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  • oglop
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1841

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Korean teachers demand removal of native English speakers
« Reply #60 on: January 29, 2019, 06:37:31 pm »
i've been to training days before with my co-teacher, about "how to teach with your co-teacher". but we just went to another school and watched a native teacher give a demo class, which was actually very embarrassing, because the native teacher lead the whole class, while the korean teacher sat at the back doing nothing

I wonder what the KTU think of native teachers leading classes while Korean teachers do nothing (which seems quite common).
i know mine thought the whole thing was a waste of time, as she said "ugh, let's just sneak off and go home", but she was one of the competent ones who knew how to teach


Re: Korean teachers demand removal of native English speakers
« Reply #61 on: January 29, 2019, 09:15:09 pm »
I've been away from Korea a long time so my thoughts should be considered in that light.

When I was working there, there seemed to be  a constant conflict between city hall, the education office and

the school itself.   Each one trying to enforce its directives and or decisions over the others and quite often,

very contradictory to each other.    Then there is the teacher's union/unions to add to the mix; you get

a very confused and dysfunctional result.   


At the local level, the ideas of each principal and or co-teacher were usually what got done in the school,

regardless of what the education office or city hall had to say. 


When you had a good relationship with your co-teacher, things went a lot smoother.

Some co-teachers were seemingly impossible to work with and went out of their way to make things

difficult. 

 Some NET's were not well suited to the job, that is true.   But the directives for that job were never really made clear.  What the education office wanted was contrary to what the principal wanted and different again to what
city hall wanted.

 Each situation is  different, so it's impossible to generalize other than,

 the whole English education program leaves a lot to be desired.

I've said it before, I think the whole EPIK adventure was set up to fail.   

It seems that schools want the money they get to host a NET, but they don't want the NET, so
they will go through all kinds of face saving rituals to give the appearance of compliance to gov't
regulations but they then will go to great lengths to ensure that the NETs they hire will have no
real educational value.   

I know there are schools where the NETs are valued and do benefit their students, but I would guess
that they are the exception rather than the norm.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2019, 09:28:50 pm by some waygug-in »


  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1467

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
Re: Korean teachers demand removal of native English speakers
« Reply #62 on: January 30, 2019, 09:42:45 pm »
now you bust me down to the English Dept.
Unless you're in an Elementary school, teachers don't get busted down to the English Department. They are in the department that they are trained to teach.


Re: Korean teachers demand removal of native English speakers
« Reply #63 on: January 30, 2019, 10:16:53 pm »
Forgive my ignorance, but aren't most of NET's working in elementary schools now?

I thought most of the middle and high school positions for NET's were eliminated over the past 2 or 3

years.


Re: Korean teachers demand removal of native English speakers
« Reply #64 on: January 31, 2019, 09:57:53 am »
"How's your Hangeul?"
"Geugo, mashgetda, yogiyo."
"You learn that shit brother, that shit'll get you killed!"
PLot Twist: MayorHaggar the English teacher gets called into the Principal's office to explain himself to Mayor Haggar, the Mayor of Haggar.

"There's only room enough in this town for ONE Mayor Haggar, and that's me."
"Oh yeah, well we'll just have to see about that..." *lights cigarette and blows smoke in Mayor's face.*


  • oglop
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1841

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Korean teachers demand removal of native English speakers
« Reply #65 on: January 31, 2019, 11:04:47 am »
Forgive my ignorance, but aren't most of NET's working in elementary schools now?

I thought most of the middle and high school positions for NET's were eliminated over the past 2 or 3

years.
Yes, exactly. At the high school I worked at, the Korean English teachers were competent. Elementary schools, generally speaking, absolutely not.

The native teacher at my school told me nobody wants to work with her, and the principal is having a tough time trying to find her a coteacher. I felt the same at my old school too.

Elementary schools treat native teachers more like a headache than a resource


Re: Korean teachers demand removal of native English speakers
« Reply #66 on: January 31, 2019, 11:24:42 am »
Forgive my ignorance, but aren't most of NET's working in elementary schools now?

I thought most of the middle and high school positions for NET's were eliminated over the past 2 or 3

years.
Yes, exactly. At the high school I worked at, the Korean English teachers were competent. Elementary schools, generally speaking, absolutely not.

The native teacher at my school told me nobody wants to work with her, and the principal is having a tough time trying to find her a coteacher. I felt the same at my old school too.

Elementary schools treat native teachers more like a headache than a resource


At my school there are 2 teachers who have done the 3 month exchange program in western English speaking countries in the last 2 yrs. One of them said she asked the VP to be my CoT but he refused. He also refused her to be part of the English camp and had teachers who could hardly speak English instead. She is young so I assume that is the reason. Also a really good HR teacher so I assume thats why they wanted to keep her as a HR.

Who knows who I will get as the new CoT... fingers crossed!


Re: Korean teachers demand removal of native English speakers
« Reply #67 on: February 03, 2019, 09:48:34 am »
I have seen these rumblings...in fact, most of live them on a daily basis, even in the hagwon (oh..for the person that seemed so confused about my misspelling of "hagwon", I am sorry).  I am surprised that the "certified" teachers have not opined and started taking the side of the narrative of discontent among the KTU.  I only scanned the replies, so perhaps I missed one or two? 

That article, if overseen by a competent editor, should not have been allowed to be published.  It was written by an overgrown child, that had no solid questions regarding...

1.  Facts
2.  Working culture
3.  Training and/or assigned mentors
4.  A detailed plan for success
5.  Detailed challenges listed by either the KTU or the foreign teachers themselves
6  An obvious nod to a useless way of learning a foreign language
7.  Challenges regarding cultural conflict and what can be done to overcome such things
8.  The motives behind the KTU vs the fact that Korea already has some strict requirements for foreign teachers
9.  Questions  regarding the channels of communication
10.  An acknowledgement from the KTU, regarding its already biased notions (and Korea in general) regarding foreigners


Am I missing anything?