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Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2018, 09:41:11 am »
Going to visit family in the UK in August. Looks like you can still get that 3 year old cheddar from M&S.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2018, 09:53:06 am »
There's plenty of selection (albeit mediocre supermarket cheese from back home), at least in Seoul.

As for price and selection: Welcome to being an immigrant. The locals like different food, and stuff has to be imported and domestic agriculture (on much less arable land), is dedicated to products serving the local market.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #22 on: July 06, 2018, 09:54:31 am »
There's plenty of selection (albeit mediocre supermarket cheese from back home), at least in Seoul.

As for price and selection: Welcome to being an immigrant. The locals like different food, and stuff has to be imported and domestic agriculture (on much less arable land), is dedicated to products serving the local market.

Where does Hanwoo come from Martin?

Where does Cheese come from Martin?

Are the cows too busy to do both?

:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
You're having a shocker today mate.

:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
« Last Edit: July 06, 2018, 09:58:07 am by AvecPommesFrites »
Who is here in 2019?


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #23 on: July 06, 2018, 09:57:01 am »
Going to visit family in the UK in August. Looks like you can still get that 3 year old cheddar from M&S.

And it'll cost a few quid at most.  :sad: I bought back a kilo block from Waitrose and it was 2/3 quid or something like that.  When I come back from Sweden, I always bring back a big wedge of Västerbotten cheese.



Ah, to be a cheese smuggler.


  • oglop
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1843

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #24 on: July 06, 2018, 09:58:33 am »
There's plenty of selection (albeit mediocre supermarket cheese from back home), at least in Seoul.

As for price and selection: Welcome to being an immigrant. The locals like different food, and stuff has to be imported and domestic agriculture (on much less arable land), is dedicated to products serving the local market.
nothing says serving the local market than selling home-grown watermelons for 20,000won each. a lot of the local produce is just as much of a rip-off as the imported stuff.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #25 on: July 06, 2018, 10:12:20 am »
Going to visit family in the UK in August. Looks like you can still get that 3 year old cheddar from M&S.

And it'll cost a few quid at most.  :sad: I bought back a kilo block from Waitrose and it was 2/3 quid or something like that.  When I come back from Sweden, I always bring back a big wedge of Västerbotten cheese.



Ah, to be a cheese smuggler.

There's a euphemism in there somewhere  :laugh:

Actually, I'm sure you shouldn't be bringing in dairy products so I have the 'Maybe my lovely mother put it in my case to comfort me  :-* ' with a little sad puppy face.

Where does Hanwoo come from Martin?

Where does Cheese come from Martin?

Are the cows too busy to do both?

You're having a shocker today mate.

  :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Who else could be triggered and start fights in a 'Cheese' thread and a 'Weather' thread?

 :cheesy: :cheesy: :cheesy: :cheesy:

Hahaha.

I like that Jalapeno colvy jack cheese usually pick a block up for w5-6k.
Who is here in 2019?


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #26 on: July 06, 2018, 10:22:36 am »
Where does Hanwoo come from Martin?

Where does Cheese come from Martin?

Dairy cows and beef cattle are not the same. Duh. Obviously you know nothing about farming.

And no, a cow being slaughtered for beef can't make milk after it's been slaughtered.

And you get either milk OR cheese from the yield.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #27 on: July 06, 2018, 10:24:24 am »
There's plenty of selection (albeit mediocre supermarket cheese from back home), at least in Seoul.

As for price and selection: Welcome to being an immigrant. The locals like different food, and stuff has to be imported and domestic agriculture (on much less arable land), is dedicated to products serving the local market.
nothing says serving the local market than selling home-grown watermelons for 20,000won each. a lot of the local produce is just as much of a rip-off as the imported stuff.

Pickup truck guy where I live is selling them at 5000. Of course prices fluctuate- probably due to weather, season, supply, etc, and yes, middle men can be a factor.

Welcome to being an immigrant- your precious food from back home costs more.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #28 on: July 06, 2018, 10:30:31 am »
Where does Hanwoo come from Martin?

Where does Cheese come from Martin?

Dairy cows and beef cattle are not the same. Duh. Obviously you know nothing about farming.

And no, a cow being slaughtered for beef can't make milk after it's been slaughtered.

And you get either milk OR cheese from the yield.

Sorry, I'm a loser from back home teaching ABCs . Are you saying a beef cow can't produce milk? I thought all cows were capable of producing milk after birthing a calf? I suggest taking the milk before slaughtering the cow.

Does the cheese come straight out of the udder? How do they get the jalapenos in? Do they feed the cow chilies before milking?
Who is here in 2019?


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #29 on: July 06, 2018, 10:44:29 am »
Sorry, I'm a loser from back home teaching ABCs . Are you saying a beef cow can't produce milk? I thought all cows were capable of producing milk after birthing a calf? I suggest taking the milk before slaughtering the cow.

Does the cheese come straight out of the udder? How do they get the jalapenos in? Do they feed the cow chilies before milking?
There's beef cattle, which you raise for meat and are bred accordingly. With beef cattle, their focus is adding muscle and having tender meat. With dairy cattle, all their nutritional intake goes to producing milk, not muscle. Beef cattle are typically slaughtered at 2-3 years, not so with dairy.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #30 on: July 06, 2018, 10:47:07 am »
Sorry, I'm a loser from back home teaching ABCs . Are you saying a beef cow can't produce milk? I thought all cows were capable of producing milk after birthing a calf? I suggest taking the milk before slaughtering the cow.

Does the cheese come straight out of the udder? How do they get the jalapenos in? Do they feed the cow chilies before milking?
There's beef cattle, which you raise for meat and are bred accordingly. With beef cattle, their focus is adding muscle and having tender meat. With dairy cattle, all their nutritional intake goes to producing milk, not muscle. Beef cattle are typically slaughtered at 2-3 years, not so with dairy.

Now this is a man who knows his heifers.


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 3819

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #31 on: July 06, 2018, 10:47:18 am »
Sorry, I'm a loser from back home teaching ABCs . Are you saying a beef cow can't produce milk? I thought all cows were capable of producing milk after birthing a calf? I suggest taking the milk before slaughtering the cow.

Does the cheese come straight out of the udder? How do they get the jalapenos in? Do they feed the cow chilies before milking?
There's beef cattle, which you raise for meat and are bred accordingly. With beef cattle, their focus is adding muscle and having tender meat. With dairy cattle, all their nutritional intake goes to producing milk, not muscle. Beef cattle are typically slaughtered at 2-3 years, not so with dairy.
Once a cow stops giving milk, she often gets a career change as hamburger. Not high grade beef, but not wasted either.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #32 on: July 06, 2018, 10:51:52 am »
:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
Who else could be triggered and start fights in a 'Cheese' thread and a 'Weather' thread?
 :cheesy: :cheesy: :cheesy: :cheesy:

Drought and whining about food prices may be a big laugh to you. It's not to dairy farmers, to whom drought is catastrophic. Or do you think all that milk can be made just by feed corn and a single bucket of water?


  • oglop
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1843

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #33 on: July 06, 2018, 10:52:52 am »
There's plenty of selection (albeit mediocre supermarket cheese from back home), at least in Seoul.

As for price and selection: Welcome to being an immigrant. The locals like different food, and stuff has to be imported and domestic agriculture (on much less arable land), is dedicated to products serving the local market.
nothing says serving the local market than selling home-grown watermelons for 20,000won each. a lot of the local produce is just as much of a rip-off as the imported stuff.

Pickup truck guy where I live is selling them at 5000. Of course prices fluctuate- probably due to weather, season, supply, etc, and yes, middle men can be a factor.

Welcome to being an immigrant- your precious food from back home costs more.
well, yes, if you can catch him when he's about. most food has to be bought from a mart or market. most fruit, vegetables and meat here is, either way, a rip off. i don't think there's anyone here that can argue against that


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #34 on: July 06, 2018, 11:02:55 am »
Once a cow stops giving milk, she often gets a career change as hamburger. Not high grade beef, but not wasted either.
True. That can of Alpo has to come from somewhere.

But regardless, in response to the naysayers, Korea differentiates between its beef cattle and its dairy cows. Beef cattle are hanwoo for the most part and from what I've seen, it looks like the dairy cows are mostly Holsteins.

Korea is just not good cattle country. With so much of local grain production going to rice, which in turn means that it's consumed by humans, it means hay, sorghum, feed corn, etc. become that much more expensive. Add into that the terrain...there's a reason hawoo is so expensive and it is not all because of middlemen. Not to mention the climate...

For those who think otherwise, start your own farm where you can sell cheap hanwoo by cutting out the middleman.


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #35 on: July 06, 2018, 11:07:21 am »
Once a cow stops giving milk, she often gets a career change as hamburger. Not high grade beef, but not wasted either.
True. That can of Alpo has to come from somewhere.

But regardless, in response to the naysayers, Korea differentiates between its beef cattle and its dairy cows. Beef cattle are hanwoo for the most part and from what I've seen, it looks like the dairy cows are mostly Holsteins.

Korea is just not good cattle country. With so much of local grain production going to rice, which in turn means that it's consumed by humans, it means hay, sorghum, feed corn, etc. become that much more expensive. Add into that the terrain...there's a reason hawoo is so expensive and it is not all because of middlemen. Not to mention the climate...

For those who think otherwise, start your own farm where you can sell cheap hanwoo by cutting out the middleman.

Could you answer my jalapeno cheese question please. Once I receive an answer that will guide me on my whether I will start my own farm or not. Thanks mate.
Who is here in 2019?


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #36 on: July 06, 2018, 11:11:39 am »
well, yes, if you can catch him when he's about. most food has to be bought from a mart or market. most fruit, vegetables and meat here is, either way, a rip off. i don't think there's anyone here that can argue against that
While there might be some price bloat, I think people who complain about the prices really don't grasp the agricultural situation of South Korea, as well as it's import situation. You're talking about an incredibly dense country, one that is basically a step away from microstate levels. When you factor in arable land, it gets even worse. The only countries that exceed it in terms of density in relation to arable land are microstates and desert countries. Now add in South Korea's lack of natural resources.

The sheer scarcity of land means this is a problem for food prices.

Then you have to factor in Korea being relatively geographically isolated, and in effect, an island in terms of trade. Literally everything has to come in either by sea or by air. There is no rail line or highway to another country. There are no other countries right next door that you can rely on, like the way the Dutch can with Germany and France. The distances across the Pacific are substantially greater than the Atlantic as well. Additionally, the two closest countries, China and Japan, are also high-population countries, with Japan being in a near-identical situation to Korea.

The people who come from places where food is cheap and think things are overpriced? Canada, the United States, Australia. Countries that are at the bottom of the density in terms of arable land situation.

In effect, it's the equivalent of some hayseed from Kansas wondering why rent is so expensive in Manhattan.


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1402

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #37 on: July 06, 2018, 11:12:06 am »
well, yes, if you can catch him when he's about. most food has to be bought from a mart or market. most fruit, vegetables and meat here is, either way, a rip off. i don't think there's anyone here that can argue against that
While there might be some price bloat, I think people who complain about the prices really don't grasp the agricultural situation of South Korea, as well as it's import situation. You're talking about an incredibly dense country, one that is basically a step away from microstate levels. When you factor in arable land, it gets even worse. The only countries that exceed it in terms of density in relation to arable land are microstates and desert countries. Now add in South Korea's lack of natural resources.

The sheer scarcity of land means this is a problem for food prices.

Then you have to factor in Korea being relatively geographically isolated, and in effect, an island in terms of trade. Literally everything has to come in either by sea or by air. There is no rail line or highway to another country. There are no other countries right next door that you can rely on, like the way the Dutch can with Germany and France. The distances across the Pacific are substantially greater than the Atlantic as well. Additionally, the two closest countries, China and Japan, are also high-population countries, with Japan being in a near-identical situation to Korea.

The people who come from places where food is cheap and think things are overpriced? Canada, the United States, Australia. Countries that are at the bottom of the density in terms of arable land situation.

In effect, it's the equivalent of some hayseed from Kansas wondering why rent is so expensive in Manhattan.
There's plenty of selection (albeit mediocre supermarket cheese from back home), at least in Seoul.

As for price and selection: Welcome to being an immigrant. The locals like different food, and stuff has to be imported and domestic agriculture (on much less arable land), is dedicated to products serving the local market.




well, yes, if you can catch him when he's about. most food has to be bought from a mart or market. most fruit, vegetables and meat here is, either way, a rip off. i don't think there's anyone here that can argue against that
While there might be some price bloat, I think people who complain about the prices really don't grasp the agricultural situation of South Korea, as well as it's import situation. You're talking about an incredibly dense country, one that is basically a step away from microstate levels. When you factor in arable land, it gets even worse. The only countries that exceed it in terms of density in relation to arable land are microstates and desert countries. Now add in South Korea's lack of natural resources.

The sheer scarcity of land means this is a problem for food prices.

Then you have to factor in Korea being relatively geographically isolated, and in effect, an island in terms of trade. Literally everything has to come in either by sea or by air. There is no rail line or highway to another country. There are no other countries right next door that you can rely on, like the way the Dutch can with Germany and France. The distances across the Pacific are substantially greater than the Atlantic as well. Additionally, the two closest countries, China and Japan, are also high-population countries, with Japan being in a near-identical situation to Korea.

The people who come from places where food is cheap and think things are overpriced? Canada, the United States, Australia. Countries that are at the bottom of the density in terms of arable land situation.

In effect, it's the equivalent of some hayseed from Kansas wondering why rent is so expensive in Manhattan.

Dude Korea has one of the most protectionist economies in the world. It's not like there isn't anything they can do about it. They can lower their tariffs and put in limits on middlemen mark ups. It's not rocket science.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2018, 11:15:30 am by thunderlips »


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #38 on: July 06, 2018, 11:16:13 am »
Could you answer my jalapeno cheese question please. Once I receive an answer that will guide me on my whether I will start my own farm or not. Thanks mate.
Are you looking at a hobby farm or industrial scale? For a hobby farm, when you make your homemade cheese, you can simply dice up and mix in some jalapeenies from a jar you buy at E-mart.

For industrial scale, you'll have to source jalapenos- either grown domestically or imported. Then you'll have to process them and your cheese product, have some sort of inspection and quality control, and then make sure to package and distribute them.

Good luck on your dairy farm- And remember, don't bother watching where you step. Just get some good boots and a boot scrape by your front door. 


Re: South Koreans develop a taste for cheese
« Reply #39 on: July 06, 2018, 11:17:19 am »
well, yes, if you can catch him when he's about. most food has to be bought from a mart or market. most fruit, vegetables and meat here is, either way, a rip off. i don't think there's anyone here that can argue against that
While there might be some price bloat, I think people who complain about the prices really don't grasp the agricultural situation of South Korea, as well as it's import situation. You're talking about an incredibly dense country, one that is basically a step away from microstate levels. When you factor in arable land, it gets even worse. The only countries that exceed it in terms of density in relation to arable land are microstates and desert countries. Now add in South Korea's lack of natural resources.

The sheer scarcity of land means this is a problem for food prices.

Then you have to factor in Korea being relatively geographically isolated, and in effect, an island in terms of trade. Literally everything has to come in either by sea or by air. There is no rail line or highway to another country. There are no other countries right next door that you can rely on, like the way the Dutch can with Germany and France. The distances across the Pacific are substantially greater than the Atlantic as well. Additionally, the two closest countries, China and Japan, are also high-population countries, with Japan being in a near-identical situation to Korea.

The people who come from places where food is cheap and think things are overpriced? Canada, the United States, Australia. Countries that are at the bottom of the density in terms of arable land situation.

In effect, it's the equivalent of some hayseed from Kansas wondering why rent is so expensive in Manhattan.


I finally understand the reason that Hanwoo is so expensive is because it is being imported by sea and air. That must be why the Australlian and American beef is cheaper. They must be able to swim here unlike the Hanwoo cows. Thanks Martin.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2018, 11:24:33 am by AvecPommesFrites »
Who is here in 2019?