Read 1777 times

  • mjc8500
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • August 26, 2018, 05:27:23 am
    • Seoul
Greetings from returning teacher
« on: October 16, 2018, 03:17:26 am »
Hello Waygook.org. Returning teacher here. I taught a number of years in Korea, went back to the States and started teaching here and absolutely hate it. Planning on heading back to Korea as soon as I can.


Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2018, 07:25:47 am »
Hello Waygook.org. Returning teacher here. I taught a number of years in Korea, went back to the States and started teaching here and absolutely hate it. Planning on heading back to Korea as soon as I can.

What made you 'absolutely hate it'?  If you don't mind me asking?

Welcome back [soon] ....


Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2018, 08:04:56 am »
Eeek!! I plan on returning stateside  so I can get my teaching license, but definitely don't want to remain there. what made you hate it? and also, welcome back (soon)!


  • mjc8500
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • August 26, 2018, 05:27:23 am
    • Seoul
Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2018, 08:50:07 am »
Hello Waygook.org. Returning teacher here. I taught a number of years in Korea, went back to the States and started teaching here and absolutely hate it. Planning on heading back to Korea as soon as I can.

What made you 'absolutely hate it'?  If you don't mind me asking?

Welcome back [soon] ....

I really like teaching, but I feel like when it comes to kids in the US, generally speaking, there's no expectation that they have to do well in school. A lot of my students laugh at the idea that going to college is something that they should do. There are obviously economic and social pressures on a lot of these kids, but knowing that and actually dealing with it are two different things. It's common to be shouted at, insulted, or even threatened by students. I had a 12 year old boy bring a very realistic looking toy gun to school last month and he threatened a number of students with it, claiming it was real. Obviously not the brightest bulb in the pack as he didn't think he'd get into trouble. Sexual harassment of girls by the boys is a major problem and heart breaking to see. I could go on and on.

I think I've also suffered from "reverse culture shock." I am amazed at how angry, mean, and nasty Americans are in general...or at least in California. I don't know if I just couldn't see it when I first lived in the US because it was the norm, or things really have gotten bad. I don't want to sound like a Korea cheerleader, because it obviously has its problems, but America just doesn't feel like my home.


  • pkjh
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1467

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2018, 11:21:07 am »
I think I've also suffered from "reverse culture shock." I am amazed at how angry, mean, and nasty Americans are in general...or at least in California. I don't know if I just couldn't see it when I first lived in the US because it was the norm, or things really have gotten bad. I don't want to sound like a Korea cheerleader, because it obviously has its problems, but America just doesn't feel like my home.
It's always been there. But also, you're doing a job that can see the best, and worst of humanity everyday. Teachers, police, public court lawyers, doctors, cashiers, telemarketers, etc... Basically anyone who has to deal with a wide variety of people everyday well have to deal with a lot of angry people. Same in Korea, but you are shielded by the language barrier.

Now if I say had a job as private bank accountant, you'll most likely spend 70% of the time in an amazing cubicle.


  • Arsalan
  • Site Programmer

    • 1896

    • September 18, 2006, 02:00:00 pm
    • Alberta
    more
Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2018, 06:12:50 am »
I am really thinking of heading back to S.Korea as well, I miss it.  If I do it will be within the next few years though, I have to recover from my accident first and get things in order.

How's the teaching atmosphere now, I am thinking of Seoul and specifically working with Canadian Connections like my first time.


  • zola
  • The Legend

    • 2593

    • September 30, 2012, 06:56:11 am
    • Korea
Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2018, 07:30:37 am »
Not much has changed really. Salaries are about where they were 10 years ago. Which is a problem because the cost of living has gone through the roof. It used to be that most things were cheaper here than back home. Now it feels that almost everything is on par or more expensive than you'd find in the west. The exceptions being transport (which is creeping up) and maybe services like repairs etc. And healthcare if you are an American (which I'm not).

Still possible to save money and have a good time, but at least for me, the margins are getting a little thinner every year.

Kpip! - Martin 2018


  • salmatjie
  • Explorer

    • 8

    • September 17, 2011, 10:19:08 am
    • South Korea
Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2018, 11:28:15 pm »
good luck


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1244

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2018, 12:16:16 am »
I am really thinking of heading back to S.Korea as well, I miss it.  If I do it will be within the next few years though, I have to recover from my accident first and get things in order.

How's the teaching atmosphere now, I am thinking of Seoul and specifically working with Canadian Connections like my first time.

Teaching is still good in South Korea. I'd say that it could be better but it could be worse.

With an F visa teaching adults is the way to go. Study groups of 3-5 students at 15 won an hour per student or so. It's a great time to be alive.


Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2018, 02:02:04 pm »
Good luck guys on your return.

And always remember the big mistake you made on leaving in the first place.


  • SanderB
  • Super Waygook

    • 310

    • June 02, 2018, 06:25:54 pm
Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2019, 10:01:30 am »
I do miss the innocent positivity of the students but I absolutely hated the pollution. I would never want to live in that black soot cloud called Seoul again...perhaps the British school in Cheju-do or Daegu...
green everything


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 4916

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2019, 11:05:21 am »
I do miss the innocent positivity of the students but I absolutely hated the pollution. I would never want to live in that black soot cloud called Seoul again...perhaps the British school in Cheju-do or Daegu...

Daegu is an a big bowl shaped valley and is prone to inversions: it gets really sooty and gross too, unfortunately.  :sad:

That said, I'd take Daegu over Seoul any day of the week. Except weekends. That's when I need to head out to Busan or Seoul to catch a concert or two.


Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2019, 05:11:29 am »
Hello Waygook.org. Returning teacher here. I taught a number of years in Korea, went back to the States and started teaching here and absolutely hate it. Planning on heading back to Korea as soon as I can.

Good luck!  I'm sure it will be a great experience!

MD


Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2019, 09:26:24 pm »
  I am thinking of going back to Korea too. Why? Well, where I am from, work opportunities have tended to be limited, but also because I have lots of friends living in Korea and I really miss the nightlife at the weekends. I miss my friends, and some of the food and drink and places I used to visit, and stuff I did in Korea. I was also able to save money.So I would be really happy to go back.
   However, I have some reservations. Why? Well, one of my friends started at SMOE in 2001, when it was soooooo easy to get in. He did this long before I could go, and experienced a lot of great stuff. But 2 weeks ago he told me he was leaving Korea for good. Why? Low wages and high living costs, he said. That sent alarm bells ringing, because more than one of my friends has left Korea recently.
    Another point is that people are telling me to fly out to Korea with my apostilled docs, check into a hotel and look for a job. That would suggest there is this stampede of fresh graduates coming to Korea.
     On the other hand, I notice starting salaries that are occasionally as high as 2.5 million won, and for some kindie-elementary jobs, 2.8 million or 2.9 million won. It's a small point of hope.
   


Re: Greetings from returning teacher
« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2019, 09:59:18 pm »
  I am thinking of going back to Korea too. Why? Well, where I am from, work opportunities have tended to be limited, but also because I have lots of friends living in Korea and I really miss the nightlife at the weekends. I miss my friends, and some of the food and drink and places I used to visit, and stuff I did in Korea. I was also able to save money.So I would be really happy to go back.
   However, I have some reservations. Why? Well, one of my friends started at SMOE in 2001, when it was soooooo easy to get in. He did this long before I could go, and experienced a lot of great stuff. But 2 weeks ago he told me he was leaving Korea for good. Why? Low wages and high living costs, he said. That sent alarm bells ringing, because more than one of my friends has left Korea recently.
    Another point is that people are telling me to fly out to Korea with my apostilled docs, check into a hotel and look for a job. That would suggest there is this stampede of fresh graduates coming to Korea.
     On the other hand, I notice starting salaries that are occasionally as high as 2.5 million won, and for some kindie-elementary jobs, 2.8 million or 2.9 million won. It's a small point of hope.
   

I may be wrong here, but basically, the government has cut out most of the public school jobs, as well as some of the government policies changing in general. I think in the past a lot of those public school teachers transferred over to working for private companies.  These days there are less fresh teachers bieng recruited in officially so the game has changed a bit. There are plenty of jobs if you are willing to come down independently of a recruiter though (as I think your friend is suggesting). There are even a lot of the public schools that are desperate for teachers as well, I've had them negotiate with me directly for part time and full time work which I hadn't thought was possible in the past - in the past at least.

Welcome back to the both of you anyhow, iffen you make it back over :)
Co-creator of HSIP adult academy and halandstevenglish @ https://www.facebook.com/groups/halandsteveenglish