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  • sheila
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 1480

    • November 23, 2009, 08:32:58 am
    • Gangnamgu, Seoul
Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« on: April 12, 2018, 10:53:25 am »
This is a thread for any lesson material for 동아출판 Middle School English 1 Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories. Please share your contributions here. Be sure to explain exactly what you are posting and please do not post multi-level materials in this thread. Also, any review lessons or materials should be posted in the review section for this grade. If you can't find what you're looking for here, check out the older edition of the book for similar materials. Best of luck in your lesson planning!
« Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 07:49:31 am by sheila »
Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard!
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  • emcee
  • Adventurer

    • 45

    • November 21, 2016, 08:00:56 am
    • Korea
Re: Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2018, 09:41:32 am »
Hey everyone, here's my lesson for Lesson 3, part 1.

It's pretty basic, I warm up the class with a few riddles and word puzzles. Then we review the language for the day, and quickly practice using the PPT. Next we move onto book work, where we do exercise A, and C, from pages 44, and 45. Finally we have a production activity.

For the final activity, Students will mingle and play rock, paper, scissors. The loser of the game will have to preform the asked favor. The first student to complete the sheet will then share in front of the class, and have the students that lost preform the favor in front of the class. Obviously t's up to you if you want to have the students preform in front of the class, as some students will probably be uncomfortable with it.

Hope you guys enjoy :)


  • sh9wntm
  • Veteran

    • 198

    • February 23, 2018, 03:23:39 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2018, 11:57:24 am »
Here is my PPT for the first lesson. Should be pretty self explanatory. I used some adventure time characters to help us with conversation.  :afro:


  • esorgi
  • Newgookin

    • 4

    • August 23, 2016, 04:14:33 pm
    • Busan
Re: Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2018, 02:23:43 pm »
Unit 3 Lesson 1~

Pretty basic:
-Riddle
-Scrambled vocabulary
-Reviewing/practicing key expressions
-Group game (credit goes to another waygook from another textbook thread)


  • sh9wntm
  • Veteran

    • 198

    • February 23, 2018, 03:23:39 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2018, 01:53:40 pm »
Here's a simple four corners game. If you are unfamiliar with four corners, you have signs for corners A,B,C,D around the room. You give the kids maybe 20 seconds to pick a corner. When everyone has a corner, have them speak out the expressions assigned to their corner all together. Then you drop the bomb. If there's a bomb in your corner, you are out and you sit down. The winners are the last ones standing.


  • sh9wntm
  • Veteran

    • 198

    • February 23, 2018, 03:23:39 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2018, 10:55:27 am »
Here's what I have for lesson 2. The lesson is on giving advice to problems. The expressions from the last class are built upon with "why don't you _______?". The structure is similar to last class.

For a partner activity, I have a simple fill in the blank worksheet. When they are done I have them practice the dialogue with each other. Then I might have some partners present it to the class.

This time I have a fly swatter game added to the ppt. The word doc is the teacher's sheet for what you say (don't show). The game is probably good for at least 15 minutes, possibly longer.



Re: Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2018, 03:26:31 pm »
 ;D good


  • kuitair
  • Waygookin

    • 17

    • September 03, 2017, 07:30:19 am
    • 경남 사천시 동서금동
Re: Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2018, 05:54:28 pm »
I played this modified version of Mystery Box (the template comes from a different game already created and uploaded unto the website.

Students are put into teams. One student chooses a letter and the team will read the question.
(Click the slide for the potential answers.)
If the student can do the challenge, the student will read the answer in white, "Sure, I can."
If not, then the student can read the answer in yellow and refer someone else from their group to complete the challenge, "Sorry, but I can't. Why don't you ask ..."
If either of them successfully complete the task, then they get to choose whether or not to keep or give the point (not know whether the points are positive or negative).

This was just meant to be a fun way to practice the function at the beginning of the lesson through reading out loud and speaking.

(You will need sheets of paper for the paper airplane challenge and the paper crane challenge)


  • granty451
  • Waygookin

    • 19

    • February 23, 2017, 08:24:38 pm
    • Sejong
Re: Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2018, 02:53:24 pm »
Here's my stuff :)

Removed. Check out K_orshare.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2018, 08:42:37 am by granty451 »


  • roisin171
  • Adventurer

    • 32

    • February 12, 2019, 01:18:23 am
    • Daegu
Re: Lesson 3: Wisdom in Stories
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2019, 12:08:43 pm »
Here is my take on Chapter 3.

I've combined my lesson with some of the others here as they were just what I wanted to say, but I didn't know how. I also gave the students examples of polite and impolite favors and got them to tell me if it was polite or not. They then told me how I could make it polite if it wasn't.
For the word action game, I got the groups to pick a number as they are mixed levels. For the bonus, depending on how fast the students were, I did one or 2 challenges. I wrote the shapes and actions (minus the bonus ones) on the board to help the students remember.

I took sh9wntm's version of 4 corners and edited it. Sometimes we didn't get to play a lot of this. I just used it as a filler more for the end of the lesson. I printed out letters and stuck them to the corners (attached). I got the students to repeat the phrases in their corners so they can use the TL again.