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  • Oupa Grey
  • Adventurer

    • 40

    • January 29, 2019, 10:56:47 am
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Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #20 on: February 18, 2019, 01:01:13 pm »
Flying in China fuckin sucks.

Everything in China f&%n sucks. Wait, correction: there are an abundance of jobs here.

Every one of those jobs has the same problem though: They are in China.

Yeah, but if Korea keeps its wages the same and not going up.  There will be more and more headed over there.

Yup, lots of ex-Korea teachers here. If you come here with a plan and know what to expect, it isn't so bad. I knew it was gonna be two years, have some goals - the job gives me time to get them done, and I'll be out soon. There have been some good times and I was open to being pleasantly surprised and wanting to live in different cities here and stay longer - but China aint the place man.

If you come here because you're sick of Korea and the culture and daily living gets on your nerves.... :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:  Well, just come. See for yourself what it's like. At the very least it will make you appreciate Korea and consider another stint back there.

Have you bumped into any IELTS examiners over there? They were advertising recently saying you could make up to 70 grand a year (UK) I was wondering how many that was actually true for.

Actually a guy I worked with last year left this job to be an IELTS instructor - I'll ask about what they make but that sounds excessive. Double or more than what the fancy international schools in Beijing are offering.

Look people, I shared a story too. Could I get at least a token put-down?  >:(

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

That, my friend, is a story.

And you, my friend, are cringy as hell. But do share your address so we can all post you a medal for being having such an impressive life.

you took the words right out of my mouth.

spqr - i guess congrats on having a different story than OP? 

...but a little succinctness helps.


And then you went on to write some long-winded, boring, random...fiction? What was that all about??


I shared a random slice of Chinese life story about what general life can be like living here - all the insecure types trying to define what a story should be and rushing in for some oneupmanship - relax your keyboard stallions. It's just a story.

OP - i thought the story was genuinely interesting. i've had periods where i've put a lot of thought into going to china and was always more curious about the day to day rather than the actual teaching i'd be doing.

demartino - the sht you say when you're trying to be "funny" or "one of the guys" is SUPER weird.

Yeah that's partly why I wrote it. It depends where you are on what you do with your time - but China is a mix of lots of cool stuff and a convenience outweighed by some massive dealbreakers - with the political climate here and increased rules and surveillance, and also getting to know the place and Chinese friends more deeply - I'm currently more in the side of recommending that people DON'T come here. People are friendly (which you can pretty much say for anywhere in the world) but the culture seems a little broken. It doesn't take long to see the cracks and what's actually lying beneath the surface. I mean, you can live and be happy anywhere if you keep to whatever bubble you wanna put yourself in - but I have gradually come to see this country as an all round horrible place. Like I did, if you're interested in seeing for yourself you will probably come anyway - you'll probably at least enjoy the first year before the reality of the place sets in. And the work life can be way more relaxed than in Korea....as long as you're careful when choosing your position. I can't imagine working here in a hagwon type gig or public school with 50 kids who behave like animals, and on top of it just for the pleasure of living in this hole. The job has to be MUCH better than what you're currently doing to come over here and enjoy it. Just coming for the money isn't worth it.

Teaching in China is about the same as any country for ESL, sometimes you luck out other times you don't.

Living in China is different. I went there in 2016 and stayed for just over 2 years till Winnie the Pooh decided to change visa rules and so I had to leave. 

The common Chinese folk I met and taught were just awesome, some of the finest people I have ever met. Of course you get an a**hole every now and again but mostly they are awesome.

The government, the almighty CCP........ well that is another story.  They are a spawn of Satan and they are slowly but surely turning China into another NK and unfortunately the common people are to naive (indoctrinated) to see it.  Life is becoming more and more difficult there as a citizen and foreigner. The common folk are completely blinded by the wealth they see in the big cities but underneath it all especially in the rural areas there is grinding poverty.

Winnie the Pooh is hell-bent on taking over the world (doing it with money) and that is going to blow up in his face soon. He is spending money they don't have on buying Africa and SE Asia, all in his plan to dominate the world.

Scary times. I loved my time there but I am glad I have left and now I am in chill Taiwan. Taiwan is what mainland China would be like with no CCP.

Yup - pretty much all this.

And I would agree that I've met some amazing people here BUT it can be hard to know sometimes. Chinese people are amazingly good at acting like they are your friend in the hopes of receiving future benefits from the relationship - or at saying one thing with a genuine smile and then doing something else. It's a fake society through and through.


Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2019, 02:13:02 pm »
Quote
Actually a guy I worked with last year left this job to be an IELTS instructor - I'll ask about what they make but that sounds excessive. Double or more than what the fancy international schools in Beijing are offering.

https://jobs.britishcouncil.org/Vacancies/W/5930/0/175043/5448/ielts-examiner-china-chi-ielts1/


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • The Legend

    • 4990

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
    more
Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #22 on: February 18, 2019, 03:05:01 pm »
And I would agree that I've met some amazing people here BUT it can be hard to know sometimes. Chinese people are amazingly good at acting like they are your friend in the hopes of receiving future benefits from the relationship - or at saying one thing with a genuine smile and then doing something else. It's a fake society through and through.


I would say that is a bit of a generalisation. Even though I am not there anymore, I still have good friends that talk to me all the time online and some of their friends that I taught ask about me still. I found more genuine people and fake people, I must say.

Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • Oupa Grey
  • Adventurer

    • 40

    • January 29, 2019, 10:56:47 am
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Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #23 on: February 18, 2019, 07:50:40 pm »
And I would agree that I've met some amazing people here BUT it can be hard to know sometimes. Chinese people are amazingly good at acting like they are your friend in the hopes of receiving future benefits from the relationship - or at saying one thing with a genuine smile and then doing something else. It's a fake society through and through.


I would say that is a bit of a generalisation. Even though I am not there anymore, I still have good friends that talk to me all the time online and some of their friends that I taught ask about me still. I found more genuine people and fake people, I must say.

Hmm...it is a generalization, but there is also a lot of truth in it. It seems to be baked into the culture - people form relationships for mutual benefit or don't bother. It can be seen most clearly in anything involving money - it's no secret that money is God here and people will do anything to gain an inch financially regardless of the moral implications or consequences. The better people here suffer for it, as does the world really with all the Chinese debt trap nonsense (among other things), but saying and acting in a way that is expected yet having a ulterior motives (not necessarily malicious ones) is a very common thing.

Put it down to a climate where you cannot express your opinion or it could lead to some serious trouble, so people get used to almost splitting their personalities. You can see it clearly by talking about an almost controversial topic in class in a group - everyone will have the same answer and they will become agitated and stiff if you question something that is the official story or involves something the CCP did to a fellow citizen that was a bit too harsh. But get them 1-1, behind closed doors - and suddenly one or two will start with the "don't tell ANYONE I said this, but...." and then out comes an opinion that would be completely mild in any other country but that they've buried deep down and are just waiting to express. I mean, the students are great and haven't all been as brainwashed yet, so I feel for them - but that kind of climate messes people up. Acting one way while hiding your true feelings becomes the norm.

I will add that I too have met a couple of extremely genuine people here who I would trust as much as anyone - but that isn't a special characteristic of China, you find amazing people everywhere. In some ways it becomes sad because those genuine ones you meet have to make their way HERE, under THIS bloody government - and also, they are not exempt from ignorance and brainwashing. The things they say sometimes.... :undecided:

PS - you are in an awesome place right now confusedsaffaintaiwan. Same people. Different government. What a difference.

I would compare it to Korea, but I've come to realize that there is no point. China is China, Korea is Korea. I have met amazing people in both places, and both have pros and cons. I will say however that I spent 7 years in Korea and would go back for the right job in a heartbeat - whereas I'm approaching 2 years here and am so excited and happy to get out and never return. Will I miss certain things and people? Definitely. But I am really looking forward to the next stage of life.

I'm open to any daily life questions if anyone wants to know - it's not secret that I don't like it here but I will pretty much say the good or the bad as it is. I don't regret coming here one bit.

Off the top of my head I will say this: The most recent notification I received about rules and things here is that the banks will now be investigating all foreigners with more than (800 000 won) in their accounts and all transactions will be tracked and reported to the Gov (that part isn't exactly new), and it will be checked where the money in the account comes from and if people are on the correct visa. While you are being checked, your account can be frozen. And the gov has the right to keep the money in your account.

You get these kinds of things coming up all the time - letting you know who is in charge and how you will be punished. It builds up and gets tiresome - even if you are honest, have nothing to worry about and just shake to off. Those who do best in China are probably those who don't read independent news, who keep blinkers on, don't question things and just live and have fun.


  • Oupa Grey
  • Adventurer

    • 40

    • January 29, 2019, 10:56:47 am
    more
Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #24 on: February 18, 2019, 07:52:14 pm »
Quote
Actually a guy I worked with last year left this job to be an IELTS instructor - I'll ask about what they make but that sounds excessive. Double or more than what the fancy international schools in Beijing are offering.

https://jobs.britishcouncil.org/Vacancies/W/5930/0/175043/5448/ielts-examiner-china-chi-ielts1/

Niiiiice - if I find out from him what the conditions are to get the higher end of that I'll post back here.


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • The Legend

    • 4990

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
    more
Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2019, 06:12:50 am »
And I would agree that I've met some amazing people here BUT it can be hard to know sometimes. Chinese people are amazingly good at acting like they are your friend in the hopes of receiving future benefits from the relationship - or at saying one thing with a genuine smile and then doing something else. It's a fake society through and through.


I would say that is a bit of a generalisation. Even though I am not there anymore, I still have good friends that talk to me all the time online and some of their friends that I taught ask about me still. I found more genuine people and fake people, I must say.

Hmm...it is a generalization, but there is also a lot of truth in it. It seems to be baked into the culture - people form relationships for mutual benefit or don't bother. It can be seen most clearly in anything involving money - it's no secret that money is God here and people will do anything to gain an inch financially regardless of the moral implications or consequences. The better people here suffer for it, as does the world really with all the Chinese debt trap nonsense (among other things), but saying and acting in a way that is expected yet having a ulterior motives (not necessarily malicious ones) is a very common thing.

Put it down to a climate where you cannot express your opinion or it could lead to some serious trouble, so people get used to almost splitting their personalities. You can see it clearly by talking about an almost controversial topic in class in a group - everyone will have the same answer and they will become agitated and stiff if you question something that is the official story or involves something the CCP did to a fellow citizen that was a bit too harsh. But get them 1-1, behind closed doors - and suddenly one or two will start with the "don't tell ANYONE I said this, but...." and then out comes an opinion that would be completely mild in any other country but that they've buried deep down and are just waiting to express. I mean, the students are great and haven't all been as brainwashed yet, so I feel for them - but that kind of climate messes people up. Acting one way while hiding your true feelings becomes the norm.

I will add that I too have met a couple of extremely genuine people here who I would trust as much as anyone - but that isn't a special characteristic of China, you find amazing people everywhere. In some ways it becomes sad because those genuine ones you meet have to make their way HERE, under THIS bloody government - and also, they are not exempt from ignorance and brainwashing. The things they say sometimes.... :undecided:

PS - you are in an awesome place right now confusedsaffaintaiwan. Same people. Different government. What a difference.

I would compare it to Korea, but I've come to realize that there is no point. China is China, Korea is Korea. I have met amazing people in both places, and both have pros and cons. I will say however that I spent 7 years in Korea and would go back for the right job in a heartbeat - whereas I'm approaching 2 years here and am so excited and happy to get out and never return. Will I miss certain things and people? Definitely. But I am really looking forward to the next stage of life.

I'm open to any daily life questions if anyone wants to know - it's not secret that I don't like it here but I will pretty much say the good or the bad as it is. I don't regret coming here one bit.

Off the top of my head I will say this: The most recent notification I received about rules and things here is that the banks will now be investigating all foreigners with more than (800 000 won) in their accounts and all transactions will be tracked and reported to the Gov (that part isn't exactly new), and it will be checked where the money in the account comes from and if people are on the correct visa. While you are being checked, your account can be frozen. And the gov has the right to keep the money in your account.

You get these kinds of things coming up all the time - letting you know who is in charge and how you will be punished. It builds up and gets tiresome - even if you are honest, have nothing to worry about and just shake to off. Those who do best in China are probably those who don't read independent news, who keep blinkers on, don't question things and just live and have fun.

The biggest problem in China is the CCP in general and Winnie the Pooh in particular, he is completely insane.

A word of caution, be careful what you say to people there even in private, the CCP has many, many seemly innocent people working for them.

A Chinese friend of mine told me about this incident. Two of his friends were walking in a park, they were talking about Chairman Mao and his friend made some negative comment. The next day he arrived home, there were some goons waiting for him. They smashed his apartment to pieces and beat him up and left him for dead.

The evilness of the CCP is extensive and I really fear for my friends in China. I wish they could have their eyes opened but sadly, most of them are indoctrinated.  Only a handful that have lived abroad can see what is happening but they are powerless. Any hint of dissent and you are imprisoned or 'disappear'.

I don't know what the future holds for them, but at the moment I only see bad stuff and my heart bleeds for them. The new (or not so new) National Credit System is in my opinion, one of the final nails in the coffin for the common Chinese people.
Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • CO2
  • The Legend

    • 4369

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
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Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2019, 07:41:49 am »
A word of caution, be careful what you say to people there even in private, the CCP has many, many seemly innocent people working for them.

The joys of fauxtherhood


  • SanderB
  • Super Waygook

    • 408

    • June 02, 2018, 06:25:54 pm
    • Gouda cheese Be Best cheese
Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2019, 08:45:45 am »
A friend of mine teaches in Shanghai and she said it was okay except for the air and the spitting? The air I get but what is so horrible about Chinese people spitting? Some old Koreans do it, too. Never really bothered me much. And I have  had North African students who would spit non-stop at the school yard, kinda their 'thang'. Acting all gangsta to boot, but with Arab music.   ;D

I'm wondering are you guys bothered by the air quality any at all?
Fiat voluntas tua- All that you want is allowed


  • kangsheng
  • Adventurer

    • 28

    • November 26, 2017, 01:02:06 am
    • Yongin
Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #28 on: February 19, 2019, 08:34:56 pm »
Enjoyed the OP and comments from confusedsafferinkorea.


  • AWVM_HXE
  • Adventurer

    • 45

    • June 15, 2016, 06:07:37 pm
    • Asia-Pacific Region
Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #29 on: February 19, 2019, 09:27:22 pm »
OP, that was the lamest, tamest Chinar story ever.

Talk to me when you're at fighting-driveby-bag-snatchers-while-posing-for-a random-person's-video-while-also-avoiding-the-kid-who's-crapping-on-your-shoe-while-also-bribing-a-cop-while-also-getting-an-injection-from-a-rusty-needle level.

Source: my life


  • Oupa Grey
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    • 40

    • January 29, 2019, 10:56:47 am
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Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #30 on: February 20, 2019, 02:20:49 am »
A friend of mine teaches in Shanghai and she said it was okay except for the air and the spitting? The air I get but what is so horrible about Chinese people spitting? Some old Koreans do it, too. Never really bothered me much. And I have  had North African students who would spit non-stop at the school yard, kinda their 'thang'. Acting all gangsta to boot, but with Arab music.   ;D

I'm wondering are you guys bothered by the air quality any at all?

I chose a more rural area to try and escape some of the air quality issues. I'm not the most sensitive to it (people used to complain about air quality and bad smells in Seoul and I was hardly affected), but it's definitely is a problem. I see a lot of foreigners around me getting sick and there have been "foggy' days which lead to a feeling of a cold coming on...and then it magically disappears after the air clears up. It's as good a reason as any for not staying too long. I would say that much more than air quality, it's the food quality that has bothered me. You can't trust sources and food poisoning and the like happens way too often within the relatively small community of foreigners I teach with. For 2 years running there has even a food-related virus outbreak here that has lead to a few quarantined teachers and students (and government people in white coats and masks walking around the neighboring streets doing an inspection).

The spitting...yeah they do it in Korea too but again, China is China, Korea is Korea. I feel like China is way more rough around the edges and has it's own character - when you live here your perceptions change and I think you tolerate more than in Korea, so in some weird way dirtier things are more acceptable...if that makes sense. It's more common for people to spit indoors here I think - like, I can go to a fancy mall selling the worlds most expensive brands, but the bathroom stalls will be full of spit globs, cigarette ash and burns on the TP dispensers. And I've seen people spitting on the subway floor. Things just have an overall more run down dirty feel. BUT the streets in the city are actually quite clean otherwise. At least in Guangzhou I haven't seen any defecation or urinating (as I was expecting before coming here) or piles of trash. It smells sometimes but doesn't necessarily look dirtier than any other big city. 
« Last Edit: February 20, 2019, 02:25:38 am by Oupa Grey »


  • Oupa Grey
  • Adventurer

    • 40

    • January 29, 2019, 10:56:47 am
    more
Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #31 on: February 20, 2019, 02:24:31 am »
OP, that was the lamest, tamest Chinar story ever.

Talk to me when you're at fighting-driveby-bag-snatchers-while-posing-for-a random-person's-video-while-also-avoiding-the-kid-who's-crapping-on-your-shoe-while-also-bribing-a-cop-while-also-getting-an-injection-from-a-rusty-needle level.

Source: my life

Give me a few more days, I just got back.


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • The Legend

    • 4990

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
    more
Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #32 on: February 20, 2019, 05:58:16 am »
OP, that was the lamest, tamest Chinar story ever.

Talk to me when you're at fighting-driveby-bag-snatchers-while-posing-for-a random-person's-video-while-also-avoiding-the-kid-who's-crapping-on-your-shoe-while-also-bribing-a-cop-while-also-getting-an-injection-from-a-rusty-needle level.

Source: my life

Oh no! another of those ............ but, but it is much worse in ....................... people.     >:(
Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • Oupa Grey
  • Adventurer

    • 40

    • January 29, 2019, 10:56:47 am
    more
Re: A story for you, to celebrate 120 days left and counting.
« Reply #33 on: March 17, 2019, 12:12:43 am »
An added story for you, to celebrate +-90 days left and counting

Now and again I take a trip into Guangzhou to give myself a reminder of why I like living in my rural campus bubble (especially since life is good when the semester is underway and I get to interact with my students every day).

There is a big park near where the shuttle drops teachers off in the middle of the city - I've stopped in the bathroom in that park a few times, 5 to be exact, since there isn't anything else anywhere near. A little dark and cramped - but not as gross as usual public bathrooms. How do I know it's been 5 times? Because every time has been odd and somewhat creepy - so it makes it easy to remember.

When I go to the urinal, Chinese men walk up next to me (and this place it's cramped - it literally feels shoulder to shoulder) and bend over and stare at what I got going on. Blatantly. I will turn and stare at them in the face...it's uncomfortably close, and sometimes ask..."WTF man?" and they look forward (one just looked back) and then immediately crane over and look down at my penis again as I start looking away. I thought it was just an odd creeper the first time, but the second time it happened with the person to my side and someone walked up behind me and tried to look over my shoulder the whole time I was peeing as well. Five times in there - it has happened every. single. time. People have followed me into the bathroom when they see me entering. Today I even found that there was a second bathroom in the park so gave it a try because there was an isolated urinal, on a separate wall to the others. A guy followed me, stood next to me fiddling with his zip (with no urinal anywhere - he was just facing open air - but I don't know...felt the need to pretend he was standing there to start peeing or something?) and tried to catch a peek for the whole "show". It's violating, creepy behavior and has happened every time. Keep in mind this is a Tier 1 city.

A while ago a group of us (foreign teachers) went on a cruise on the river here as a college semester event type of thing. We stood in a courtyard in front of the ticketing building and a group of 30 people+ made a circle around us and all starting pointing, filming, snapping pics, laughing - like they're watching zoo animals or something. Half of them were sweaty, fat dudes with their shirts off. They started walking among us and trying to take close up shots - one guy put his arm on one of the female teachers I was with to take a selfie and I pushed his arm off and said "no no no - no touching" and him and some of the ones closer by just repeated and laughed over and over "hahaha, no touch, no touch - no no no" while he kept trying - and at the same time I'm telling them not to - there are people behind us trying to pose so others can take pics. Tier 1 city.

Another not so exciting story BUT just a small slice of what you are sometimes faced with here. Since it's a Korean mainly board and people are usually considering moving From there to here - I will add the comparison: I have never once had this type of thing happen to me in any part of Korea, ever. Racist people being shitty, people that seem a little nuts - yeah, there have been moments, but never something that feels creepy. And I've travelled to so many corners of that country. I've also spent a fair amount of time in jjimjaelbangs over the years, hanging with the naked addjossis and what not as I got a cheap nights accommodation - and not once did I get the feeling that they were creepy as f&^k and it was blowing their minds to catch a glimpse of a white guys penis.

This is part of my general experience - make of it what you will.

Roughly 90 days left and counting.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2019, 01:09:03 pm by Oupa Grey »


Re: An added story for you, to celebrate +-90 days left and counting.
« Reply #34 on: March 17, 2019, 10:52:19 am »
Cue someone stepping in to report how in China, anyone can walk into a $5k per month job, get a lavishly appointed apartment for free, breathe clean air, walk on unlittered, spit-free streets and live amongst the kindest, most outgoing people on the planet, most of whom speak excellent English.


  I have taught in China before as well as Korea. I am mainly going to focus on what Andyman said today about pay and conditions. There is work, but the bureaucracy involved in getting the correct Chinese visa-the Z-Visa is rigorous. If you go on a tourist visa, you risk being exploited or getting caught. You cannot just walk into a job.
   I worked in Beijing, where I was given a nice apartment in the centre of the city. I taught at a small college which trained people to work in top class hotels, so appearance, and sartorial elegance were part of the job description. The students would be dealing with rich people in their future work.
   However, I liked it for a while. It was reasonably easy to save money, plus we got to go to Thailand for a month on holiday! I had to leave home at 7 to catch the bus for work. The school provided the bus. Yet I managed fine, in Beijing, and at times, I was amazed to find that the north wind had blown all the smog out of the sky.
   Conditions of the job weren't at all bad. Surprisingly, almost nobody wanted to stay on another year.
   At my other job in Beijing, there was no apartment, and no school bus. There was a longer commute, an earlier start, and life was just more inconvenient generally. I was aware of so much more noise. I had to pay 4 months of rent to move into a shared apartment, well before my first salary payment, and I had to also commute to the centre of Beijing for certain events run by the recruiter that employed us.
   This required me to commute over an hour to get there, during a busy week. I had 24 teaching hours, but it seemed harder than 24 teaching hours at a hagwon in Seongnam, Korea, and I am guessing it's because I was to be at work by 7:30 a.m. On the other hand, the kids absolutely loved me. When I left, I was festooned with thank you notes, cards, posters and testimonials of my successful teaching. The kids really felt they had learned something. And while I would be disinclined to go back to that job, under those conditions, knowing that I was successful, and that I was appreciated by the students would encourage me to try. However, I was now getting angry and bitter at life outside school. I, who had seemed to be immune to stress in China for a long while, was now fed up with the relentless inconvenience.
   What I also noticed was that to get the flight money that was promised to me, I had to provide rigorous proof that I had actually bought the ticket. In the previous job, I was given the average cost of a flight to the UK. At the public school, however, I had to provide proof (in Chinese) that I had bought the ticket and been issued with a voucher, and, I had to go to the recruiter's office.
   I was sick of China, and so glad to get a job in Korea and meet my friends there again.


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • The Legend

    • 4990

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu Province, Taiwan
    more
Re: An added story for you, to celebrate +-90 days left and counting.
« Reply #36 on: March 18, 2019, 05:42:33 am »
Cue someone stepping in to report how in China, anyone can walk into a $5k per month job, get a lavishly appointed apartment for free, breathe clean air, walk on unlittered, spit-free streets and live amongst the kindest, most outgoing people on the planet, most of whom speak excellent English.

Andyman you come across as rather cynical. My friend there did in fact walk into a job of 5K plus in Shanghai and I was making 3,600,000 won without even trying, I could have made more but I valued my time more. In some cities they fall all over you to get you to do extra hours.

I had a great apartment, everything provided for free, free bus to and from my college, free utilities etc. The only expense I had was my own food. My city was spotless, in fact they went overboard in cleaning the streets. I found spitting less prevalent too. The students were amazing as were many of the business owners around my apartment, I often got freebies from them. The general public treated me very well and wherever I went I was asked to hold babies and have a picture with them.

Air pollution - ranged from horrific to okay, depending on the time of year. Level of English, like all ESL positions, their ability ranged from near native speaker to a few basic words.

China is far from perfect, but given the choice between Korea and where I taught, I would go to China in a heartbeat except for one thing, the CCP. That makes China a dubious choice now especially if you are Canadian. The man in the street is not going to give you a hard time, it is the CCP that will rain on your parade.  That being said, I would still be there had they not changed the visa rules which made it impossible to for me to stay. As I said in a previous comment, I am in Taiwan now and it is awesome. As I said too previously, Taiwan is what China would be without the CCP.

I want to add that pollution down south like cities such as Xiamen is not a problem. So if you head to China try for one of those kind of cities.

China is a huge country with a huge population so you are going to get stories that range from horror to ones of great delight just the same as in Korea. There are those who have delightful schools and apartments and their are those who have horror stories to tell.

My advice is if you want to go to China to teach, nothing wrong with that, it can be a great experience BUT, do your homework really well and NEVER  go there without having a Z visa first.

Andyman, not sure why you are so cynical, everyone who commented on this thread was very objective. It is up to the individual as to where they would like to teach and I think your comment was uncalled for to be honest.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2019, 08:24:23 am by confusedsafferinkorea »
Everything is not as it seems.

No one owes you anything.... get over it.

There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


Sorry, I didn't mean to cause offense. I wasn't insulting anyone's choice to teach in China. I was commenting on the tendency for mysterious China boosters (on this board and elsewhere) to follow negative comments / strange stories about China with implausibly utopian descriptions about teaching there. I've noticed that many of those posters don't contribute anything else, and sometimes their comments have a copy-and-paste quality, which makes me think they're recruiters in not-very-effective-disguise.

I actually considered teaching at Xiamen University a couple years ago but the package wasn't really anything superior to what I was getting in Korea (weather excluded, and maybe the food?), and there were enough drawbacks that I didn't really consider it for long. Then again, my experience in Korea has been different from a lot of people's. I had a nice 2-bedroom apartment provided my first year (it was a couple position that I did with my wife, hence the larger accommodation). Subsequently, I've lived in private rentals of my own choosing either completely covered or about 2/3 covered by the housing subsidy I get through work. I currently live in the neighborhood in Seoul that was my top choice when I was looking for a new place, about 5 minutes walk to a subway station which has a connection to the airport line. I also teach only 12 hours a week. So I get that China is might be a lifestyle upgrade for some people, but I don't think it would be for me. I'm not bragging about any of this - I do think it's important to mention that not every teacher in Korea is doing 35 hours of hagwon hell and living in a moldy box with terrible plumbing, as many China boosters seem to imply.


Sorry, I didn't mean to cause offense. I wasn't insulting anyone's choice to teach in China. I was commenting on the tendency for mysterious China boosters (on this board and elsewhere) to follow negative comments / strange stories about China with implausibly utopian descriptions about teaching there. I've noticed that many of those posters don't contribute anything else, and sometimes their comments have a copy-and-paste quality, which makes me think they're recruiters in not-very-effective-disguise.

I actually considered teaching at Xiamen University a couple years ago but the package wasn't really anything superior to what I was getting in Korea (weather excluded, and maybe the food?), and there were enough drawbacks that I didn't really consider it for long. Then again, my experience in Korea has been different from a lot of people's. I had a nice 2-bedroom apartment provided my first year (it was a couple position that I did with my wife, hence the larger accommodation). Subsequently, I've lived in private rentals of my own choosing either completely covered or about 2/3 covered by the housing subsidy I get through work. I currently live in the neighborhood in Seoul that was my top choice when I was looking for a new place, about 5 minutes walk to a subway station which has a connection to the airport line. I also teach only 12 hours a week. So I get that China is might be a lifestyle upgrade for some people, but I don't think it would be for me. I'm not bragging about any of this - I do think it's important to mention that not every teacher in Korea is doing 35 hours of hagwon hell and living in a moldy box with terrible plumbing, as many China boosters seem to imply.

I'd be pretty sceptical about anywhere providing housing allowance high enough to even get 2/3 of a decent place in Seoul. The exceptions would be the BC and Gagnam moe which offer around 900,000, the former offers 15 mil deposit.  Most unis offer 4-500,000 with no deposit.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2019, 10:10:59 am by eggieguffer »


Mine gives 600,000, and I got a pretty good deal on the apartment - new building, first time landlord living two floors below. She and her husband occupy the largest unit, her daughter's got a medium-sized one between us, and we're on the top in the smallest unit. It's what Koreans call a 1.5 room, I think - one separate bedroom, plus conjoined living room + kitchen. I think she wanted to get someone in as soon as possible, and also wanted a couple instead of a single person, and we happened to be in the right place at the right time to take advantage of the situation.

But we did need a 10mil deposit, which obviously isn't likely to work for new arrivals to Korea.

The previous place wasn't in Seoul: 500,000 subsidy, 485,000 rent, 5 mil deposit.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2019, 11:00:35 am by Andyman »