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Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #40 on: July 06, 2018, 11:18:59 am »
Once a cow stops giving milk, she often gets a career change as hamburger. Not high grade beef, but not wasted either.
True. That can of Alpo has to come from somewhere.



Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #41 on: July 06, 2018, 11:20:06 am »
Could you answer my jalapeno cheese question please. Once I receive an answer that will guide me on my whether I will start my own farm or not. Thanks mate.
Are you looking at a hobby farm or industrial scale? For a hobby farm, when you make your homemade cheese, you can simply dice up and mix in some jalapeenies from a jar you buy at E-mart.

For industrial scale, you'll have to source jalapenos- either grown domestically or imported. Then you'll have to process them and your cheese product, have some sort of inspection and quality control, and then make sure to package and distribute them.

Good luck on your dairy farm- And remember, don't bother watching where you step. Just get some good boots and a boot scrape by your front door.

Thanks mate. I'll be hiring Yemeni refugees to run my farm. I'll still be teaching ABCs as I don't like to get my hands dirty.

Anyway thanks for the banter. I'm out, i've readched my maximum fun quota for the day if i laugh any more I'll get muted for 3 weeks again.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2018, 11:22:23 am by AvecPommesFrites »
Who is here in 2019?


  • oglop
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1843

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #42 on: July 06, 2018, 11:22:21 am »
korea is surrounded by countries that produce great fruit and vegetables. ah wait, i've got to eat a 9,000won, poor-tasting mango because that mango is grown in korea

england has the best of european fruit and veg, and it's, what, a quarter of the price (and much nicer)

admittedly, some imports have become cheaper and more available (noticeably beef, recently), but most fresh groceries are still outrageously priced


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #43 on: July 06, 2018, 11:23:18 am »
Dude Korea has one of the most protectionist economies in the world. It's not like there isn't anything they can do about it. They can lower their tariffs and put in limits on middlemen mark ups. It's not rocket science.

Canada and the U.S. are currently in a flap over dairy tariffs. Obviously some protectionism is involved, yet in both countries, dairy products are relatively cheaper.

Dude, where is all this land that Korea can grow crops? Protectionism or not, it still has to be flown in by airplane or shipped across the Pacific ocean by boat, a journey that takes between 2-3 weeks. That means more labor costs, more refrigeration costs, more fuel costs, etc.

I don't think you quite grasp the logistical and agricultural differences.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #44 on: July 06, 2018, 11:25:40 am »
I finally understand the reason that Hanwoo is so expensive is because it is being imported by sea and air. That must be why the Australlian and American beef is cheaper. They must be able to swim here unlike the Hanwoo cows. Thanks Martin.
Hanwoo has also acquired "luxury" status which further increases it's cost- all things being equal, Korean consumers will buy Hanwoo over Australian beef.

The market price for hanwoo is dictated by consumers, NOT middlemen. If Korean consumers stopped consuming hanwoo, the price would fall.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #45 on: July 06, 2018, 11:26:40 am »
korea is surrounded by countries that produce great fruit and vegetables. ah wait, i've got to eat a 9,000won, poor-tasting mango because that mango is grown in korea

Those are really grown in Korea? :huh:


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #46 on: July 06, 2018, 11:30:08 am »
I finally understand the reason that Hanwoo is so expensive is because it is being imported by sea and air. That must be why the Australlian and American beef is cheaper. They must be able to swim here unlike the Hanwoo cows. Thanks Martin.
Hanwoo has also acquired "luxury" status which further increases it's cost- all things being equal, Korean consumers will buy Hanwoo over Australian beef.

The market price for hanwoo is dictated by consumers, NOT middlemen. If Korean consumers stopped consuming hanwoo, the price would fall.

OK, one last question for ya Martin.

Why does Hanwoo smell like shit? The foreign meet doesn't have that foul smell. I know y'all know what I'm talking about here I've seen it posted before.
Who is here in 2019?


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #47 on: July 06, 2018, 11:37:11 am »
Where does Hanwoo come from Martin?

Where does Cheese come from Martin?

Dairy cows and beef cattle are not the same. Duh. Obviously you know nothing about farming.

And no, a cow being slaughtered for beef can't make milk after it's been slaughtered.

And you get either milk OR cheese from the yield.

Sorry, I'm a loser from back home teaching ABCs . Are you saying a beef cow can't produce milk? I thought all cows were capable of producing milk after birthing a calf? I suggest taking the milk before slaughtering the cow.

Does the cheese come straight out of the udder? How do they get the jalapenos in? Do they feed the cow chilies before milking?

Due to BSE all "meat" cows in the UK and Ireland must be slaughtered before 36 months old.  Most are slaughtered at around 2 years, too young for rearing young. Cows become receptive about 2-3 years old, so there is no crossover.  I presume Korea follows similar guidelines.


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1402

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #48 on: July 06, 2018, 11:37:19 am »
Dude Korea has one of the most protectionist economies in the world. It's not like there isn't anything they can do about it. They can lower their tariffs and put in limits on middlemen mark ups. It's not rocket science.

Canada and the U.S. are currently in a flap over dairy tariffs. Obviously some protectionism is involved, yet in both countries, dairy products are relatively cheaper.

Dude, where is all this land that Korea can grow crops? Protectionism or not, it still has to be flown in by airplane or shipped across the Pacific ocean by boat, a journey that takes between 2-3 weeks. That means more labor costs, more refrigeration costs, more fuel costs, etc.

I don't think you quite grasp the logistical and agricultural differences.

I wasn't talking about land use.

TARIFF SCHEDULE OF KOREA - 541 -
http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2010/october/tradoc_146765.PDF

0409000000 Natural honey.  243% or 1,864won/kg, whichever is the greater See paragraph 10 of Append 2-A-1
276% tariff for honey, seems fair. No protectionism there.

 Onions
135% or
180won/kg,
whichever is the
greater

Sweet peppers (bell type)
270% or
6,210won/kg,
whichever is the
greater

Garlic
360% or
1,800won/kg,
whichever is the
greater

Fresh (Beans)
385% or
338won/kg,
whichever is the
greater

Macadamia nuts 30 7
0802901010 In shell
566.8% or
2,664won/kg,
whichever is the
greater
15
0802901020 Shelled
566.8% or
2,664won/kg,
whichever is the
greater

Jujubes
611.5% or
5,800won/kg,
whichever is the
greater

Ginger
377.3% or
931won/kg,
whichever is the
greater


  • Savant
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1894

    • April 07, 2012, 11:35:31 pm
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #49 on: July 06, 2018, 11:37:55 am »
I finally understand the reason that Hanwoo is so expensive is because it is being imported by sea and air. That must be why the Australlian and American beef is cheaper. They must be able to swim here unlike the Hanwoo cows. Thanks Martin.
Hanwoo has also acquired "luxury" status which further increases it's cost- all things being equal, Korean consumers will buy Hanwoo over Australian beef.

The market price for hanwoo is dictated by consumers, NOT middlemen. If Korean consumers stopped consuming hanwoo, the price would fall.

Thatís got to be in your Top 10 list of BS explanations.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #50 on: July 06, 2018, 11:41:04 am »
OK, one last question for ya Martin.

Why does Hanwoo smell like shit? The foreign meet doesn't have that foul smell. I know y'all know what I'm talking about here I've seen it posted before.
Which Hanwoo and in what case? In terms of Korean bbq, hanwoo works quite well. However, try making western dishes with Hanwoo and it comes up a little short.

On the other hand, Australian beef for Korean bbq, can range from superb to questionable. And don't even get me started on American beef for Korean bbq- blech. However, for a good burger or making a sandwich? American please.

As far as smell, the only thing I can surmise is you're talking about the smell all beef has when it's freshly slaughtered as opposed to having sat in the freezer of a cargo ship for 20 days.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #51 on: July 06, 2018, 11:42:01 am »
I finally understand the reason that Hanwoo is so expensive is because it is being imported by sea and air. That must be why the Australlian and American beef is cheaper. They must be able to swim here unlike the Hanwoo cows. Thanks Martin.
Hanwoo has also acquired "luxury" status which further increases it's cost- all things being equal, Korean consumers will buy Hanwoo over Australian beef.

The market price for hanwoo is dictated by consumers, NOT middlemen. If Korean consumers stopped consuming hanwoo, the price would fall.

Thatís got to be in your Top 10 list of BS explanations.

I did go a little overboard there- I should say is just as much driven by consumers AS middlemen. There certainly are forces at work to inflate it a little, but as far as ALL food- again, geography is king.


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 3819

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #52 on: July 06, 2018, 11:48:20 am »
I finally understand the reason that Hanwoo is so expensive is because it is being imported by sea and air. That must be why the Australlian and American beef is cheaper. They must be able to swim here unlike the Hanwoo cows. Thanks Martin.
Hanwoo has also acquired "luxury" status which further increases it's cost- all things being equal, Korean consumers will buy Hanwoo over Australian beef.

The market price for hanwoo is dictated by consumers, NOT middlemen. If Korean consumers stopped consuming hanwoo, the price would fall.

Thatís got to be in your Top 10 list of BS explanations.

I did go a little overboard there- I should say is just as much driven by consumers AS middlemen. There certainly are forces at work to inflate it a little, but as far as ALL food- again, geography is king.

As the tariff schedule posted above clearly shows, political lobbying is "ace" to that king.

To be fair, we have Canadian milk, American corn.... all countries do this to some extent, but the protectionism here in Korea is wider in scope and deeper in cost.

« Last Edit: July 06, 2018, 11:57:49 am by JNM »


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #53 on: July 06, 2018, 12:01:45 pm »
I finally understand the reason that Hanwoo is so expensive is because it is being imported by sea and air. That must be why the Australlian and American beef is cheaper. They must be able to swim here unlike the Hanwoo cows. Thanks Martin.
Hanwoo has also acquired "luxury" status which further increases it's cost- all things being equal, Korean consumers will buy Hanwoo over Australian beef.

The market price for hanwoo is dictated by consumers, NOT middlemen. If Korean consumers stopped consuming hanwoo, the price would fall.

Thatís got to be in your Top 10 list of BS explanations.

I did go a little overboard there- I should say is just as much driven by consumers AS middlemen. There certainly are forces at work to inflate it a little, but as far as ALL food- again, geography is king.

As the tariff schedule posted above, political lobbying is "ace" to that king.

To be fair, we have Canadian milk, American corn.... all countries do this to some extent, but the protectionism here in Korea is wider in scope and deeper in cost.

And of course, Canada has tariffs on South Korean imports.

http://fta.go.kr/webmodule/_PSD_FTA/ca/2/eng/02(2)_EN_KCFTA_Tariff_Schedule_of_Canada.pdf

The thing is that South Korea has much lower agricultural potential output relative to Canada due to geography. This will naturally affect trade and tariffs. And we're just arguing where the costs come from right now.

There's still to be argued whether such barriers are important for protecting Korean industry, even with higher costs. Employment and healthy industry in my opinion is more important than slightly cheaper consumer goods. And certainly South Korea should not have its trade policy subject to the demands of guest English teachers for cheaper imported cheese.


  • gideonvasquez
  • Super Waygook

    • 457

    • August 27, 2015, 08:42:34 am
    • Uisung - Gyeongbuk-do
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #54 on: July 06, 2018, 01:29:38 pm »
The Korean cheese tariffs (at least between Korea and the US) are I think 28%? And they are supposed to go to 0% by 2026 according to the free-trade agreement. The weird thing to me about these particular tariffs is that countries usually use them to protect domestic industry. But there isn't much of a domestic fresh dairy industry for things that aren't yogurt, mozzarella, or that weird not-quite-cheese spread thing they sell sometimes. In terms of selection I just grab that aged cheddar and some fresh mozzarella which isn't terrible. I also make queso fresco for tacos and burritos sometimes.

I would like to see a bit of a widening in selection from domestic suppliers away from just yogurt and soft cheeses. But hard cheeses take time and capital so I understand why they might not take the risk if the market wouldn't support it.


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 4929

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #55 on: July 06, 2018, 02:09:11 pm »
The Korean cheese tariffs (at least between Korea and the US) are I think 28%? And they are supposed to go to 0% by 2026 according to the free-trade agreement. The weird thing to me about these particular tariffs is that countries usually use them to protect domestic industry. But there isn't much of a domestic fresh dairy industry for things that aren't yogurt, mozzarella, or that weird not-quite-cheese spread thing they sell sometimes. In terms of selection I just grab that aged cheddar and some fresh mozzarella which isn't terrible. I also make queso fresco for tacos and burritos sometimes.

I would like to see a bit of a widening in selection from domestic suppliers away from just yogurt and soft cheeses. But hard cheeses take time and capital so I understand why they might not take the risk if the market wouldn't support it.
Both Emart and Home plus have been stocking blocks of Parmesan and romano these last few months, neither of which are terribly overpriced. They go great with pastas and salads, and taste infinitely better than the Parmesan powdered crap they previously only had. They also have gouda and a bunch of the soft cheeses, although they're definitely "import" quality.
    Korea's cheese selections have definitely progressed by leaps and bounds since I first got here!

Oh, and if you wanna support a small ESL teacher owned business here in Korea, check out https://www.facebook.com/waegfarm/. Their stuff is not bad!


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #56 on: July 10, 2018, 06:43:25 am »
Note: The blander, relatively softer cheeses that Koreans tend to gravitate towards go well in already flavorful dishes like ddukbokki. A bit like Cass and kimchi, if you ask Gordon Ramsey :P


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 3819

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #57 on: July 10, 2018, 07:17:55 am »
Note: The blander, relatively softer cheeses that Koreans tend to gravitate towards go well in already flavorful dishes like ddukbokki. A bit like Cass and kimchi, if you ask Gordon Ramsey :P

Good point.

I've often said what is missing from spicy Korean food is balance.

Other spicy cuisines give you some balance; Mexican has sour cream, Indian has butter and yogurt, and Italian has many cheeses.

Milk and ice cream are common here, but they haven't paired dairy with spicy food.



Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #58 on: July 10, 2018, 07:27:35 am »
I disagree. Sour cream on most Mexican dishes is atrocious and completely unnecessary. Also, I don't need any butter or yogurt with my vindaloo. Milder spice or a boquet of flavors is fine, but no need to dilute spice simply for balance's sake.

That being said, cheesy ddukbeokki is sometimes good.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #59 on: July 10, 2018, 07:32:27 am »
Sour cream on most Mexican dishes is atrocious and completely unnecessary.

I like it, but I wonder if it isn't more of a tex-mex thing.