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  • mryogurt892
  • Veteran

    • 78

    • April 26, 2010, 09:25:20 am
    • Busan
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Making a boring lesson on purpose
« on: May 03, 2011, 09:09:09 am »
I have this one class that is just not cooperating with my English activities, thus I am going to make a special boring class just for them as a way of punishment.

Does anyone have a topic or particular lesson that would be useful?


Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2011, 09:13:22 am »
Different kings off grass and or rocks.
Freedom is like farts... You enjoy yours but usually can't stand other's...


Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2011, 09:16:54 am »
HAHA!  Different kinds of rocks! WIN. i'm deskwarming and stumbled across this thread.
But maybe throw in a sweet game at the end to show them the difference DURING the lesson time- and explain before starting the game...

[mod edit: profanity]
« Last Edit: May 03, 2011, 09:17:28 am by summerthyme »


  • Pin
  • Veteran

    • 108

    • March 30, 2011, 01:18:14 pm
    • Yongin, South Korea
Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2011, 09:33:23 am »
Teach them about the wonderful world of homophones and homonyms.  Make them repeat different words that sound exactly like one another for 40 straight minutes.
히라리 히라리


  • Jozigirl
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1045

    • May 03, 2011, 07:37:47 am
Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2011, 09:38:19 am »
By making a boring lesson on purpose, you're only going to further alienate them which will probably make things more frustrating and disappointing for you in the long run.  They're kids and this is their second languge - they're not always going to want to engage in activities.  Punishing them for not being as involved as you would like them to be is not going to do any good.


  • andyfoggy
  • Super Waygook

    • 357

    • December 07, 2010, 12:11:55 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2011, 09:45:43 am »
http://bogglesworldesl.com/irregular_verbs.htm

try these worksheets from bogggles world
don't use Powerpoint to enhance the lesson
make sure they do all the practice writing

I have done this to last years unruly second year middle school students and it looks like I will have to do it this year too

After 3 lessons they should have the message

Interesting classes will be much appreciated after this

and irregular past tense verbs are actually quite important and should be learned anyway ;)


Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2011, 10:00:22 am »
By making a boring lesson on purpose, you're only going to further alienate them which will probably make things more frustrating and disappointing for you in the long run.  They're kids and this is their second languge - they're not always going to want to engage in activities.  Punishing them for not being as involved as you would like them to be is not going to do any good.

I dunno, I had one class who were being pretty bad and not participating in games etc etc even though all the other classes who were being taught exactly the same lesson were doing so. So I got the school's copy of Cambridge Intermediate English Grammar workbook or something like that and made a sheet of repetitive exercises. I also picked random obscure words and if anyone talked during the class I gave them one of the sheets and they had to look up each word and write out the dictionary definition.

I made sure the class was silent the whole time and warned students that they'd have to finish the sheets for homework (which I didn't follow up on). I gave them a little speech at the start about what I expected from them, and how the other classes had no problem etc etc. And I also stressed how little I enjoyed doing classes like this (it dragged out so much). But I basically told them it was my job to teach them and if we couldn't do it the way I wanted to do it we would have to do it through grammar drills. It doesn't have to alienate them if you make it clear that it's not a punishment, but a last resort, and show them that you don't want to do this any more than they do.

I think I did it twice (it was quite a while ago) and both times they responded pretty well so I finished it up early and moved on to a more fun lesson. I've not had problems since so I think it's a really good idea to do it if all else has failed. Good luck!


  • elzoog
  • Expert Waygook

    • 594

    • July 15, 2009, 08:22:23 am
    • South Korea
Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2011, 10:02:37 am »
I have this one class that is just not cooperating with my English activities, thus I am going to make a special boring class just for them as a way of punishment.

Does anyone have a topic or particular lesson that would be useful?

With my class that is like that, I did Easy True Stories.   Did it because it requires very little prep.   Figure if they don't go out of their way for me, why should I go out of my way for them?



  • Sara
  • Featured Contributor

    • 702

    • September 01, 2010, 08:58:35 am
    • Chungcheongbukdo
Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2011, 10:06:56 am »
How about starting with your normal, fun lesson and then punishing them if they don't participate. Hopefully if they see the cause and effect, they'll shape up. If they're not participating then just have them do lots of worksheets or write lines.


  • colmmccann
  • Veteran

    • 80

    • February 09, 2011, 03:24:18 am
    • Chungju, Chungbuk Provience, SK
Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2011, 10:07:39 am »
Life of/inside a ping-pong ball...


  • DevilMogun
  • Super Waygook

    • 255

    • October 17, 2010, 08:11:46 pm
    • Namhae, South Korea
Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2011, 10:12:59 am »
By making a boring lesson on purpose, you're only going to further alienate them which will probably make things more frustrating and disappointing for you in the long run.  They're kids and this is their second languge - they're not always going to want to engage in activities.  Punishing them for not being as involved as you would like them to be is not going to do any good.

I don't think giving a boring lesson alienates them.  I too have had lessons with totally disruptive, rude classes when their 3 or 4 peer groups have had great fun and learnt something too.  I put a lot of effort into my lessons to make them fun, interesting, eductional, relevant and appropriate to ability - if the class isn't going to make the effort then I need to show them what it feels like when I don't make the effort either.  It's a better message than some random punisment or ignoring the problem and pressing on, smiling and unperturbed.

My personal favourite - as I can switch to it mid lesson if it looks like it's going wrong - is just to use the class audio files - the stuff they are learning with their Korean teacher - and just repeat and repeat and repeat. Have them repeat it, or write it down, or just listen.   I have literally sat on a chair pressing 'play' over and over for the same inane conversation.  They crack before I do and then we can get on with a fun lesson, appreciated as it should be.
"She lacks the indefinable charm of weakness" Oscar Wilde


Re: Making a boring lesson on purpose
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2011, 10:25:56 am »
Doing a boring class is an excellent way to reel in an out of control class. I've had to do it for 2 of my classes so far this year.

Sometimes, if kids are so far below the curriculum AND they don't care about English AND they have friends in class, it's simply impossible to follow the normal, "fun-incorporated" English classes that we teach as NETs. In fact, kids like this are so much unable to appreciate the fun that would be in your lesson, that they appreciate a boring lesson more, thus behaving better. I think this is partly due to the fact that these students can mildly grasp the book, and don't feel as bad about themselves or as out of their depth with just repetition. Usually game require a more in-depth understanding of the material, that these students just don't have.

So actually, a boring class can help build your students confidence and interest in English. Shocking, I know.

When I do a boring class, I don't go outside of the curriculum, I just stick solely to book exercises and repetition. I want to show them that there's more than one way I can teach them the material, but come hell or high water,  I will get them to look at it and attempt to make them learn it. It's their choice: my way or the book way.

Another method I've found effective for these classes: Make everyone in the class stand. Students must produce a sentence or repeat a short dialogue of target language chosen if they want to sit down. After they've said their bit of English they may sit quietly until the whole class is back in their seats. It forces them all to participate and it grabs their attention. I do this at the end of class and then sometimes finish it off by making the class repeat the language again all together.

Ex: I write a variety of problems on the board. Each student must provided a different answer to the problem with "I think you should" etc