable days and maybe a few people will drop dead. But you can't have everyone walking around in biohazard suits.


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5122

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2019, 10:15:44 am »
This is going to sound cold as heck, but part of life is the fact that every year a few kids will die because they do something stupid. That's just how it is.

You have to let them go out and play by themselves. You have to accept that they might see some messed up crap on the internet. You have to accept that they'll get sick or break a bone. You have to accept that they might fight each other.

It's like your immune system. You have to let people build themselves up. Along the way there will be some uncomfortable days and maybe a few people will drop dead. But you can't have everyone walking around in biohazard suits.

That's as may be, but some dangers aren't inherently intuitive. Toddlers instinctively fear arachnids, and some idiot 2 year old that dies while playing in a wheelbarrow brimming with tarantulas, scorpions, and blackwidows is probably an example of Darwinism at work. On the other hand, most toddlers needs to be taught that sticking forks into electrical sockets is a bad idea. There's no natural reason why a toddler would avoid doing that on its own volition.

   Similarly, children need to be taught that the internet has a dark side, and should be prepared by their parents to deal with things like cyber-bullying, stalking, catfishing, etc.

   It's like expecting some FOB English teacher to know the ins-and-outs of NEIS, Hometax, and the intricacies of Korean labour laws. Things like that just need to be explained before they can be properly prepared for.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2019, 10:18:44 am by kyndo »


  • hangook77
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1156

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #16 on: March 20, 2019, 11:11:42 am »
Yeah PLEASE MAKE SURE TO VIEW ALL YOUTUBE VIDEOS to its entirety before showing them in the classroom.  Word on the street was that some trolls have been sneaking in some bad stuff for shock value. 

Like even some of the stuff made here in Korea for Korean ESL students, one video I think from English SingSing had a video that abruptly stopped and it kept jump cutting.  It was strange and weirded out my kids too.  Thankfully it wasn't shocking just weird. 

But yeah sadly some of my kids want to write about "Slender Man" and one of my students has been talking about "Granny"  and drawing pictures of a bloody woman.  I don't know who "Granny" is but I heard it might be from those Annabell doll movies.  Not sure.  If anyone knows let me know. 

But I have a firm rule:  NO GUNS, NO KNIVES, NO HEADS CUT OFF, NO DIE, NO DDONG (sh*t) 

Over the years I've had to use this rule less and less but at the hakwon level my kids there were ALWAYS DRAWING funnel cones of sh*t and bloody bodies  >:( >:(  Got really damn annoying considering we'd either send this art work home to parents or hang it up in the hallways for others parents to see.  My class was rarely up for selection to go in the hallway because of this garbage!!!

Shit is part of the culture in case you haven't seen teh cartoons and the stuffed figures.  Some kind of meme here for years.  So, it's the culture.  As for die and blood, well, they do watch horror movies a lot here and are allowed to for some reason.  But the kids mostly don't have broken homes and broken families meaning they don't watch this crap and go kill people like in the west. 


Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #17 on: March 20, 2019, 11:28:47 am »
Have y'all realized this was a hoax that you scare mongered yourselves with by spreading it throughout social media?   :laugh:
Who is here in 2019?


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2567

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Momo Challenge (CYBER BULLYING)
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2019, 12:57:58 pm »
Yeah PLEASE MAKE SURE TO VIEW ALL YOUTUBE VIDEOS to its entirety before showing them in the classroom.  Word on the street was that some trolls have been sneaking in some bad stuff for shock value. 

Like even some of the stuff made here in Korea for Korean ESL students, one video I think from English SingSing had a video that abruptly stopped and it kept jump cutting.  It was strange and weirded out my kids too.  Thankfully it wasn't shocking just weird. 

But yeah sadly some of my kids want to write about "Slender Man" and one of my students has been talking about "Granny"  and drawing pictures of a bloody woman.  I don't know who "Granny" is but I heard it might be from those Annabell doll movies.  Not sure.  If anyone knows let me know. 

But I have a firm rule:  NO GUNS, NO KNIVES, NO HEADS CUT OFF, NO DIE, NO DDONG (sh*t) 

Over the years I've had to use this rule less and less but at the hakwon level my kids there were ALWAYS DRAWING funnel cones of sh*t and bloody bodies  >:( >:(  Got really damn annoying considering we'd either send this art work home to parents or hang it up in the hallways for others parents to see.  My class was rarely up for selection to go in the hallway because of this garbage!!!

Shit is part of the culture in case you haven't seen teh cartoons and the stuffed figures.  Some kind of meme here for years.  So, it's the culture.  As for die and blood, well, they do watch horror movies a lot here and are allowed to for some reason.  But the kids mostly don't have broken homes and broken families meaning they don't watch this crap and go kill people like in the west.

Yep I'm aware that poop is fascinating here.  There is a toilet museum after all.  If it's artwork that I'm hanging up in class or my students are presenting to the class, then I discourage it.  If it's something they want to draw in their textbooks than KNOCK YOURSELF OUT!  Don't care!  Even the Korean teachers want to present the children's best work for the parents on parents day or open class time.  Hence why I've never seen final project art work with shit all over it.