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Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2018, 08:35:54 am »
For beans-
ClubEspresso is really good but really out of the way (closest station is Anguk, followed by 20 minute bus ride to the middle of nowhere)
Coffee Factory in Yaksu isn't bad



  • oglop
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1842

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #21 on: September 04, 2018, 08:40:59 am »
i get my beans off gmarket. they are ok

where does everyone buy their beans?

any electronic grinder recommendations (that i can buy here)? i have one i bought online years ago, but it's extremely noisy and i wouldn't mind an upgrade

Like I said, I buy my beans from 죠커피 on Gmarket. They're always fresh, and even though they're not going to win any awards, they have a decent selection of varietals for reasonable prices. And they're always roasted one day before delivery.

Also, for a decent (not great) grinder, I recommend the Cuisinart DBM-8KR - it's cheap, relatively consistent grind, not too loud, and it's not ugly, either.

http://item.gmarket.co.kr/Item?goodscode=870916392&pos_shop_cd=SH&pos_class_cd=111111111&pos_class_kind=T&keyword_seqno=15761327312&search_keyword=%ec%bb%a4%ed%94%bc%ea%b7%b8%eb%9d%bc%ec%9d%b8%eb%8d%94

Or if you want a way better and quieter grind, you could go the hand grinder route, but nobody got time for that in the morning.
that's the grinder i have. noisy bastard, but gets the job done. was looking to upgrade, if only because it's starting to get full of old coffee powder gunk that seems impossible to clean out. i've also had it for 4-5 years too, so..

think i'll try out the 죠커피 beans for a change. thanks


Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #22 on: September 04, 2018, 08:43:07 am »
i get my beans off gmarket. they are ok

where does everyone buy their beans?

any electronic grinder recommendations (that i can buy here)? i have one i bought online years ago, but it's extremely noisy and i wouldn't mind an upgrade

Like I said, I buy my beans from 죠커피 on Gmarket. They're always fresh, and even though they're not going to win any awards, they have a decent selection of varietals for reasonable prices. And they're always roasted one day before delivery.

Also, for a decent (not great) grinder, I recommend the Cuisinart DBM-8KR - it's cheap, relatively consistent grind, not too loud, and it's not ugly, either.

http://item.gmarket.co.kr/Item?goodscode=870916392&pos_shop_cd=SH&pos_class_cd=111111111&pos_class_kind=T&keyword_seqno=15761327312&search_keyword=%ec%bb%a4%ed%94%bc%ea%b7%b8%eb%9d%bc%ec%9d%b8%eb%8d%94

Or if you want a way better and quieter grind, you could go the hand grinder route, but nobody got time for that in the morning.
that's the grinder i have. noisy bastard, but gets the job done. was looking to upgrade, if only because it's starting to get full of old coffee powder gunk that seems impossible to clean out. i've also had it for 4-5 years too, so..

think i'll try out the 죠커피 beans for a change. thanks

The Colombian Supremo is decent. Their Kenya AA isn't great. And their Mexican one is bad. I always get the Guatemalan Antigua, but it's got some pretty strong fruity notes, so it's not for everyone.

Also, make sure you select 'unground' so you just get beanzzzz.


  • oglop
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1842

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul


Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #24 on: September 04, 2018, 08:54:10 am »
Aeropress or die!

also buy a grinder and grind the beans yourself, at least 20 % better quality coffee... and the smell... im not religious but every morning i consider the existence.

AEROPRESS~~~~


Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #25 on: September 04, 2018, 01:55:14 pm »
hmm. that coffee seems to be double the price of the one i usually get

http://item.gmarket.co.kr/Item?goodscode=373087325&pos_shop_cd=SH&pos_class_cd=111111111&pos_class_kind=T&keyword_order=%be%cb%c4%e1%b4%de%c4%e1&keyword_seqno=15761791202&search_keyword=%ec%95%8c%ec%bd%a9%eb%8b%ac%ec%bd%a9

wonder if it's twice as good though?

Oh! I've literally ordered from them before. It was drinkable but I really didn't like it and went back to buying the HomePlus brand big bag beans. But then I started buying Joe Coffee instead. It might not be for you, but I sincerely enjoy it and think it's good.

The small bags are overpriced but if you order the bulkier ones it's pretty reasonable.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1238

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
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Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #26 on: September 04, 2018, 05:37:50 pm »
For the record,... they are not really beans, they are SEEDS.

(And peanuts are not nuts.)


  • CO2
  • The Legend

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    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Gunpo
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Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #27 on: September 04, 2018, 06:30:43 pm »
(And peanuts are not nuts.)

They're a legume!

The joys of fauxtherhood


  • Lazio
  • Veteran

    • 129

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #28 on: September 04, 2018, 06:57:45 pm »
When you open a big bag of whole beans, you can freeze them so they would stay fresh. Better than just keeping them out for months.
Make small portions in zip-lock bags, just enough for 5 days or a week. Remove as much air as possible before sealing the bags. Toss the small bags into one large bag. When you need coffee, just take out one small portion at least a few hours before you want to use it. Do not open the bag! Let it come to room temperature before you open it. Otherwise condensation will make the beans moist, and you don't want that.
Use these designated coffee bags again and again in the spirit of reducing  waste.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2018, 07:32:10 pm by Lazio »


  • oglop
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1842

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #29 on: September 04, 2018, 07:48:31 pm »
hmm. that coffee seems to be double the price of the one i usually get

http://item.gmarket.co.kr/Item?goodscode=373087325&pos_shop_cd=SH&pos_class_cd=111111111&pos_class_kind=T&keyword_order=%be%cb%c4%e1%b4%de%c4%e1&keyword_seqno=15761791202&search_keyword=%ec%95%8c%ec%bd%a9%eb%8b%ac%ec%bd%a9

wonder if it's twice as good though?

Oh! I've literally ordered from them before. It was drinkable but I really didn't like it and went back to buying the HomePlus brand big bag beans. But then I started buying Joe Coffee instead. It might not be for you, but I sincerely enjoy it and think it's good.

The small bags are overpriced but if you order the bulkier ones it's pretty reasonable.
ah nice. i've ordered from a few different gmarket coffee places and they've all been generally all the same (not that great tbh). i'll give this one a go then


Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #30 on: September 05, 2018, 07:47:13 am »
hmm. that coffee seems to be double the price of the one i usually get

http://item.gmarket.co.kr/Item?goodscode=373087325&pos_shop_cd=SH&pos_class_cd=111111111&pos_class_kind=T&keyword_order=%be%cb%c4%e1%b4%de%c4%e1&keyword_seqno=15761791202&search_keyword=%ec%95%8c%ec%bd%a9%eb%8b%ac%ec%bd%a9

wonder if it's twice as good though?

Oh! I've literally ordered from them before. It was drinkable but I really didn't like it and went back to buying the HomePlus brand big bag beans. But then I started buying Joe Coffee instead. It might not be for you, but I sincerely enjoy it and think it's good.

The small bags are overpriced but if you order the bulkier ones it's pretty reasonable.
ah nice. i've ordered from a few different gmarket coffee places and they've all been generally all the same (not that great tbh). i'll give this one a go then

Yeah. That was exactly my experience. I ordered from about four or five different online roasters, and each time I was like, "Ehhhhh..." and ended up going to the HomePlus ones (which honestly weren't bad if you got the one specific variety. I forget exactly what it was) and then I tried this one and I was like, "Hey. This is good enough for me to keep buying it."


Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #31 on: September 05, 2018, 09:08:28 am »
For beans, if you live in Seoul, I really recommend shopping around. A lot of them will do mail order. Whenver you're in an area, either along your normal routes or even just in a random part of the city and are looking for a coffee, try and scout out an independent coffee shop. Sure you sometimes get some busts, but if you buy in small quantities, it's not so bad. The best is if you can find one along your normal commutes so you can stop in regulalry and buy them in small quantities- 100/200g is best so you get fresh roasts. On the other hand, if you're in the stix, that simply isn't an option, so keep your ear to the ground and scout for mail order or various suppliers like many here have suggested.

One thing to keep in mind is that all of us have different tastes. For example, I prefer city roast and I prefer Central/South American coffees. Other people love dark roasts (though darker is sometimes good in iced coffees) or crave the finest Africa has to offer. So, if you're curious be sure to ask and also, I'll try to mention those things in the future.


  • gogators!
  • The Legend

    • 3386

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #32 on: September 06, 2018, 10:31:14 am »
When you open a big bag of whole beans, you can freeze them so they would stay fresh. Better than just keeping them out for months.
Make small portions in zip-lock bags, just enough for 5 days or a week. Remove as much air as possible before sealing the bags. Toss the small bags into one large bag. When you need coffee, just take out one small portion at least a few hours before you want to use it. Do not open the bag! Let it come to room temperature before you open it. Otherwise condensation will make the beans moist, and you don't want that.
Use these designated coffee bags again and again in the spirit of reducing  waste.

Quote
The specialty coffee community has long been opposed to storing coffee in the freezer. The main argument centers around the idea that there is a large amount of humidity in refrigerators and freezers.

Roasted coffee beans have a low moisture level, which means they’re open to absorbing moisture from their environment (they’re hygroscopic). When they soak up moisture, the original flavors become tainted, muddy, and plain weird. The beans become a shadow of their former selves, flavor-speaking.

In a freezer, this humidity comes packaged with flavors from nearby foods. Trust me on this one, coffee that’s soaked up the aromas of garlic or lasagna is not something you want to wake up to in the morning.

Read: 5 Things That Ruin Your Coffee

Humidity also speeds the decay of coffee bean chemical structures. Hundreds of chemical reactions can be ignited by an increase in bean moisture. You want this to happen during regular brewing, but not while your coffee is in storage.

Microorganisms typically thrive in humid climates as well since they often need water to digest their food. You’re unlikely to run into microbial growth in a freezer, but it’s still possible.

You may be thinking to yourself that you can easily avoid all of these things if you just store the beans in a dry, airtight container. That was my first thought too. Then I discovered this.

When you open an airtight container that was just pulled out of the freezer, condensation rapidly forms on the surface of your food or coffee beans. This condensation brings about all the humidity issues we’re talking about immediately.

For now, just know that there are a million and one things that can go wrong when you store coffee beans in your freezer.

Free advice, especially on the Internet, is worth what you pay for it.

Go to Costco. They've got great coffee at great prices.


  • Lazio
  • Veteran

    • 129

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #33 on: September 06, 2018, 12:22:12 pm »
When you open a big bag of whole beans, you can freeze them so they would stay fresh. Better than just keeping them out for months.
Make small portions in zip-lock bags, just enough for 5 days or a week. Remove as much air as possible before sealing the bags. Toss the small bags into one large bag. When you need coffee, just take out one small portion at least a few hours before you want to use it. Do not open the bag! Let it come to room temperature before you open it. Otherwise condensation will make the beans moist, and you don't want that.
Use these designated coffee bags again and again in the spirit of reducing  waste.

Quote
The specialty coffee community has long been opposed to storing coffee in the freezer. The main argument centers around the idea that there is a large amount of humidity in refrigerators and freezers.

Roasted coffee beans have a low moisture level, which means they’re open to absorbing moisture from their environment (they’re hygroscopic). When they soak up moisture, the original flavors become tainted, muddy, and plain weird. The beans become a shadow of their former selves, flavor-speaking.

In a freezer, this humidity comes packaged with flavors from nearby foods. Trust me on this one, coffee that’s soaked up the aromas of garlic or lasagna is not something you want to wake up to in the morning.

Read: 5 Things That Ruin Your Coffee

Humidity also speeds the decay of coffee bean chemical structures. Hundreds of chemical reactions can be ignited by an increase in bean moisture. You want this to happen during regular brewing, but not while your coffee is in storage.

Microorganisms typically thrive in humid climates as well since they often need water to digest their food. You’re unlikely to run into microbial growth in a freezer, but it’s still possible.

You may be thinking to yourself that you can easily avoid all of these things if you just store the beans in a dry, airtight container. That was my first thought too. Then I discovered this.

When you open an airtight container that was just pulled out of the freezer, condensation rapidly forms on the surface of your food or coffee beans. This condensation brings about all the humidity issues we’re talking about immediately.

For now, just know that there are a million and one things that can go wrong when you store coffee beans in your freezer.

Free advice, especially on the Internet, is worth what you pay for it.

Go to Costco. They've got great coffee at great prices.

There is a debate among experts whether to freeze or not to freeze coffee. You just picked something from the opposing side but when you google it, you will find just as many articles that suggest freezing.
Here is one :
https://www.home-barista.com/store-coffee-in-freezer.html
''Two months is safe: Freshly roasted coffee that is immediately frozen after roasting in a near airtight container in a very cold freezer, can be kept undisturbed in the freezer for at least 2 months and be expected to produce espressos that are not obviously inferior to those made from fresh coffee that has never been frozen.

Freezing does not accelerate staling after defrosting: At least over a period of time extending to about 8 days after roasting, using the roasting and freezing procedure used here, there was no evidence that previously frozen coffee deteriorates more quickly after defrosting than does coffee that has never been frozen.''


There is no doubt, fresh coffee is the best but when you open a one kilo bag and just store it in the cupboard, its quality will deteriorate very fast. Even if you close it in a near air tight container, by opening it daily you let moisture in.
What you quoted is actually not a valid reasoning why not to freeze. First of all, a freezer is dry and not humid. Cold air can't hold much moisture that is just a fact. Every modern fridge and freezer removes moisture from the inside. That is why you don't have ice building up inside like it used to in old refrigerators like 20 years ago. In this climate during the summer the humidity is way way worse outside.
 Secondly, I put my coffee in two ziplock bags and both seal airtight. So even if there was high humidity in the freezer, it doesn't get to it. Also, it doesnt absorb odors and such in two bags.
And the moisture condensation can be easily avoided if you don't open the bag when its cold. Even your quoted text says ''if you open it right away''. Well, don't be an idiot and wait untill it comes to room temperature!

There are many ways to screw up coffee freezing but if you do it right, it is much better than keeping and opened bag of coffee in your cupboard for months. I tried both ways and found the freezing method better.
But in the end, I don't really care what you or others do. Feel free to use dead coffee beans from the cupboard.


  • gogators!
  • The Legend

    • 3386

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #34 on: September 06, 2018, 02:23:35 pm »
When you open a big bag of whole beans, you can freeze them so they would stay fresh. Better than just keeping them out for months.
Make small portions in zip-lock bags, just enough for 5 days or a week. Remove as much air as possible before sealing the bags. Toss the small bags into one large bag. When you need coffee, just take out one small portion at least a few hours before you want to use it. Do not open the bag! Let it come to room temperature before you open it. Otherwise condensation will make the beans moist, and you don't want that.
Use these designated coffee bags again and again in the spirit of reducing  waste.

Quote
The specialty coffee community has long been opposed to storing coffee in the freezer. The main argument centers around the idea that there is a large amount of humidity in refrigerators and freezers.

Roasted coffee beans have a low moisture level, which means they’re open to absorbing moisture from their environment (they’re hygroscopic). When they soak up moisture, the original flavors become tainted, muddy, and plain weird. The beans become a shadow of their former selves, flavor-speaking.

In a freezer, this humidity comes packaged with flavors from nearby foods. Trust me on this one, coffee that’s soaked up the aromas of garlic or lasagna is not something you want to wake up to in the morning.

Read: 5 Things That Ruin Your Coffee

Humidity also speeds the decay of coffee bean chemical structures. Hundreds of chemical reactions can be ignited by an increase in bean moisture. You want this to happen during regular brewing, but not while your coffee is in storage.

Microorganisms typically thrive in humid climates as well since they often need water to digest their food. You’re unlikely to run into microbial growth in a freezer, but it’s still possible.

You may be thinking to yourself that you can easily avoid all of these things if you just store the beans in a dry, airtight container. That was my first thought too. Then I discovered this.

When you open an airtight container that was just pulled out of the freezer, condensation rapidly forms on the surface of your food or coffee beans. This condensation brings about all the humidity issues we’re talking about immediately.

For now, just know that there are a million and one things that can go wrong when you store coffee beans in your freezer.

Free advice, especially on the Internet, is worth what you pay for it.

Go to Costco. They've got great coffee at great prices.

There is a debate among experts whether to freeze or not to freeze coffee. You just picked something from the opposing side but when you google it, you will find just as many articles that suggest freezing.
Here is one :
https://www.home-barista.com/store-coffee-in-freezer.html
''Two months is safe: Freshly roasted coffee that is immediately frozen after roasting in a near airtight container in a very cold freezer, can be kept undisturbed in the freezer for at least 2 months and be expected to produce espressos that are not obviously inferior to those made from fresh coffee that has never been frozen.

Freezing does not accelerate staling after defrosting: At least over a period of time extending to about 8 days after roasting, using the roasting and freezing procedure used here, there was no evidence that previously frozen coffee deteriorates more quickly after defrosting than does coffee that has never been frozen.''


There is no doubt, fresh coffee is the best but when you open a one kilo bag and just store it in the cupboard, its quality will deteriorate very fast. Even if you close it in a near air tight container, by opening it daily you let moisture in.
What you quoted is actually not a valid reasoning why not to freeze. First of all, a freezer is dry and not humid. Cold air can't hold much moisture that is just a fact. Every modern fridge and freezer removes moisture from the inside. That is why you don't have ice building up inside like it used to in old refrigerators like 20 years ago. In this climate during the summer the humidity is way way worse outside.
 Secondly, I put my coffee in two ziplock bags and both seal airtight. So even if there was high humidity in the freezer, it doesn't get to it. Also, it doesnt absorb odors and such in two bags.
And the moisture condensation can be easily avoided if you don't open the bag when its cold. Even your quoted text says ''if you open it right away''. Well, don't be an idiot and wait untill it comes to room temperature!

There are many ways to screw up coffee freezing but if you do it right, it is much better than keeping and opened bag of coffee in your cupboard for months. I tried both ways and found the freezing method better.
But in the end, I don't really care what you or others do. Feel free to use dead coffee beans from the cupboard.
False dilemma. There are other, better alternatives.

" Even if you close it in a near air tight container, by opening it daily you let moisture in. " So you never open your magically completely airtight ziploc bags?

BTW, I'm guessing your freezer doesn't have an ice maker.


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 3815

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #35 on: September 06, 2018, 02:28:35 pm »
When you open a big bag of whole beans, you can freeze them so they would stay fresh. Better than just keeping them out for months.
Make small portions in zip-lock bags, just enough for 5 days or a week. Remove as much air as possible before sealing the bags. Toss the small bags into one large bag. When you need coffee, just take out one small portion at least a few hours before you want to use it. Do not open the bag! Let it come to room temperature before you open it. Otherwise condensation will make the beans moist, and you don't want that.
Use these designated coffee bags again and again in the spirit of reducing  waste.

Quote
The specialty coffee community has long been opposed to storing coffee in the freezer. The main argument centers around the idea that there is a large amount of humidity in refrigerators and freezers.

Roasted coffee beans have a low moisture level, which means they’re open to absorbing moisture from their environment (they’re hygroscopic). When they soak up moisture, the original flavors become tainted, muddy, and plain weird. The beans become a shadow of their former selves, flavor-speaking.

In a freezer, this humidity comes packaged with flavors from nearby foods. Trust me on this one, coffee that’s soaked up the aromas of garlic or lasagna is not something you want to wake up to in the morning.

Read: 5 Things That Ruin Your Coffee

Humidity also speeds the decay of coffee bean chemical structures. Hundreds of chemical reactions can be ignited by an increase in bean moisture. You want this to happen during regular brewing, but not while your coffee is in storage.

Microorganisms typically thrive in humid climates as well since they often need water to digest their food. You’re unlikely to run into microbial growth in a freezer, but it’s still possible.

You may be thinking to yourself that you can easily avoid all of these things if you just store the beans in a dry, airtight container. That was my first thought too. Then I discovered this.

When you open an airtight container that was just pulled out of the freezer, condensation rapidly forms on the surface of your food or coffee beans. This condensation brings about all the humidity issues we’re talking about immediately.

For now, just know that there are a million and one things that can go wrong when you store coffee beans in your freezer.

Free advice, especially on the Internet, is worth what you pay for it.

Go to Costco. They've got great coffee at great prices.

There is a debate among experts whether to freeze or not to freeze coffee. You just picked something from the opposing side but when you google it, you will find just as many articles that suggest freezing.
Here is one :
https://www.home-barista.com/store-coffee-in-freezer.html
''Two months is safe: Freshly roasted coffee that is immediately frozen after roasting in a near airtight container in a very cold freezer, can be kept undisturbed in the freezer for at least 2 months and be expected to produce espressos that are not obviously inferior to those made from fresh coffee that has never been frozen.

Freezing does not accelerate staling after defrosting: At least over a period of time extending to about 8 days after roasting, using the roasting and freezing procedure used here, there was no evidence that previously frozen coffee deteriorates more quickly after defrosting than does coffee that has never been frozen.''


There is no doubt, fresh coffee is the best but when you open a one kilo bag and just store it in the cupboard, its quality will deteriorate very fast. Even if you close it in a near air tight container, by opening it daily you let moisture in.
What you quoted is actually not a valid reasoning why not to freeze. First of all, a freezer is dry and not humid. Cold air can't hold much moisture that is just a fact. Every modern fridge and freezer removes moisture from the inside. That is why you don't have ice building up inside like it used to in old refrigerators like 20 years ago. In this climate during the summer the humidity is way way worse outside.
 Secondly, I put my coffee in two ziplock bags and both seal airtight. So even if there was high humidity in the freezer, it doesn't get to it. Also, it doesnt absorb odors and such in two bags.
And the moisture condensation can be easily avoided if you don't open the bag when its cold. Even your quoted text says ''if you open it right away''. Well, don't be an idiot and wait untill it comes to room temperature!

There are many ways to screw up coffee freezing but if you do it right, it is much better than keeping and opened bag of coffee in your cupboard for months. I tried both ways and found the freezing method better.
But in the end, I don't really care what you or others do. Feel free to use dead coffee beans from the cupboard.
False dilemma. There are other, better alternatives.

" Even if you close it in a near air tight container, by opening it daily you let moisture in. " So you never open your magically completely airtight ziploc bags?

The process is to have daily bags inside a larger bag. The other daily bags don't get opened until they are ready for use!


  • Lazio
  • Veteran

    • 129

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #36 on: September 06, 2018, 06:44:39 pm »
False dilemma. There are other, better alternatives.

" Even if you close it in a near air tight container, by opening it daily you let moisture in. " So you never open your magically completely airtight ziploc bags?

BTW, I'm guessing your freezer doesn't have an ice maker.

My freezer doesn't have an ice maker.

I wrote that I make small portions, enough for 5 days or so. I only open one, use it and go for another one when it runs out. How is better than just simply making small bags and not freezing it? Quite simply, deep freezing slows down the unfavourable chemical processes in the beans, that start after contacting air and moisture. Basically as soon as you open a sealed bag of coffee, its quality will immediately start to deteriorate. Freezing makes this process slower.

Like I said, this method worked for me and I'm not the only one. I guess you never tried so maybe you should try it before judging. I just disproved all the points raised in your quoted text. FYI: I have two freezers and two hygrometers. I just checked a few times and the RH seems to fluctuate between 1% and 10%. Mostly under 5%. So it's bone dry in there.
I go through about 4 kilos of coffee/year and have been doing so for the last 10 years. Thats a lot of coffee and trust me when I say that I tried lots of different ways but the freezing worked best for me.

Why don't you post your ''better''method then? And how do you know if its better anyway, if you haven't tried freezing
« Last Edit: September 06, 2018, 07:25:27 pm by Lazio »


  • gogators!
  • The Legend

    • 3386

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #37 on: September 06, 2018, 07:39:43 pm »
False dilemma. There are other, better alternatives.

" Even if you close it in a near air tight container, by opening it daily you let moisture in. " So you never open your magically completely airtight ziploc bags?

BTW, I'm guessing your freezer doesn't have an ice maker.

My freezer doesn't have an ice maker.

I wrote that I make small portions, enough for 5 days or so. I only open one, use it and go for another one when it runs out. How is better than just simply making small bags and not freezing it? Quite simply, deep freezing slows down the unfavourable chemical processes in the beans, that start after contacting air and moisture. Basically as soon as you open a sealed bag of coffee, its quality will immediately start to deteriorate. Freezing makes this process slower.

Like I said, this method worked for me and I'm not the only one. I guess you never tried so maybe you should try it before judging. I just disproved all the points raised in your quoted text. FYI: I have two freezers and two hygrometers. I just checked a few times and the RH seems to fluctuate between 1% and 10%. Mostly under 5%. So it's bone dry in there.
I go through about 4 kilos of coffee/year and have been doing so for the last 10 years. Thats a lot of coffee and trust me when I say that I tried lots of different ways but the freezing worked best for me.

Why don't you post your ''better''method then? And how do you know if its better anyway, if you haven't tried freezing
I have tried it. IME, the beans kept in an airtight container tasted fresher.

Here's what I do,vwhich is what the NCA recommends:
Quote
To preserve your beans’ fresh roasted flavor as long as possible, store them in an opaque, air-tight container at room temperature. Coffee beans can be beautiful, but avoid clear canisters which will allow light to compromise the taste of your coffee.

Keep your beans in a dark and cool location. A cabinet near the oven is often too warm, and so is a spot on the kitchen counter that gets strong afternoon sun.

Coffee's retail packaging is generally not ideal for long-term storage. If possible, invest in storage canisters with an airtight seal.



  • Mister Tim
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1473

    • September 08, 2013, 10:33:54 am
    • SK
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #38 on: September 07, 2018, 10:04:49 am »
What do you guys do with your used coffee grounds here? Do they go in the regular trash bags, the food waste bins, or something else entirely? I just scattered them in my parents' garden back home, but I'm a bit clueless about what to do with them here.


  • gogators!
  • The Legend

    • 3386

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: The Coffee Thread
« Reply #39 on: September 07, 2018, 11:09:21 am »
What do you guys do with your used coffee grounds here? Do they go in the regular trash bags, the food waste bins, or something else entirely? I just scattered them in my parents' garden back home, but I'm a bit clueless about what to do with them here.
Food waste.