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  • tfung31
  • Veteran

    • 120

    • March 02, 2011, 10:59:20 am
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: English vs American
« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2011, 03:00:59 pm »
This lesson really should be called British vs American. English vs American implies that Americans don't speak English.


  • calliesaur
  • Waygookin

    • 10

    • August 23, 2011, 12:23:40 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: English vs American
« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2011, 10:46:06 am »
I can't seem to open the PPT... I think I might have an older version of PPT. Any chance you could try posting it as a different version?  THANKS!!!   :D


  • Alhayes
  • Newgookin

    • 3

    • September 30, 2011, 09:32:44 am
Re: English vs American
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2011, 08:43:36 pm »
Have been looking for something like this, thankyou!  :D


Re: English vs American
« Reply #23 on: October 04, 2011, 12:00:21 pm »
great lesson..


  • minamteacher
  • Expert Waygook

    • 728

    • October 05, 2010, 07:55:14 am
    • Incheon
    more
Re: English vs American
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2011, 07:39:35 am »
I can't seem to open the PPT... I think I might have an older version of PPT. Any chance you could try posting it as a different version?  THANKS!!!   :D

Try downloading the compatibility pack here http://waygook.org/index.php/topic,21281.0.html


  • ryanklls
  • Explorer

    • 8

    • July 15, 2010, 11:31:04 am
    • South Korea
Re: English vs American
« Reply #25 on: November 03, 2011, 02:46:32 pm »
Ah, thanks a load for this. Gave a lesson like this ages ago and was looking for something extra to add to it! Will use it for my grade 2 class


Re: English vs American
« Reply #26 on: November 03, 2011, 02:50:05 pm »
This lesson really should be called British vs American. English vs American implies that Americans don't speak English.

No I think the title English vs American title is perfect in its implication.


Re: English vs American
« Reply #27 on: November 03, 2011, 11:32:06 pm »
This is great. My students are slighty confused by some of the words.


Re: English vs American
« Reply #28 on: November 04, 2011, 01:14:23 pm »
Hoover - Vacuum.

I always mistake this one.  Hoover is an American vacuum cleaner company.


Re: English vs American
« Reply #29 on: November 04, 2011, 03:22:42 pm »
What about differences in verbal spellings such as the British "practise" v the American "practice", "spelt" v spelt or "realise" v "realize". 


  • Chicagohotdog
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1052

    • March 04, 2012, 12:25:31 pm
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
    more
Re: English vs American
« Reply #30 on: April 12, 2012, 07:37:36 am »
I haven't got through the whole thing, but just glancing at the original ppt, I noticed one thing.  Where I come from (Chicago) expressway does mean highway, but it more typically refers to an interstate than a highway.  And that tends to be a midwestern term more than a universally American term. 

Thinking of that though - now I want to do a lesson on midwestern-isms...Chicago has quite a few (Pop...fronchroom... yeah, we have a few...) 
Discount of up to $10 off of first order on iHerb.com ---> CHK096

$10 off of a Tour booked through Viator.com (You get $10 off and I'll get $10 off - that could be an airport ride): https://www.viator.com/raf/PDPOTBSYI

http://travelhacking.org/sammery-wants-you


  • petere
  • Newgookin

    • 2

    • April 12, 2012, 03:56:18 pm
    • Redditch, England
Re: English vs American
« Reply #31 on: April 12, 2012, 05:04:39 pm »
Words pronounced the same are not spelt the same, e.g. Colour and color.

A lot of slang is introduced into language now which makes matters worse in understanding some conversations, but with far more Eastern countries being westernised, and a lot of what they pick up and see is from American movies. As a consequence of more Eastern population integration, europe is slowly being Americanised as well.

Who dressed up on Halloween 20 years ago knocking on doors to get sweets. It's a big thing in Britain now, something Americans have done for many decades.


Re: English vs American
« Reply #32 on: April 12, 2012, 06:47:13 pm »
I'm from South Africa and use British English. It really helps the kids understand different accents of English when the textbook listening activities are in American English and I speak with another accent. They were confused at first but now realise there are other types of English!


  • wongv
  • Waygookin

    • 14

    • March 08, 2012, 11:40:46 am
    • korea, Waegwan
Re: English vs American
« Reply #33 on: April 13, 2012, 07:57:48 am »
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.


  • kps1
  • Expert Waygook

    • 637

    • June 04, 2010, 08:20:13 am
    • South Korea
Re: English vs American
« Reply #34 on: April 13, 2012, 02:37:22 pm »
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.

That's because they hire more Americans. The majority of the time they find it easier to understand our monotone accents. Also, as an American I think saying "zee" instead of "zed" makes more sense. To me that'd be as weird as saying," oh thats not bee that's bed."


  • SpaceRook
  • Expert Waygook

    • 814

    • November 18, 2010, 11:54:36 am
    • South Korea
Re: English vs American
« Reply #35 on: April 14, 2012, 02:51:31 pm »
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.

That's because America invented English.


  • mccall
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • November 20, 2011, 04:31:51 pm
    • Masan
Re: English vs American
« Reply #36 on: April 15, 2012, 09:15:43 pm »
great subject matter, thanks for all the posts. As an extra to all this, you might also mention that in Canada, just north of the border, we use British spelling and  different slang than Americans. Just food for thought.


  • dhko2809
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • March 23, 2011, 10:08:33 am
    • Korea
Re: English vs American
« Reply #37 on: April 19, 2012, 09:54:40 am »
Needed a lesson like this to show the differences~ There is more to English than just American English  ;D


  • dapto1
  • Veteran

    • 173

    • August 08, 2011, 01:19:12 am
    • Incheon
Re: English vs American
« Reply #38 on: April 19, 2012, 01:11:01 pm »
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.

Isn't American English what is on the state exams here? I heard from a co-teacher that students are marked wrong if they use the British English version. If this is the case, people should be careful about ONLY teaching British English.


  • tfung31
  • Veteran

    • 120

    • March 02, 2011, 10:59:20 am
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: English vs American
« Reply #39 on: April 20, 2012, 08:43:43 am »
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.

Isn't American English what is on the state exams here? I heard from a co-teacher that students are marked wrong if they use the British English version. If this is the case, people should be careful about ONLY teaching British English.

Good point! American style high five! (it's a high five with an American flag in the other hand)