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I'm referring to KJU playing with his big boy toys, the Park Geun-Hye situation and some recent international attention on the air pollution problem. Whatever the individual circumstances of these events and your opinions on them, it's hard to deny that Korea's had a pretty bad year publicity-wise.

Do you think this will lead to a dip in applications from foreign teachers? I know someone who's having unprecedented difficulty in filling a position for her hagwon, which led me to speculate about this. Seems plausible, though there are some mitigating factors:

1) The employment situation, at least in the US and the UK (I don't really know about anywhere else) is still pretty dire. Lots of low-paid, part-time jobs, coupled with high housing costs and (in the US) car dependency, expensive medical insurance, etc. A lot of young people still need an escape hatch.

2) Anxieties about the situation in Korea are counter-balanced by America's authoritarian lurch, Brexit, etc.

3) My impression is that many recent BA graduates who come to Korea aren't especially well-informed about the country, and are simply here because they were offered an easy setup. Once they're here, life is about collecting cute figurines from ArtBox and drinking with other foreigners for a year, periodically releasing some vlog diary in which they show you around their dumpy studio apartment for 25 minutes or eat a pancake from a street vendor. For this cohort, I just don't see external events having that much of an impact.


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1536

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
I was just contacted in the last week from a friend thinking of coming here. I sited the air pollution as the number one major issue, then KJU craziness as a distant second.

It is certainly possible people will not come here at all or not renew because of these problems.

The new presidential election is probably seen as a good thing by most people, IMHO.


I agree that the presidential election is a good thing, and many who understand it will agree. Given that coverage of countries like South Korea in the English-language media can be a bit simplistic and lacking in context, I'm guessing that the situation just signifies "unstable country" to your average viewer of the nightly news.


  • thunderlips
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1536

    • June 07, 2012, 10:01:55 am
    • South Korea
Let's not forget exploding cellphones and washing machines too!


A Minjoo victory will mean public school NET jobs being cut to the bone. We may see more racist anti-foreigner laws, but they'll be tempered by the fact that Korean factories and farms depend on a lot of Southeast Asian and Uzbek migrant labor. There will continue to be major Korean corruption scandals, and the Korean media will probably feel more emboldened to cover for Korean businesses and try to shift blame to foreigners.
Quote
Quote from: Mr.DeMartino on Yesterday at 01:40:32 PM
    Trump is a liar and a con man.
Quote
Quote from Mr.DeMartino on June 14, 2019 at 02:28:07 pm
Donald Trump is a lying sack of shit


A Minjoo victory will mean public school NET jobs being cut to the bone. We may see more racist anti-foreigner laws, but they'll be tempered by the fact that Korean factories and farms depend on a lot of Southeast Asian and Uzbek migrant labor. There will continue to be major Korean corruption scandals, and the Korean media will probably feel more emboldened to cover for Korean businesses and try to shift blame to foreigners.

Is there any chance of them not winning lol


  • gideonvasquez
  • Super Waygook

    • 461

    • August 27, 2015, 08:42:34 am
    • Uisung - Gyeongbuk-do
A Minjoo victory will mean public school NET jobs being cut to the bone. We may see more racist anti-foreigner laws, but they'll be tempered by the fact that Korean factories and farms depend on a lot of Southeast Asian and Uzbek migrant labor. There will continue to be major Korean corruption scandals, and the Korean media will probably feel more emboldened to cover for Korean businesses and try to shift blame to foreigners.

Is there any chance of them not winning lol
I think the only possible scenario that most commentators are putting up in the Korean news are centered on the other candidates uniting to select a single person among them. This is extremely unlikely. The other candidates are Hong Joon-pyo (Liberty Korea Party - Park's old crew), Yoo Seong-min (Bareun Party - LKP defectors), Sim Sang-jung (Justice Party - small fringe group), and Ahn Cheol-soo (People's Party).

From what I gather Ahn is the closest competitor but has about half the support that Moon does, 43% to 23%.

The problem with an alliance is that Ahn has a liberal base and Hong/Yoo are conservative (the last two also seem to hate each other).

So realistically unless something drastic happens to disqualify Moon in the eyes of the public, or the other four candidates combine into one ultron-esque super politician,  I don't see how he won't become president. The Trump-Clinton contest was a few percent gap between the main contenders going into the final week, this one is a 20% gap. And there isn't any mucking about with electoral colleges, you get the most votes and win.


  • Pecan
  • The Legend

    • 3769

    • December 27, 2010, 09:14:44 am
    • Seoul
Ahn will have a better chance of winning if he caters to the conservatives and promises to pardon PGH.


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1245

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
English teachers day here are numbered, expect new cuts with the new regime


Quote
The Trump-Clinton contest was a few percent gap between the main contenders going into the final week, this one is a 20% gap.

Uh, where did you see that number on Trump-Clinton? I thought everyone assumed it would be a slam dunk for Clinton. Even Nate Silver only gave Trump a 30% chance.


  • gideonvasquez
  • Super Waygook

    • 461

    • August 27, 2015, 08:42:34 am
    • Uisung - Gyeongbuk-do
Quote
The Trump-Clinton contest was a few percent gap between the main contenders going into the final week, this one is a 20% gap.

Uh, where did you see that number on Trump-Clinton? I thought everyone assumed it would be a slam dunk for Clinton. Even Nate Silver only gave Trump a 30% chance.
I was talking in raw support among the public since that's what matters in Korea. Clinton had I think 47% and Trump had 43% of the popular vote in the last poll before the vote occurred. The final tally was something like 48-46 in favor of Clinton (for the popular vote). The commentators predicting the likelihood of victory were deciding based on the U.S. electoral system.


  • poopfeast420
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • September 01, 2015, 02:25:40 pm
    • Ulsan
    more
I'm referring to KJU playing with his big boy toys, the Park Geun-Hye situation and some recent international attention on the air pollution problem. Whatever the individual circumstances of these events and your opinions on them, it's hard to deny that Korea's had a pretty bad year publicity-wise.

Do you think this will lead to a dip in applications from foreign teachers? I know someone who's having unprecedented difficulty in filling a position for her hagwon, which led me to speculate about this. Seems plausible, though there are some mitigating factors:

1) The employment situation, at least in the US and the UK (I don't really know about anywhere else) is still pretty dire. Lots of low-paid, part-time jobs, coupled with high housing costs and (in the US) car dependency, expensive medical insurance, etc. A lot of young people still need an escape hatch.

2) Anxieties about the situation in Korea are counter-balanced by America's authoritarian lurch, Brexit, etc.

3) My impression is that many recent BA graduates who come to Korea aren't especially well-informed about the country, and are simply here because they were offered an easy setup. Once they're here, life is about collecting cute figurines from ArtBox and drinking with other foreigners for a year, periodically releasing some vlog diary in which they show you around their dumpy studio apartment for 25 minutes or eat a pancake from a street vendor. For this cohort, I just don't see external events having that much of an impact.

lmao this is great. well said.


Quote
The Trump-Clinton contest was a few percent gap between the main contenders going into the final week, this one is a 20% gap.

Uh, where did you see that number on Trump-Clinton? I thought everyone assumed it would be a slam dunk for Clinton. Even Nate Silver only gave Trump a 30% chance.
I was talking in raw support among the public since that's what matters in Korea. Clinton had I think 47% and Trump had 43% of the popular vote in the last poll before the vote occurred. The final tally was something like 48-46 in favor of Clinton (for the popular vote). The commentators predicting the likelihood of victory were deciding based on the U.S. electoral system.

Ah. OK. Thanks for clarifying.


Expect many coming over to be largely ignorant about geopolitical events.  It won't deter too many wishing to come over.  There are less here due to other countries also hiring and an improving economy back home.  There are so many job offers both here and on Dave's.  Lots of ASAP offers for April and May.  Just take a look around.  If there aren't too many cuts, after the election, the teacher's market will do just fine, at least for awhile.