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  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1266

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #80 on: December 10, 2018, 09:22:27 am »
Another reason why I stopped using English names when I teach here in Korea is because my first year at my second public school I used to talk to my co-teacher about my students and she could never keep up. 

Me:"CoT I need to talk to you about Alex and his behavior in my class." 
CoT: Who's Alex? :huh: :huh:
Me:  지후
CoT: Oh okay!
Me: I also need to talk to you about Emma.
CoT:  Who's Emma?  :huh: :huh: :huh: :huh:
Me: 예림

 :rolleyes: :rolleyes:  From that point on I told my students I would no longer call them by their English names and I need to learn their Korean names in order to communicate with my co-teacher.  It's been a couple of years now and I have yet to use English names with any of the two schools I work at.   

And not for nothing but I'm sure most of us waygs do have Korean names that we used if we ever attended Korean Language schools.  I used both my birth name and my Korean name.  My Korean teachers always got a kick out of seeing that I had a Korean name but in reality she just called me by my government name  :afro:

Oh going back to my "Indian" student, I never gave that student an English name.  They simply went by their birth name but with it Hangulized. 

I'm curious?  Being that Korea is becoming more globlized; for some of you on Team English Name, let's say you had a non-Korean kid in your class.  Are you going to give them an English name just because your entire class was given English names?  Just want your thoughts on that.  So far, some of my friends who do have foreign students in their class (most times they tend to be students from the Indus region India, Pakistan, etc) tend to just stick with their given names despite the fact that their hakwon presses for an all English name formation.

I don't do English names personally. In my first year. They were just giving me names like: Harry potter; E-mart; BTS; Etc.
I was also at big schools, and I think I only managed to learn 3 - 5 names that year. But, if I done English names, it would be all or nothing.
Although, if a student asked me to call them by an English name, I'd be happy to. Or, if I was doing English names, and a few students didn't want to, I'd try use their Korean names.

Currently, I'm at small rural schools, and I know all the students by their Korean names at 2/3 of my schools. At the 3rd, I know a few students names but, that school is hard for me to learn the students names at. A lot of highly disruptive students are there (thanks former principal who accepting soccer students >.>) and they don't even listen to any of the Korean teachers at the best of times, so it can be hard to actually try talk to them. Whenever you talk to them in English, they just answer with "play soccer"; if they even answer you at all. >.<

I'm dreading going there post-exams this Wednesday >.<
« Last Edit: December 10, 2018, 09:34:16 am by Kayos »


Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #81 on: December 10, 2018, 09:28:03 am »
Another reason why I stopped using English names when I teach here in Korea is because my first year at my second public school I used to talk to my co-teacher about my students and she could never keep up. 

Me:"CoT I need to talk to you about Alex and his behavior in my class." 
CoT: Who's Alex? :huh: :huh:
Me:  지후
CoT: Oh okay!
Me: I also need to talk to you about Emma.
CoT:  Who's Emma?  :huh: :huh: :huh: :huh:
Me: 예림

 :rolleyes: :rolleyes:  From that point on I told my students I would no longer call them by their English names and I need to learn their Korean names in order to communicate with my co-teacher.  It's been a couple of years now and I have yet to use English names with any of the two schools I work at.   

And not for nothing but I'm sure most of us waygs do have Korean names that we used if we ever attended Korean Language schools.  I used both my birth name and my Korean name.  My Korean teachers always got a kick out of seeing that I had a Korean name but in reality she just called me by my government name  :afro:

Oh going back to my "Indian" student, I never gave that student an English name.  They simply went by their birth name but with it Hangulized. 

I'm curious?  Being that Korea is becoming more globlized; for some of you on Team English Name, let's say you had a non-Korean kid in your class.  Are you going to give them an English name just because your entire class was given English names?  Just want your thoughts on that.  So far, some of my friends who do have foreign students in their class (most times they tend to be students from the Indus region India, Pakistan, etc) tend to just stick with their given names despite the fact that their hakwon presses for an all English name formation.

I don't do English names personally. In my first year. They were just giving me names like: Harry potter; E-mart; BTS; Etc.
I was also at big schools, and I think I only managed to learn 3 - 5 names that year. But, if I done English names, it would be all or nothing.

Currently, I'm at small rural schools, and I know all the students by their Korean names at 2/3 of my schools. At the 3rd, I know a few students names but, that school is hard for me to learn the students names at. A lot of highly disruptive students are there (thanks former principal who accepting soccer students >.>) and they don't even listen to any of the Korean teachers at the best of times, so it can be hard to actually try talk to them. Whenever you talk to them in English, they just answer with "play soccer"; if they even answer you at all. >.<

I'm dreading going there post-exams this Wednesday >.<

Show them a clip of Song Heung Min being interviewed on Match of the Day and  say 'look you can play soccer and speak English!"


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1266

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #82 on: December 10, 2018, 09:35:36 am »
Another reason why I stopped using English names when I teach here in Korea is because my first year at my second public school I used to talk to my co-teacher about my students and she could never keep up. 

Me:"CoT I need to talk to you about Alex and his behavior in my class." 
CoT: Who's Alex? :huh: :huh:
Me:  지후
CoT: Oh okay!
Me: I also need to talk to you about Emma.
CoT:  Who's Emma?  :huh: :huh: :huh: :huh:
Me: 예림

 :rolleyes: :rolleyes:  From that point on I told my students I would no longer call them by their English names and I need to learn their Korean names in order to communicate with my co-teacher.  It's been a couple of years now and I have yet to use English names with any of the two schools I work at.   

And not for nothing but I'm sure most of us waygs do have Korean names that we used if we ever attended Korean Language schools.  I used both my birth name and my Korean name.  My Korean teachers always got a kick out of seeing that I had a Korean name but in reality she just called me by my government name  :afro:

Oh going back to my "Indian" student, I never gave that student an English name.  They simply went by their birth name but with it Hangulized. 

I'm curious?  Being that Korea is becoming more globlized; for some of you on Team English Name, let's say you had a non-Korean kid in your class.  Are you going to give them an English name just because your entire class was given English names?  Just want your thoughts on that.  So far, some of my friends who do have foreign students in their class (most times they tend to be students from the Indus region India, Pakistan, etc) tend to just stick with their given names despite the fact that their hakwon presses for an all English name formation.

I don't do English names personally. In my first year. They were just giving me names like: Harry potter; E-mart; BTS; Etc.
I was also at big schools, and I think I only managed to learn 3 - 5 names that year. But, if I done English names, it would be all or nothing.

Currently, I'm at small rural schools, and I know all the students by their Korean names at 2/3 of my schools. At the 3rd, I know a few students names but, that school is hard for me to learn the students names at. A lot of highly disruptive students are there (thanks former principal who accepting soccer students >.>) and they don't even listen to any of the Korean teachers at the best of times, so it can be hard to actually try talk to them. Whenever you talk to them in English, they just answer with "play soccer"; if they even answer you at all. >.<

I'm dreading going there post-exams this Wednesday >.<

Show them a clip of Song Heung Min being interviewed on Match of the Day and  say 'look you can play soccer and speak English!"

My co-T at that school: "No videos, music, games, movies, fun in your class, because the students need a break from those things." :'( <- this is for the after exam period, which starts this week.
Might be a good idea for next year if the soccer students are still there, and I'm still at that school though, thanks! :D


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1266

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #83 on: December 10, 2018, 09:44:47 am »
...

So is this a thing other people have experienced? Almost as if the students have learnt not to respect the foreign teacher as much? As if they don’t need to take use or our lessons as seriously?

Just to reply to the original discussion, i wll say yeah your thoughts are probably right. While bad students are bad to any teacher who is “weak” (lol for lack of a better word), englisht nets are naturally seen as “fun free time” b/c well...that’s what they’re first introduced to in elementary school so i don’t really blame them.

I teach at a middle school and i quickly learned that i have to put discipline first and mimic korean classroom mgmt. (ie in the beginning of the class, the class president leads the students to greet me like they would to a normal korean teacher. If they’re late or keep chatting they get penalty points and i make them stand in the back. If the class is being so rambunctuous before the lesson even begins i make everyone put their head down and scold them.)

That being said, i don’t expect perfection and ya kinda learn when to yell/scold/express your disappointment and when to just drop it and move on. But that’s just me.

But ive heard horrible horror stories of elementary school students.../shivers.../whispers: good luck w/ that.. :P

What if there is no class presidents in your school. :O
None of mine do, now.
In my first year though, all my schools did. :p


  • Mr C
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1650

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #84 on: December 10, 2018, 09:47:13 am »
Well said Piggydee and that article makes the point.

As I've said, I have talked about "shoe on the other foot" and that's my angle here.

If the Chinese were the dominant power and running things in Chinese and in schools in America, all kids had to study Chinese and their Chinese teacher was giving them Chinese names and telling my son he had to have a Chinese name and that was his name in the class OR ELSE, I'd tell that Chinese teacher to take his Chinese name and shove it up his Chinese ass and I'd hope my son would be there to watch me say it.

His grades may suffer, but at least he'd have respect for himself and his father.

Not singling out the Chinese here, substitute with Russian or French or Korean or Portuguese etc. etc.

But the issue is, this NEVER happens. Or if it does it's done by some absolute weirdo. It is not the norm. And I doubt it ever has been. I've worked in esl since 2002 in 8 different countries, I've never had a co-worker who did this. Give out English names? Sure. Forced them upon kids and punish them for not using them? Never, ever, in 16 years.

If I was learning Chinese I would not be surprised if they gave me a Chinese name to use in class. It happened in Russian class and Maori class when I was at school.

Please, leave the dude his strawmen, they're all he has!


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2551

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #85 on: December 10, 2018, 09:57:04 am »

I don't do English names personally. In my first year. They were just giving me names like: Harry potter; E-mart; BTS; Etc.
I was also at big schools, and I think I only managed to learn 3 - 5 names that year. But, if I done English names, it would be all or nothing.
Although, if a student asked me to call them by an English name, I'd be happy to. Or, if I was doing English names, and a few students didn't want to, I'd try use their Korean names.

Currently, I'm at small rural schools, and I know all the students by their Korean names at 2/3 of my schools. At the 3rd, I know a few students names but, that school is hard for me to learn the students names at. A lot of highly disruptive students are there (thanks former principal who accepting soccer students >.>) and they don't even listen to any of the Korean teachers at the best of times, so it can be hard to actually try talk to them. Whenever you talk to them in English, they just answer with "play soccer"; if they even answer you at all. >.<

I'm dreading going there post-exams this Wednesday >.<

Yeah at my main school I know all 45 of the students' Korean names. At my travel school which has 300 plus student I only teach 5/6 grade and I only see them on Tuesdays and Fridays.  It's only the bad students names I know because I'm constantly getting after them.  The good students I have to consult their name tags on their desk to remember their Korean names.   And yeah I dead the whole "English Names" practice in this country when I was getting stupid a** names like "Supermarket, APink, Really, Lizard, Hulk, and Mine craft."  Especially when they wanted to change their name every 2 weeks or so.  :rolleyes: :rolleyes:  GIRL BYE WITH THAT GARBAGE!   


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1266

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #86 on: December 10, 2018, 10:02:14 am »

I don't do English names personally. In my first year. They were just giving me names like: Harry potter; E-mart; BTS; Etc.
I was also at big schools, and I think I only managed to learn 3 - 5 names that year. But, if I done English names, it would be all or nothing.
Although, if a student asked me to call them by an English name, I'd be happy to. Or, if I was doing English names, and a few students didn't want to, I'd try use their Korean names.

Currently, I'm at small rural schools, and I know all the students by their Korean names at 2/3 of my schools. At the 3rd, I know a few students names but, that school is hard for me to learn the students names at. A lot of highly disruptive students are there (thanks former principal who accepting soccer students >.>) and they don't even listen to any of the Korean teachers at the best of times, so it can be hard to actually try talk to them. Whenever you talk to them in English, they just answer with "play soccer"; if they even answer you at all. >.<

I'm dreading going there post-exams this Wednesday >.<

Yeah at my main school I know all 45 of the students' Korean names. At my travel school which has 300 plus student I only teach 5/6 grade and I only see them on Tuesdays and Fridays.  It's only the bad students names I know because I'm constantly getting after them.  The good students I have to consult their name tags on their desk to remember their Korean names.   And yeah I dead the whole "English Names" practice in this country when I was getting stupid a** names like "Supermarket, APink, Really, Lizard, Hulk, and Mine craft."  Especially when they wanted to change their name every 2 weeks or so.  :rolleyes: :rolleyes:  GIRL BYE WITH THAT GARBAGE!

I actually find it easier to learn the names of the good students haha.
I know, usually you learn the bad students names first, because you need to get onto them about things a lot more; But usually, the good students will talk with me more, so I tend to learn theirs easier haha.
I have about 40~ students at the school I don't know everyone's names haha.
My other schools have 15 and 25 students, so it's a lot easier, but usually takes me around a month or so haha


Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #87 on: December 10, 2018, 10:08:52 am »
That's not what happens. The management ask the FT's to give English names to the students to make it seem like an english community.
That can certainly happen, yes. That's not every case however. I specifically said that there were other possibilities that I did not specify that are legitimate reasons for giving names. "Because my boss says so" is a pretty good one.

Quote
The other point you don't get is that traditionally Koreans use their real names sparingly and reverentially. Reserved for significant social and special events. Their full names are too precious to be used in a relaxed social setting
Right, but school is not a relaxed social setting (and I'm not sure how accurate your claim is. It certainly hasn't registered that way to me, but then I might not be 100% right. Other opinions?)

Please, leave the dude his strawmen, they're all he has!
Aside from the dude saying it was a common practice in other language classes, and aside from the fact that some teachers have mentioned them doing it and the attitudes they have encountered, yeah it's a total strawman!


Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #88 on: December 10, 2018, 11:24:53 am »
...

So is this a thing other people have experienced? Almost as if the students have learnt not to respect the foreign teacher as much? As if they don’t need to take use or our lessons as seriously?
...
I teach at a middle school and i quickly learned that i have to put discipline first and mimic korean classroom mgmt. (ie in the beginning of the class, the class president leads the students to greet me like they would to a normal korean teacher. If they’re late or keep chatting they get penalty points and i make them stand in the back. If the class is being so rambunctuous before the lesson even begins i make everyone put their head down and scold them.)
...
What if there is no class presidents in your school. :O
None of mine do, now.
In my first year though, all my schools did. :p
ooh! so sometimes our class president is out so i assign someone that roll as "the english president".
someone who is good at screaming over everyone else ;P


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1266

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #89 on: December 10, 2018, 12:20:58 pm »
...

So is this a thing other people have experienced? Almost as if the students have learnt not to respect the foreign teacher as much? As if they don’t need to take use or our lessons as seriously?
...
I teach at a middle school and i quickly learned that i have to put discipline first and mimic korean classroom mgmt. (ie in the beginning of the class, the class president leads the students to greet me like they would to a normal korean teacher. If they’re late or keep chatting they get penalty points and i make them stand in the back. If the class is being so rambunctuous before the lesson even begins i make everyone put their head down and scold them.)
...
What if there is no class presidents in your school. :O
None of mine do, now.
In my first year though, all my schools did. :p
ooh! so sometimes our class president is out so i assign someone that roll as "the english president".
someone who is good at screaming over everyone else ;P

Ahh nice :P
At my current schools, I don't need to worry about that for 2/3 of them.
But at my 3rd school, the bad kids outweigh the good ones by a lot, and they don't even listen to the korean teachers :(


  • CO2
  • The Legend

    • 4452

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
    more
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #90 on: December 10, 2018, 12:52:31 pm »
And yeah I dead the whole "English Names" practice in this country when I was getting stupid a** names like "Supermarket, APink, Really, Lizard, Hulk, and Mine craft." 

 :smiley: Teacher, my name is *shows me nametag* Bolstik.

 :police: Bowl Stick?

 :smiley: No, Ballistic.

 :police: What?? Ballistic? Do you even know what that means?

 :smiley: No.

 :police: It's the scientific study of guns and bullets.

 :smiley: Coooooooolllllllllllllllllllllll.

----------------

 :-* Teacher, my English name is Sleepground.

 :police: What does that even mean?????

 :-* Minecrapped.

 :police: Of course it is.
The joys of fauxtherhood


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2551

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #91 on: December 10, 2018, 01:15:01 pm »
I'm glad I got out of the name game.  Ugh wait until Fortnite starts becoming a thing here.  Yep not having it!


  • Kayos
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1266

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #92 on: December 10, 2018, 02:21:49 pm »
I'm glad I got out of the name game.  Ugh wait until Fortnite starts becoming a thing here.  Yep not having it!

Pretty sure it's already a thing here. :p


Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #93 on: December 10, 2018, 02:50:28 pm »
I'm glad I got out of the name game.  Ugh wait until Fortnite starts becoming a thing here.  Yep not having it!

Teaching time phrases, I asked my students last week:

What do you call a period of 2 weeks?

BLANK FACES

OK, i will give you a clue, it is the same as one of the most popular computer games in the world:

LOL - no

Wow - no

Overwatch - no

Super Mario Brothers - Really?

So i told the: 2 weeks is a fortnight

Class: Ahhhhhhhhh

Cue student: It's not a world popular game, Koreans don't play it.

me: Is Korea the world? Maybe people play it in other countries...

Student:.......


  • oglop
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1962

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #94 on: December 10, 2018, 03:07:02 pm »
i have seen so many fortnite adverts on tv in korea. even on the sides of buses. give it a few weeks. can't wait til all the kids keep doing those ****** fortnite dances (pls kill me if this happens)


  • Piggydee
  • The Legend

    • 2551

    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
    • South Korea
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #95 on: December 10, 2018, 03:29:10 pm »
I'm glad I got out of the name game.  Ugh wait until Fortnite starts becoming a thing here.  Yep not having it!

It's not a world popular game, Koreans don't play it.

me: Is Korea the world? Maybe people play it in other countries...

Student:.......

Yeah I tried to be the "hip cool teacher" by bringing up Forenite a month ago and my kids looked at me with blank stares.   :rolleyes:


  • Cyanea
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1072

    • September 04, 2016, 01:48:24 pm
    • Las Vegas
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #96 on: December 10, 2018, 05:54:42 pm »
Right, but school is not a relaxed social setting (and I'm not sure how accurate your claim is. It certainly hasn't registered that way to me, but then I might not be 100% right.

Let me quote from "Korean Patterns" by Paul S Crane, Royal Asiatic Society, 1999:

Quote
"The use of names in Korea has an entirely different connotation from that in most western countries, especially in America. To the Confucian, using a name is presumptuous and impolite. A name is something to be honored and respected, and should not be used casually. The name, being written or spoken, has its own mystique.

A name is a person's personal property. To call someone directly by his name is an affront to his person in most social circumstances. When a westerner uses a Korean's name to his face, watch for the slight wince around the eyes. it is almost always there. name-dropping is not the way to win friends and influence people in Korea.

One of the most common mistakes Westerners make with koreans is the frequent use of names in conversation. Frequent use of names merely indicates poor breeding to a Korean, and shows that the one using the names so freely has no sensibilities about a person's private property. The misuse of names is often pointed to by Koreans as evidence of the crude nature of Westerners: how barbaric they are in using names in the most embarrassing and disgraceful manner. many Koreans work and live next to each other for years without ever knowing their full names.

Given names are seldom used except in the family, between classmates, or between very intimate friends who have agreed to first-name eachother as a sign of special affection. Childhood acquintances also first-name eachother. Even so, names are used much less than in a western family. A mother will not call her grown daughter by her first name in the presence of visitors. many dislike being first-named by foreigners. The casual American custom of encouraging children to call adult family friends by their first name is especially offensive. The British are less apt to make this blunder".

I don't want to go on because its a long passage and there are many more historic and cultural connotations to full names that I won't go into.

But yeah, it explains why when you get a new Korean co-worker and are reaching around for what to call them they will quickly interject with a made-up English name.
Catch my drift?


  • CO2
  • The Legend

    • 4452

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
    more
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #97 on: December 10, 2018, 10:42:13 pm »
Cyanea:

I've mentioned this before on waygook, but it blows my mind that my friends and girlfriends here in Korea, 9 times out of ten, didn't know their grandma's names, their uncle's names.

Like, yeah, I get that you would never call your grandma "Hyesook" or whatever, I GET WHY, before someone explains it to me, but to not even know? Like, to literally never have heard it, or even have a pssing knowledge of your grandma's name. To be asked what it is and to draw a blank?

It is soooo bizarre to me. No one at Apple calls Tim Cook, Tim. But you bet your ass everyone bloody person at the company KNOWS WHAT HIS FIRST NAME IS.

Blows my mind. My 33 year old friend texted his mom and asked her when I put him on the spot, it's just so bloody weird.
The joys of fauxtherhood


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 3933

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #98 on: December 11, 2018, 08:17:24 am »
Even if I have their email addresses, my business associates are hard to keep track of.

1) They are all named Kim/Park/Lee/Shin/Ahn/Choi
2) Many corporate email addresses look like dating or gaming site handles (my fave is smile@[company].co.kr)
3) If they work for a western company, then their email is something like Kim.JW@[company].com, but since the personal names are seldom used, I have know idea if this is the lady who introduced herself to me as "Amy" or the gent who goes by "David".


  • Cyanea
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1072

    • September 04, 2016, 01:48:24 pm
    • Las Vegas
Re: Attitude towards foreign teachers
« Reply #99 on: December 11, 2018, 07:47:04 pm »
Cyanea:

I've mentioned this before on waygook, but it blows my mind that my friends and girlfriends here in Korea, 9 times out of ten, didn't know their grandma's names, their uncle's names.

Like, yeah, I get that you would never call your grandma "Hyesook" or whatever, I GET WHY, before someone explains it to me, but to not even know? Like, to literally never have heard it, or even have a pssing knowledge of your grandma's name. To be asked what it is and to draw a blank?

It is soooo bizarre to me. No one at Apple calls Tim Cook, Tim. But you bet your ass everyone bloody person at the company KNOWS WHAT HIS FIRST NAME IS.

Blows my mind. My 33 year old friend texted his mom and asked her when I put him on the spot, it's just so bloody weird.

I think they mostly call senior family members by their titles only, and the actual names are never used.

Europe is still similar in some respects. I mean nobody calls their Grandmother by her first name. She's simply "Gran". At most you might call her "Granny Joyce" or whatever, but even then westerners often probably do not know the full names of senior relatives right up until the day of the funeral.

 


Catch my drift?