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  • viennica
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    • March 12, 2013, 04:02:28 pm
    • Gunpo
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Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« on: May 26, 2017, 01:39:58 pm »
Hi everyone,

There have been a lot of rumors and whispers about Moon Jae-In's administration being against keeping the foreign English programs afloat. Plenty of posts in the Waygook forums are saying to enjoy your jobs while you have them, and to start looking for your next move. It's a constant ominous rumble of, "Your days are numbered, expats."

Trouble is, each person who says things like this is unable to provide any type of link or source for their claims. It's a lot of fear-mongering and no hard evidence. I've done extensive research on this, both in English and Korean, on Google and in Naver. Nothing has turned up a stance on the future of us NETs. From what I've gathered in his campaign promises, Moon Jae In is looking to "hire more teachers," but from the context that most likely doesn't extend to us. So I'm at a loss here.

See, I'm considering earning my Master's online while here in the hopes of teaching at a university. I won't invest thousands of dollars into doing so if we're all going to be cut within the next couple of years. There are other countries I could go if I had to take my show on the road, but my Bachelor's is already in English and would be sufficient for most jobs.

Have any of you heard his actual plans? If you could provide any insight so I can make my next move, that would be wonderful of you.
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Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2017, 01:43:49 pm »
At my university there were strong rumours every summer that they were going to secretly bulldoze our worst, filthiest but most beloved accommodation. Supposedly the rumours had been going for about 30 years.

Wouldn't read too much into people panicking about us being deported en masse on here.


  • maximmm
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1447

    • September 05, 2013, 11:02:44 am
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2017, 02:21:12 pm »
Hi everyone,

There have been a lot of rumors and whispers about Moon Jae-In's administration being against keeping the foreign English programs afloat. Plenty of posts in the Waygook forums are saying to enjoy your jobs while you have them, and to start looking for your next move. It's a constant ominous rumble of, "Your days are numbered, expats."

Trouble is, each person who says things like this is unable to provide any type of link or source for their claims. It's a lot of fear-mongering and no hard evidence. I've done extensive research on this, both in English and Korean, on Google and in Naver. Nothing has turned up a stance on the future of us NETs. From what I've gathered in his campaign promises, Moon Jae In is looking to "hire more teachers," but from the context that most likely doesn't extend to us. So I'm at a loss here.

See, I'm considering earning my Master's online while here in the hopes of teaching at a university. I won't invest thousands of dollars into doing so if we're all going to be cut within the next couple of years. There are other countries I could go if I had to take my show on the road, but my Bachelor's is already in English and would be sufficient for most jobs.

Have any of you heard his actual plans? If you could provide any insight so I can make my next move, that would be wonderful of you.

I'm too lazy to search for the link - but there was a story detailing the campaign pledges of different candidates and Moon's pledges weren't particularly supportive of English being taught in schools.  He wasn't against NETs, but English subject in general.  Furthermore, there is another story which says that he wants to seriously cut down on the number of contract employees in the public sector.  We are contract employees in the public sector. 

As for uni - haven't you been reading the most recent requirements for uni teaching?  They want you to already have a few years of uni teaching experience here when you apply for the job.  You won't qualify even if you do get a master's degree without the said experience. 


  • Epistemology
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1904

    • September 19, 2010, 01:57:27 pm
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Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2017, 02:27:35 pm »
Most rumors stem from his stance during the 2012 election, where English education was a much bigger issue than it is now. It should be noted that PGH wholesale lifted his stance and adopted it as her own in order to swing left a bit. Most of it therefore has already been implemented (price caps on English Hagwons, banning of English Kindergartens, reductions in NETs)

Whether this continues remains to be seen. Its incredibly hard to discern this time around as it really was a non issue in an election dominated by NK.

What should be noted though is that the economic proposals put forward by the Minjoo party in Moon's manifesto are deeply unrealistic and in lieu of tax increases, cuts will have to be made elsewhere to balance the budget if those policies are enacted. Creating 90,000 more (mostly) government jobs, hiring more regular teachers when student numbers are crashing through the floor and forcing temporary Korean contract workers onto full time permanent contracts with all benefits and entitlements means money has to be pulled from somewhere else. the NET program is by far the most logical low hanging fruit to go after, as its what both Yongin and Incheon did when their budgets hit the fan due to their profligacy.
Away an bile yer heid ya numpty,ye dinnae ken whit yer talkin aboot.


  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2017, 03:31:21 pm »
Epi,

Your numbers are way off...not 90,000, but 810,000 (check it).

As for thinking one could get an MA and compete, know there are hundreds of well-qualified applicants for every single job opening at many of the best universities here.

I'm not trying to "dump" on the OP's goal or the idea of higher learning, but one needs to take a look at the long-term trend here.

The population is contracting, rapidly, schools from elementary, middle, high school, to higher education are closing.

Class sizes are getting smaller and smaller (we average 18), yet there are still many vacant classrooms in several schools, which equates to less and less opportunities, which increases the level of competition.

As for Moon, there most certainly is literature online about his groups goals and aims regarding English education.  In a nutshell, they want to level the playing field and dumb things down for all students.

No panic here.  It's just the way it is.

Some regional universities have actually eliminated their English departments all together, as they try to focus and specialize in other areas in the hopes to survive what will be an inevitable death for many of them that are no longer able to attract students.

Enjoy your weekend.


  • zola
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    • September 30, 2012, 06:56:11 am
    • Korea
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2017, 03:54:00 pm »
Most universities are projected in 2025 to have 50% of the number of Korean students as they had in 2015. They are scrambling to try to entice foreign students to make up the numbers.
Kpip! - Martin 2018


Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2017, 04:28:00 pm »
I think the "omg schools are shrinking to nothing" thing is really overblown when South Korea is one of the most densely populated countries on the planet, it has a huge population for its size, and there are big schools in every city and town that are bursting with students. Yes it's a graying population (like every developing country on the planet, skyrocketing costs of living and worse working conditions tend to do that) but there are still tons of kids here. South Korea NEEDS to reduce its population to something more manageable.


BUT I do expect Moon to cut things like EPIK, though PGH already cut a ton of EPIK jobs.

Keep in mind that if they do cut jobs, it will be at the last minute and with a lot of excuses, and they will hit everyone because Korean administrators don't want to actually have to evaluate English education. Also I guess because of the yearly budget schedule,  February contracts always seem to get cut a lot more than August contracts.
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Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2017, 08:18:57 pm »
There is a crackdown on E-2 visa holders working in after-school positions. Apparently all of the elementary schools contracted with after-school companies were warned by the government that they would be fined for employing E-2 visa holders. My elementary school principal decided to lay off the five teachers with E-2 visas. I've also heard reports of teachers being deported after government officials showed up on campus to check their visas.


Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2017, 07:44:48 am »
To OP there is a mega-thread about the end of native teachers going back as far as 2009. Each year the same scare tactics pop-up, each year it's the end.


Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2017, 09:10:46 am »
Hi everyone,

There have been a lot of rumors and whispers about Moon Jae-In's administration being against keeping the foreign English programs afloat. Plenty of posts in the Waygook forums are saying to enjoy your jobs while you have them, and to start looking for your next move. It's a constant ominous rumble of, "Your days are numbered, expats."

Trouble is, each person who says things like this is unable to provide any type of link or source for their claims. It's a lot of fear-mongering and no hard evidence. I've done extensive research on this, both in English and Korean, on Google and in Naver. Nothing has turned up a stance on the future of us NETs. From what I've gathered in his campaign promises, Moon Jae In is looking to "hire more teachers," but from the context that most likely doesn't extend to us. So I'm at a loss here.

See, I'm considering earning my Master's online while here in the hopes of teaching at a university. I won't invest thousands of dollars into doing so if we're all going to be cut within the next couple of years. There are other countries I could go if I had to take my show on the road, but my Bachelor's is already in English and would be sufficient for most jobs.

Have any of you heard his actual plans? If you could provide any insight so I can make my next move, that would be wonderful of you.

I'm too lazy to search for the link - but there was a story detailing the campaign pledges of different candidates and Moon's pledges weren't particularly supportive of English being taught in schools.  He wasn't against NETs, but English subject in general.  Furthermore, there is another story which says that he wants to seriously cut down on the number of contract employees in the public sector.  We are contract employees in the public sector. 

As for uni - haven't you been reading the most recent requirements for uni teaching?  They want you to already have a few years of uni teaching experience here when you apply for the job.  You won't qualify even if you do get a master's degree without the said experience. 


If you get the masters you can get a uni gig if you know someone or if you get lucky last minute at a place in the boonies.  Then you can get the experience and go somewhere else.  You are not hopeless but mass applying thru Dave's is pretty much hopeless I think. 
I am not a number. I am a free man.


  • Teemowork
  • Expert Waygook

    • 623

    • September 13, 2010, 08:21:30 am
    • South Korea
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2017, 10:37:28 am »
To OP there is a mega-thread about the end of native teachers going back as far as 2009. Each year the same scare tactics pop-up, each year it's the end.

So what you are saying is...

This is the same as NK making repeated threats to the South, warning them of drowning in a sea of destruction... yet like seven decades-ish later... same old same old?

It does make some sense, but even if the public sector chose to eliminate the jobs, I don't see how the government could control what the private sector does.  More English still makes the country a bit more tourist friendly which rakes in more money. 

For most other countries, even if English is not the main language, the citizens have the ability to use English while traveling abroad.  It's indeed the international language.  Whether Koreans like it or not, it's not going anywhere anytime soon.  Killing English education isn't going to be without its drawbacks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9yrvRc3j-M

At least in Japan, basically every non-Japanese looking person, seems to have at least some English ability, even if its not their first language.  Basically, if you know English, you open a pretty big communication channel with the rest of the world.  Skip it, and you could still live your own life pretty normally, but only your own country.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2017, 10:39:19 am by Teemowork »


  • cjszk
  • Expert Waygook

    • 894

    • August 23, 2013, 10:29:05 am
    • Seoul
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2017, 11:02:01 am »
To OP there is a mega-thread about the end of native teachers going back as far as 2009. Each year the same scare tactics pop-up, each year it's the end.
...
More English still makes the country a bit more tourist friendly which rakes in more money. ...
Basically, if you know English, you open a pretty big communication channel with the rest of the world.  Skip it, and you could still live your own life pretty normally, but only your own country.

To put things into different perspective- I am not disagreeing with you, however I am going to present a view that the Korean government officials may feel-

I don't think teaching Koreans English even more than to the extent they currently are at now will be beneficial enough at the tourism level more-so than it will ultimately cause Koreans to throw more money outside of their borders.

Yes it will empower Korean individual people to have more opportunity in their lives--- outside of Korea. Inside of Korea the only thing that will change is the standard of English education, not the opportunities as you will see the bar set higher but the amount of jobs still the same.

Teaching Koreans English in a way that makes individuals in Korea truly more global and international would result of many Koreans running away from "Hell Joseon." It would empower Koreans with the ability to buy more foreign brands than they already do and spend more money outside of Korea.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2017, 11:12:18 am by cjszk »


  • grey
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Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2017, 11:38:36 am »
To OP there is a mega-thread about the end of native teachers going back as far as 2009. Each year the same scare tactics pop-up, each year it's the end.
...
More English still makes the country a bit more tourist friendly which rakes in more money. ...
Basically, if you know English, you open a pretty big communication channel with the rest of the world.  Skip it, and you could still live your own life pretty normally, but only your own country.

To put things into different perspective- I am not disagreeing with you, however I am going to present a view that the Korean government officials may feel-

I don't think teaching Koreans English even more than to the extent they currently are at now will be beneficial enough at the tourism level more-so than it will ultimately cause Koreans to throw more money outside of their borders.

Yes it will empower Korean individual people to have more opportunity in their lives--- outside of Korea. Inside of Korea the only thing that will change is the standard of English education, not the opportunities as you will see the bar set higher but the amount of jobs still the same.

Teaching Koreans English in a way that makes individuals in Korea truly more global and international would result of many Koreans running away from "Hell Joseon." It would empower Koreans with the ability to buy more foreign brands than they already do and spend more money outside of Korea.

Maybe having a higher level of English makes a difference. If I try to put myself into that thought process I divide countries into two categories: English fluency or not English fluency. Maybe the person is really into stats and sees that Korea has jumped two spots in the rankings.

If I'm a tourist I'm looking what a country has to offer and look at logistics after. If they are a problem I choose a tour package. If I have a family and lots of things to deal with I'll be more likely to pay more money to have fewer things to worry about.

As been said 100XX times, Korean tourism will always be at a disadvantage if Japan and China exist, flights are measured in hours, and cost in the thousands of dollars.

In my estimation, Korea will only punch above its weight if it has a moment (which you could argue it's experiencing in Asia) or it reaches near English fluency in Seoul and is widely known.

On the world communication part-is there a desire to be interact and be compared logically with the rest of the world?
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  • iamsam
  • Veteran

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    • March 06, 2017, 07:56:05 am
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2017, 11:40:38 am »
To OP there is a mega-thread about the end of native teachers going back as far as 2009. Each year the same scare tactics pop-up, each year it's the end.
...
More English still makes the country a bit more tourist friendly which rakes in more money. ...
Basically, if you know English, you open a pretty big communication channel with the rest of the world.  Skip it, and you could still live your own life pretty normally, but only your own country.

To put things into different perspective- I am not disagreeing with you, however I am going to present a view that the Korean government officials may feel-

I don't think teaching Koreans English even more than to the extent they currently are at now will be beneficial enough at the tourism level more-so than it will ultimately cause Koreans to throw more money outside of their borders.

Yes it will empower Korean individual people to have more opportunity in their lives--- outside of Korea. Inside of Korea the only thing that will change is the standard of English education, not the opportunities as you will see the bar set higher but the amount of jobs still the same.

Teaching Koreans English in a way that makes individuals in Korea truly more global and international would result of many Koreans running away from "Hell Joseon." It would empower Koreans with the ability to buy more foreign brands than they already do and spend more money outside of Korea.

This.

The powers that be do not want all Koreans fluent in English.  That would give people the ability to receive information without it being filtered through the Korean translations.  Being able to search the internet and find alternatives to crap sold to them at outrageous prices because the family conglomerates have a stranglehold on all crevices of the society/commerce.  Plus, like already said, Koreans would be a more agile and mobile workforce which wouldn't be bound to living here do to language skills.  All these could hamper the economy and employment pool.  The status quo can't shift too much.  Probably why the gov't shutdown English kindergartens and only introduce English in the third grade(through shitty avenues as well), can't have the people actually achieving fluency.


  • Teemowork
  • Expert Waygook

    • 623

    • September 13, 2010, 08:21:30 am
    • South Korea
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2017, 11:54:01 am »
This.

The powers that be do not want all Koreans fluent in English.  That would give people the ability to receive information without it being filtered through the Korean translations.  Being able to search the internet and find alternatives to crap sold to them at outrageous prices because the family conglomerates have a stranglehold on all crevices of the society/commerce.  Plus, like already said, Koreans would be a more agile and mobile workforce which wouldn't be bound to living here do to language skills.  All these could hamper the economy and employment pool.  The status quo can't shift too much.  Probably why the gov't shutdown English kindergartens and only introduce English in the third grade(through shitty avenues as well), can't have the people actually achieving fluency.

I think that in the years of 2MB, he was REALLY enthusiastic about English.  He originally wanted to have ALL classes in public schools taught in English (except Korean), but so many educators and officials complained about how impossible it was to suddenly do that, he had to shift things to just a lot of foreign English programs.  It was basically impossible for Korean teachers to have that "level" of fluency to do all that, even at an elementary school level.

That's why, even when some people say there are "plenty" of capable and fluent public school English teachers out there (full time, not contract), I'm very skeptical.  If they really were so plentiful, then it shouldn't have been hard for all these teachers to be teaching all the subjects in English right?  Unless "plenty" has a different definition here.  There were probably massive objections because most (full time) Korean teachers DIDN'T have that fluency or capability to do so.  Even if they were to hire every single super fluent contract teacher, I don't even know if that'd be enough.


  • Epistemology
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1904

    • September 19, 2010, 01:57:27 pm
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Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2017, 11:59:10 am »
This.

The powers that be do not want all Koreans fluent in English.  That would give people the ability to receive information without it being filtered through the Korean translations.  Being able to search the internet and find alternatives to crap sold to them at outrageous prices because the family conglomerates have a stranglehold on all crevices of the society/commerce.  Plus, like already said, Koreans would be a more agile and mobile workforce which wouldn't be bound to living here do to language skills.  All these could hamper the economy and employment pool.  The status quo can't shift too much.  Probably why the gov't shutdown English kindergartens and only introduce English in the third grade(through shitty avenues as well), can't have the people actually achieving fluency.

I think that in the years of 2MB, he was REALLY enthusiastic about English.  He originally wanted to have ALL classes in public schools taught in English (except Korean), but so many educators and officials complained about how impossible it was to suddenly do that, he had to shift things to just a lot of foreign English programs.  It was basically impossible for Korean teachers to have that "level" of fluency to do all that, even at an elementary school level.

That's why, even when some people say there are "plenty" of capable and fluent public school English teachers out there (full time, not contract), I'm very skeptical.  If they really were so plentiful, then it shouldn't have been hard for all these teachers to be teaching all the subjects in English right?  Unless "plenty" has a different definition here.  There were probably massive objections because most (full time) Korean teachers DIDN'T have that fluency or capability to do so.  Even if they were to hire every single super fluent contract teacher, I don't even know if that'd be enough.

The thing about 2MB though is that he was an unapologetic globalist. a fairly rare specimen in Korean politics. Korean nationalists tend to despise him quite a bit as a result. PGH and Moon, in contrast, are nationalists from the right and left respectively.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2017, 12:02:21 pm by Epistemology »
Away an bile yer heid ya numpty,ye dinnae ken whit yer talkin aboot.


  • scpru
  • Veteran

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    • October 03, 2016, 09:46:41 am
    • Samcheonpo
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2017, 12:00:24 pm »

I think that in the years of 2MB, he was REALLY enthusiastic about English.  He originally wanted to have ALL classes in public schools taught in English (except Korean), but so many educators and officials complained about how impossible it was to suddenly do that, he had to shift things to just a lot of foreign English programs.  It was basically impossible for Korean teachers to have that "level" of fluency to do all that, even at an elementary school level.

That's why, even when some people say there are "plenty" of capable and fluent public school English teachers out there (full time, not contract), I'm very skeptical.  If they really were so plentiful, then it shouldn't have been hard for all these teachers to be teaching all the subjects in English right?  Unless "plenty" has a different definition here.  There were probably massive objections because most (full time) Korean teachers DIDN'T have that fluency or capability to do so.  Even if they were to hire every single super fluent contract teacher, I don't even know if that'd be enough.

From my own experience at my schools, I know for a fact only one school has the potential to suddenly teach in all English with the current staff. And even then, at least 3 teachers would have to go to English classes to try to advance before their lessons get into harder stuff.


  • Teemowork
  • Expert Waygook

    • 623

    • September 13, 2010, 08:21:30 am
    • South Korea
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2017, 12:04:17 pm »
To put things into different perspective- I am not disagreeing with you, however I am going to present a view that the Korean government officials may feel-

I don't think teaching Koreans English even more than to the extent they currently are at now will be beneficial enough at the tourism level more-so than it will ultimately cause Koreans to throw more money outside of their borders.

Yes it will empower Korean individual people to have more opportunity in their lives--- outside of Korea. Inside of Korea the only thing that will change is the standard of English education, not the opportunities as you will see the bar set higher but the amount of jobs still the same.

Teaching Koreans English in a way that makes individuals in Korea truly more global and international would result of many Koreans running away from "Hell Joseon." It would empower Koreans with the ability to buy more foreign brands than they already do and spend more money outside of Korea.

It's kind of weird how things spiraled so hard out of control.

An overwhelming number of company workers here use ZERO English in their daily work, yet an overwhelming number of companies still demand English test scores and certifications.

Japan has a lot of English programs in the public sector too, very similar to what Korea provides.  Private sector wise, they are on two different levels.  Korea just goes way HAM on that.  But when you talk about the company workers in Japan, they aren't spammed with requirements of needing silly English certifications just to do their job.  They didn't "spiral out of control" in the same respects.

Why did two countries with such similar starting education for foreign languages diverge so much?  Is it just me, or does Japan just have more logic than Korea?

Japan: "My company doesn't need English speaking workers, so I won't ask applicants for that."
Korea: "My company needs people, so every applicant's resume must be filled with mountains of BS, even if it's totally IRRELEVANT to the position!"

Japan: "We need an engineer.  Oh, you have experience with this, you know about this type of machine?  Great, you're hired!"
Korea: "Yes, yes, I know you are a qualified engineer, but...are you also an Olympic level archery marksman, completed military service, have the ability to chug 3 bottles of soju, do a standing backflip,  while having a PhD in a major totally unrelated to our company? No..?  Okay..... sorry.... I don't think this job is for you...."


  • Epistemology
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1904

    • September 19, 2010, 01:57:27 pm
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Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2017, 12:11:37 pm »
To put things into different perspective- I am not disagreeing with you, however I am going to present a view that the Korean government officials may feel-

I don't think teaching Koreans English even more than to the extent they currently are at now will be beneficial enough at the tourism level more-so than it will ultimately cause Koreans to throw more money outside of their borders.

Yes it will empower Korean individual people to have more opportunity in their lives--- outside of Korea. Inside of Korea the only thing that will change is the standard of English education, not the opportunities as you will see the bar set higher but the amount of jobs still the same.

Teaching Koreans English in a way that makes individuals in Korea truly more global and international would result of many Koreans running away from "Hell Joseon." It would empower Koreans with the ability to buy more foreign brands than they already do and spend more money outside of Korea.

It's kind of weird how things spiraled so hard out of control.

An overwhelming number of company workers here use ZERO English in their daily work, yet an overwhelming number of companies still demand English test scores and certifications.

Japan has a lot of English programs in the public sector too, very similar to what Korea provides.  Private sector wise, they are on two different levels.  Korea just goes way HAM on that.  But when you talk about the company workers in Japan, they aren't spammed with requirements of needing silly English certifications just to do their job.  They didn't "spiral out of control" in the same respects.

Why did two countries with such similar starting education for foreign languages diverge so much?  Is it just me, or does Japan just have more logic than Korea?

Japan: "My company doesn't need English speaking workers, so I won't ask applicants for that."
Korea: "My company needs people, so every applicant's resume must be filled with mountains of BS, even if it's totally IRRELEVANT to the position!"

Japan: "We need an engineer.  Oh, you have experience with this, you know about this type of machine?  Great, you're hired!"
Korea: "Yes, yes, I know you are a qualified engineer, but...are you also an Olympic level archery marksman, completed military service, have the ability to chug 3 bottles of soju, do a standing backflip,  while having a PhD in a major totally unrelated to our company? No..?  Okay..... sorry.... I don't think this job is for you...."

There is a kind of dark logic to it actually. The requirements keep jobs within the class so that they go to the sons and daughters of friends and relatives, rather than the common "riff raff".
I actually suspect that part of the reason that we are still here is mostly to maintain that illusion that the poor are still getting access to English education while the state and powers that be slowly rip chance after chance away from the lower and middle class.
Away an bile yer heid ya numpty,ye dinnae ken whit yer talkin aboot.


  • cee.bee
  • Explorer

    • 7

    • September 05, 2016, 02:22:48 pm
    • Busan
Re: Moon Jae-In to Shut Down English Teachers?
« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2017, 12:20:31 pm »

 Is it just me, or does Japan just have more logic than Korea?

Japan: "My company doesn't need English speaking workers, so I won't ask applicants for that."
Korea: "My company needs people, so every applicant's resume must be filled with mountains of BS, even if it's totally IRRELEVANT to the position!"

Japan: "We need an engineer.  Oh, you have experience with this, you know about this type of machine?  Great, you're hired!"
Korea: "Yes, yes, I know you are a qualified engineer, but...are you also an Olympic level archery marksman, completed military service, have the ability to chug 3 bottles of soju, do a standing backflip,  while having a PhD in a major totally unrelated to our company? No..?  Okay..... sorry.... I don't think this job is for you...."
This made me laugh  :laugh: and is so on point. My boyfriend (Korean) is currently job searching. I have never seen anything more ridiculous than the hoops he has to jump through.