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Risk Game - Cultural Taboos
« on: October 31, 2017, 08:43:48 am »
I'm teaching an afterschool class and this was one of my lessons. I used the World Domination game from user Dengar as a basis. 

Here's that thread http://www.waygook.org/index.php?topic=89201.0

So what I do is use this game to teach, rather than just as a review. There should be three teams (red, blue, yellow) and they all pick one starting position.

>based on Risk, they can expand to one other unoccupied country without fighting anyone.
>when they expand, they must read the slide for that country out loud (click the country's name to jump to that country's slide)

>if a team wants to attack another, they must Rock Paper Scissors for it. The attacker must then recite one taboo or custom about the country to gain that country. If they're the defender, they just have to win RPS to keep the country.
>continue until one country dominates the whole map, or until the time allotted for the game is up (team with the most countries wins)

***side note: this is just meant to be a fun and cursory lesson, introducing the concept of differences in cultures. I'm sure the facts don't perfectly represent these societies. I really don't care to hear why the facts are problematic. Just change them if you don't like them.***
« Last Edit: November 21, 2017, 10:02:13 am by GregoryTeacher »


  • AshCha
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    • September 04, 2021, 10:25:19 pm
Re: Risk Game - Cultural Taboos
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2022, 02:48:17 pm »
I really really like this one! It's a great game to teach the kids something whilst also having fun together at the end of the year.

I changed a few things in my one:\
  • Firstly, I changed the fonts and stuff to make it more interesting.
  • Secondly, I added a slide introducing the concepts.
  • I removed the negative stuff about Venezuela and South Africa. It seemed too political for me.
  • Changed the stuff about Vietnam (my Vietnamese friend said they were wrong).
  • Removed the thing about 'kibun' in Korea (my co-teacher didn't get it and neither did I).
  • I also changed a few things just based on things I know that I thought the students would find interesting.

I found I had to write the Korean translations for 'Custom' (관습)), 'Superstition' (미신) and 'Tradition' (전통) on the white board during the 'Other Cultures' slide, and it still helped to have my co-teacher go over it in Korean. Still, I think it was important for getting them ready for the game as I spent the whole lesson doing this.

Overall, a great idea! And my lessons doing it went very swimmingly. Thank you!!


(P.S. the fonts won't work on Google Drive - you'll have to download and open in Powerpoint)

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1U5n70ZtwHw7eDjjAH_drGyKS6sbQVVvI/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=107398695361219127270&rtpof=true&sd=true
« Last Edit: January 03, 2022, 02:56:42 pm by AshCha »


Re: Risk Game - Cultural Taboos
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2022, 09:41:57 am »
I really really like this one! It's a great game to teach the kids something whilst also having fun together at the end of the year.

I changed a few things in my one:\
  • Removed the thing about 'kibun' in Korea (my co-teacher didn't get it and neither did I).
https://www.korea4expats.com/article-nunchi-kibun-values-norms-korea.html
Sometimes kibun is translated as feeling/mood, but kibun is like your sense of well-being/dignity/face/pride. To have good kibun, one must show appropriate respect and such.

Korean folks would probably understand it better if written as "기분(氣分)".


  • AshCha
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    • September 04, 2021, 10:25:19 pm
Re: Risk Game - Cultural Taboos
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2022, 10:43:48 pm »
https://www.korea4expats.com/article-nunchi-kibun-values-norms-korea.html
Sometimes kibun is translated as feeling/mood, but kibun is like your sense of well-being/dignity/face/pride. To have good kibun, one must show appropriate respect and such.

Korean folks would probably understand it better if written as "기분(氣分)".

I know about the word kibun, as did (I'm assuming) my Korean co-teacher. But the way it was phrased in the original ppt ('Keep the kibun of the room') had us both at a loss.

Either way two things was enough for the Korea slide, I found, considering the fact that whatever you put the kids would already know it anyway.