Read 9201 times

  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #40 on: September 15, 2017, 04:45:12 pm »
In the past 4 years, they have all been wonderful, minus one temporary teacher.

All have taken the lead and recognise that I am available as a resource and to help with the class.  Each one has had their own unique way in which to conduct the class, so being able to "shift gears" has made it easy.

Once trust has been developed and a "routine" established, it's been a breeze (some fear being corrected or put on the spot in front of others, but I have NOT and would NEVER).


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 4338

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #41 on: September 15, 2017, 05:11:51 pm »
the worst part of being employed in a public school was having to teach alongside someone. what a waste of resources and time, for everyone

lessons were 100% more effective in my final year at public school when i had no co-teacher


Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #42 on: September 16, 2017, 07:58:29 am »
the worst part of being employed in a public school was having to teach alongside someone. what a waste of resources and time, for everyone

lessons were 100% more effective in my final year at public school when i had no co-teacher
It's not just PS who employ co-teachers. My private intl sch also employs co-teachers. The reason for employing them is simple. They are cost effective for the school since they are local hires. They can also translate immediately if students really do not understand something that the native teacher has said ( I know it is better if they can understand directly but sometimes it's easier for the co-teacher to translate.)  But anyway, you seem to do these co-teachers down as though they are useless when they probably have a degree in a subject and are smarter than you.


  • CJ
  • Super Waygook

    • 463

    • November 15, 2010, 08:11:00 am
    • Down south
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #43 on: September 18, 2017, 07:44:50 am »
the worst part of being employed in a public school was having to teach alongside someone. what a waste of resources and time, for everyone

lessons were 100% more effective in my final year at public school when i had no co-teacher
It's not just PS who employ co-teachers. My private intl sch also employs co-teachers. The reason for employing them is simple. They are cost effective for the school since they are local hires. They can also translate immediately if students really do not understand something that the native teacher has said ( I know it is better if they can understand directly but sometimes it's easier for the co-teacher to translate.)  But anyway, you seem to do these co-teachers down as though they are useless when they probably have a degree in a subject and are smarter than you.

Classy.

By being "smarter" that means memorising by rote. Koreans tend to lecture, give massive amounts of homework and test. That doesn't mean they are smart.


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 4338

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #44 on: September 18, 2017, 09:17:13 am »
the worst part of being employed in a public school was having to teach alongside someone. what a waste of resources and time, for everyone

lessons were 100% more effective in my final year at public school when i had no co-teacher
It's not just PS who employ co-teachers. My private intl sch also employs co-teachers. The reason for employing them is simple. They are cost effective for the school since they are local hires. They can also translate immediately if students really do not understand something that the native teacher has said ( I know it is better if they can understand directly but sometimes it's easier for the co-teacher to translate.)  But anyway, you seem to do these co-teachers down as though they are useless when they probably have a degree in a subject and are smarter than you.
what part of my post did i state that i thought i was smarter than the co-teachers?


  • reifoo87
  • Veteran

    • 120

    • June 04, 2013, 02:10:55 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #45 on: September 18, 2017, 11:47:01 am »
even if they're staying there's no guarantee they will be teaching english next year.

who does what is usually decided about a week or two before the start of the new year, and it depends on what new teachers are coming in to the school.

any older/senior teachers always get first dibs. so you could end up with a 45 year old ajjumma who barely speaks a word of english but wants to teach it because she's lazy and just wants the NET to do everything. in that case your co-teacher will be assigned a homeroom teacher position.

Yeah, it's been like that in my other schools but I did double check and this school seems to be a little different. Even the current head of English has been at this school far longer than the usual maximum period allowed - I'm not sure why!


  • reifoo87
  • Veteran

    • 120

    • June 04, 2013, 02:10:55 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #46 on: September 18, 2017, 12:57:51 pm »
even if they're staying there's no guarantee they will be teaching english next year.

who does what is usually decided about a week or two before the start of the new year, and it depends on what new teachers are coming in to the school.

any older/senior teachers always get first dibs. so you could end up with a 45 year old ajjumma who barely speaks a word of english but wants to teach it because she's lazy and just wants the NET to do everything. in that case your co-teacher will be assigned a homeroom teacher position.

Yeah, it's been like that in my other schools but I did double check and this school seems to be a little different. Even the current head of English has been at this school far longer than the usual maximum period allowed - I'm not sure why!

It depends, that teacher can request to stay there longer if the P,VP and parents agree to it.  The maths teachers at my old middle school stayed for seven years doing that.  Or it could be a semi-private school where the teachers can stay for yonks.  In my city we have two boys schools, one is public and the other is semi-private.  Some teachers have been at that school for 15+ years.

Oh yeah I guess that's whats happening at my school. I'm sure my co-teacher (Head of English) mentioned she had been here for about seven years!


  • weirdgirlinkorea
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 2044

    • September 09, 2010, 06:00:18 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #47 on: September 18, 2017, 01:00:10 pm »
I don't have CoTs now (Thank god!) but...
First school (was there two years).
1) Handler: Hated the idea of NETs...thought they served no purpose, essentially looked down her nose at me. I tried to make nice with her but toward the end I gave up. Also, being a noob to Korea it was never explained to me that she was "in charge" of me. I didn't know 'handler' also meant boss. We never cotaught together. However, she did her job. She took me to immigration, explained everything clearly (except where the subway was but no one is perfect), always informed me of my camp dates and deadlines and vacation dates far, far in advance. She followed her job to the T and then some but she definitely needed a personality overhaul. She was always waiting to get rid of me. She didn't want NETs to renew. 5/10
2) This coteacher is now my best friend here in Korea. We were so in synch it was amazing. If all coteaching was like this, I wouldn't hate coteaching so much. 10/10 (p.s. handler didn't like our relationship, so I was never allowed to have my renewal open class with my friend because then they would have to renew me.
3)this one was a really nice human being, who really liked me but she was an old school teacher who was a horrible teacher and couldn't speak but 100 words of English. Should never had been an English teacher. Gratefully, she changed to another subject the following year. She would take me out for meals and music events, and even sometimes drive me home. I hear from my BFF that she still asks about me. 6/10
4) This one was pregnant when she came to coteach with me, and was experiencing temporary marital problems. She was never nasty to me, but she was hell on the kids. She definitely tried to share the classroom. I just felt uncomfortable with how she screamed at the kids. She is quite intelligent, loved discussing literature with me and was by far the most fluent in English. Also, she left after the first semester to give birth and I had no replacement so I had to teach alone and I loved it. 7/10
5) temporary (of sorts) coteacher, but really just a homeroom teacher helping out with two 5th grade classes. She would steal all my lesson material and plans, but I caught on quick and had two plans, the real one and the fake one. I gave her the fake one which was light on material and heavy on book work and one ppt riddled with mistakes that she never bothered to correct. She was lazy AH and the whole school didn't like her. She ended up losing her job when she got married and asked for a transfer to Daegu and the MOE said no because she had too many bad marks on her record.  :P 1/10
6) final coteacher was in cahoots with handler (they ended up being roommates later). She didn't like that I could teach without her. Felt I didn't know my place (as a human tape recorder) hated that the students listened and loved me. Overall she was petty and insecure. Thought she was better in English than she actually was. Always insisted on making some PPTs from scratch loaded with spelling and pronunciation mistakes. It wasn't until the end did she realize the results of her tattletelling behavior and then after I didn't get renewed she was like, I am so sorry. And then gave me candy and hand cream  :huh: 1/10

Second school-public but independent hire (city funded)
7)Main CoT made sure from the get go that I knew she was my boss. I was fine with that. But things went bad pretty quick when:
a) I wouldn't call her unni. She absolutely didn't want me calling her by her first name or Ms. _____. We hit a stalemate, so I never called her name at all lol
b) she didn't believe me that I really didn't know any foreign men I could set her up with (I really don't have any straight male friends). She thought I didn't want to set her up.
She was as crazy as batshit. Abusive as all get out...OUT OF THE CLASSROOM. But...
In the classroom she was AMAZING. I wondered why the hell I was there. She definitely didn't need me. She was a fantastic English teacher. She used English like 70% of the time, she shared every part of the lesson and classroom management with me. It was Jekyll and Hyde. Our classes were the most enjoyable part of my day. She also didn't want me to make any materials. Occasionally, she would ask me for some fresh stuff and I'd give it to her and she'd be thankful (she even used it for her open class) but outside the class she was cruel and stole my vacation days from me in NIES system and then eventually decided she hated me so much that I had to use NIES myself (even if I wasn't in school which was impossible since I owned a Mac and she knew it). Anyway, because of her I didn't renew only to find out it was time for her to rotate out. Apparently ppl all knew she was unpleasant and the VP loved me which is how I got my current job. 7/10 (as a funny side note, she got a bf second semester and she became a little more tolerable...a little.)
8)Contract teacher at same school. A really nice person but terrible at coteaching. She didn't want to share the class at all. She wasn't really good at English but would not utilize me at all except for the occasional "can you say these words for the students?" She was excellent at class management but most her lessons were boring AH. But she would help me with anything. And generally be kind to me OUTSIDE OF THE CLASS. Did camp with her and she was required to let me plan and lead it and then we did really well together.  6/10
Overall coteaching experience 2/10 Will never ever do it again. High school is Da Bomb.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2017, 12:55:31 pm by travelinpantsgirl »
Ignoranţa este adesea o boală fatal şi cretin nu poate fi vindecata.


  • Maclean
  • Veteran

    • 249

    • July 04, 2017, 10:35:58 am
    • Korea
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #48 on: September 19, 2017, 12:34:35 pm »
Last year I had one co-teacher at my second school. We barely exchanged one word all year. I would teach and he would stand at the back of the class doing his ajoshi stretches. You know the ones where he puts his arms straight out then does the knee bend crunches thing. Very annoying.

Couldn't rate him as a teacher though as he never did anything.

Honestly, what's with K folk doing annoying stretches in seemingly inappropriate places? Like aisles of airplanes for &^#@! sake? Or when you're sitting on the subway and an ajjoshi gets on and stands in front of you. In what alternative universe does one decide that that's the ideal time and place to do ones pelvic twist exercises? :laugh:

As for the teacher I would try to position myself so that I wouldn't have to look at him while he did his ajoshi yoga instead of his job.

And he was only about thirty years old. He'd go down (arms straight out in front) then up, occasionally snort, then repeat another fifty times. All the while wearing the most effete pastel cardigans and matching pants.

Sigh. The things I must endure to make a living.


  • Cyanea
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1368

    • September 04, 2016, 01:48:24 pm
    • Las Vegas
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #49 on: September 20, 2017, 11:41:30 pm »
It wasn't until the end did she realize the results of her tattletelling behavior and then after I didn't get renewed she was like, I am so sorry. And then gave me candy and hand cream  :huh: 1/10

The main flaw in the system is that the foreigner is completely at the mercy of the nearest Korean.

In Korea everything is done on politics, nothing on merit.

Being amazing at your job is more likely to get you non-renewed than being mediocre, because you create jealousy.
Catch my drift?


  • CJ
  • Super Waygook

    • 463

    • November 15, 2010, 08:11:00 am
    • Down south
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #50 on: September 21, 2017, 07:20:29 am »
It wasn't until the end did she realize the results of her tattletelling behavior and then after I didn't get renewed she was like, I am so sorry. And then gave me candy and hand cream  :huh: 1/10

The main flaw in the system is that the foreigner is completely at the mercy of the nearest Korean.

In Korea everything is done on politics, nothing on merit.

Being amazing at your job is more likely to get you non-renewed than being mediocre, because you create jealousy.

Yes, I agree. For those of us with experience in other countries where you actually have to teach, rather than entertain, outshining the Korean teachers is a piece of cake. Unfortunatley, the old teacher doesn't like playing second fiddle to me and I'll be a little worried about her comments when I ask for a transfer next contract. Despite the fact I get on well with the head teacher, age trumps everything here so I just hope they don't listen to her too much. 


  • weirdgirlinkorea
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 2044

    • September 09, 2010, 06:00:18 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #51 on: September 21, 2017, 07:59:51 am »
Pathetically true. Especially in elementary. Also discovered they don't like learning that you have more education than them (the CTs) or that you're older. I have always been older than everyone I worked with in elementary except two. The jealousy is friggin' ridiculous because WE are aware we do not have the same job as them, but they seem to miss that detail completely.
It wasn't until the end did she realize the results of her tattletelling behavior and then after I didn't get renewed she was like, I am so sorry. And then gave me candy and hand cream  :huh: 1/10

The main flaw in the system is that the foreigner is completely at the mercy of the nearest Korean.

In Korea everything is done on politics, nothing on merit.

Being amazing at your job is more likely to get you non-renewed than being mediocre, because you create jealousy.
Ignoranţa este adesea o boală fatal şi cretin nu poate fi vindecata.


  • Maclean
  • Veteran

    • 249

    • July 04, 2017, 10:35:58 am
    • Korea
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #52 on: September 21, 2017, 09:55:36 am »
That avatar of yours. On behalf of all waygook members can I ask that you change it.  Pressing the 'escape' button on my keyboard does nothing. Nothing I tell you. Nothing! The guy just keeps dancing and being nauseating.

Talk about a 'punchable' face.   >:(

Surely that avatar must violate the terms of use on this site. It must. In a just world how could it not?


  • zola
  • The Legend

    • 2917

    • September 30, 2012, 06:56:11 am
    • Korea
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #53 on: September 21, 2017, 10:06:26 am »
Punchable is an understatement.

But i think it's a lady.
Kpip! - Martin 2018


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 4338

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #54 on: September 21, 2017, 10:07:46 am »
i use adblock and right clicked it -> hide this


Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #55 on: September 21, 2017, 10:35:46 am »
I think the biggest problem is the apparent lack of communication between our employer (office of education of whichever place) and the actual schools.

Is there any communication at all?

I think problems stem right from the beginning with NETs entering a school with the idea that they are an assisant teacher (this is true), while the KETs might not even realise that's the case.  So you end up with someone with potentially no experience standing at the front trying to teach, while someone with ten,fifteen, twenty years plus experience sits at the back and doesn't say a word.  It's mind blowing that this is allowed to happen.

But I also kind of feel for KETs.  They never asked to be lumbered with us (I'm using that word because it often feels like it) and if they get no direction from the office of education then how do they know what is expected of them?

I look back to working in an office in my home country and sometimes we would have people on work experience or people from other departments "helping" us.  I always hated it because it meant I had to do my own job as well as finding work for these new people too.  I never needed help because I knew exactly how to do my job; honestly the "helpers" were more of a hindrance.  Perhaps many KETs feel this way.


  • CJ
  • Super Waygook

    • 463

    • November 15, 2010, 08:11:00 am
    • Down south
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #56 on: September 21, 2017, 10:55:56 am »
I think the biggest problem is the apparent lack of communication between our employer (office of education of whichever place) and the actual schools.

Is there any communication at all?

I think problems stem right from the beginning with NETs entering a school with the idea that they are an assisant teacher (this is true), while the KETs might not even realise that's the case.  So you end up with someone with potentially no experience standing at the front trying to teach, while someone with ten,fifteen, twenty years plus experience sits at the back and doesn't say a word.  It's mind blowing that this is allowed to happen.

But I also kind of feel for KETs.  They never asked to be lumbered with us (I'm using that word because it often feels like it) and if they get no direction from the office of education then how do they know what is expected of them?

I look back to working in an office in my home country and sometimes we would have people on work experience or people from other departments "helping" us.  I always hated it because it meant I had to do my own job as well as finding work for these new people too.  I never needed help because I knew exactly how to do my job; honestly the "helpers" were more of a hindrance.  Perhaps many KETs feel this way.

I think that the majority of KETs don't want us here because it's a loss of face for them in the fact that, in the eyes of the government, they can't do their job properly so they need "help" from us. As a result, they hire mostly young and inexperienced "fun" teachers who have no idea what they're doing, while the KT sits and watches (or sleeps) the show.

However, what is worse is when an experienced teacher starts outshining the KT. This can lead to hostility and jealousy. On the odd occassion, you'll get an open-minded KT who actually watches what the NET does and appreciates the new teaching method. For instance, my head teacher respects what I do, but the old teacher hates it because the students respond well and it makes her look bad.


  • weirdgirlinkorea
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 2044

    • September 09, 2010, 06:00:18 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #57 on: September 21, 2017, 12:16:02 pm »

I had a pyscho coteacher, but she was amazing in the classroom, she was open to new techniques and ideas, she was a sponge. She said she totally benefited from having partnered with a native teacher, in my opinion to the point she didn't really need a NET anymore.
On the opposite side of that I had a young (younger than me) barely experienced CT who was so jealous she would tattle on me after every class like a 4 year old. Even there was nothing to tell she would tattle because she felt inferior. She also thought her English was much better than it was, and she really resented my presence.


However, what is worse is when an experienced teacher starts outshining the KT. This can lead to hostility and jealousy. On the odd occassion, you'll get an open-minded KT who actually watches what the NET does and appreciates the new teaching method. For instance, my head teacher respects what I do, but the old teacher hates it because the students respond well and it makes her look bad.
Ignoranţa este adesea o boală fatal şi cretin nu poate fi vindecata.


Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #58 on: September 21, 2017, 02:08:54 pm »
I guess I have been super lucky. I have had 4 co-teachers and they have all been great.
First was for my first 2 months in EPIK, she was nice and I was just a basic helper and activity coordinator (Had only taught solo before so didn't know what was needed of me) which was fine for 6 classes a week.

When my first one left for a working vacation I got a young teacher and she was fresh out of school. I had been there longer so she just let me set the tone of how class went. We worked well together and collaborated often. She did have a bit of problems controlling the students sometimes, but got the hang of it later.

I have 2 coT at 2 diff schools. One is older and layed back. I just work on activities and a small opening and she does all the book stuff. Basic but gets the job done. The other school my coT is young (maybe2-3 yrs teaching). They asked her to "create a new curriculum around the book" and she is working really hard on it. We often work together to come up with ways how to teach topics and use the book a lot less. I can see our work has really payed off. I see a great improvement in the students, especially the super weak ones.

When I read some other responses and write this I think I really got lucky and hit the jackpot in working situations. Fingers crossed it keeps up for the next yr and 4 months! 8)




  • weirdgirlinkorea
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 2044

    • September 09, 2010, 06:00:18 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Rate your (korean) co-worker
« Reply #59 on: September 21, 2017, 02:11:13 pm »
It's a male Korean actor lol
Punchable is an understatement.

But i think it's a lady.
Ignoranţa este adesea o boală fatal şi cretin nu poate fi vindecata.