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Re: Epik application review
« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2017, 05:50:39 am »

I wouldn't worry too much about the essay or lesson plan. You can pretty much guarantee no one's going to read them. They'll check you've done them sure, but they'll have a much quicker way of reducing the application pile. Like having a quick look at qualifications, weeding out those with none, then just going by the photo or something.

The part in bold is the only part I agree with here. You shouldn't worry too much at the initial stage, just that you follow the requirements outlined (word count, length, completeness). However, they absolutely are read. EPIK coordinators often tell applicants during the interview stage to revise/edit certain things about their essays and lesson plan. This is extremely common. So you will be given a chance to fix something that EPIK deems too cheesy, too difficult, etc, in those sections, but hopefully you want as little of that as possible.

I admit I don't know anything about applying for EPIK but why would they tell people to revise/edit interview essays/plans in a job interview? That's bizarre. It sounds like something people doing a course would be asked to do. Are they going to print them in a book or stick them on a website later or something?
« Last Edit: February 07, 2017, 05:56:12 am by eggieguffer »


  • 02sanupp
  • Veteran

    • 163

    • April 28, 2016, 09:52:05 am
    • Korea
Re: Epik application review
« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2017, 08:22:23 am »
Are you applying directly through EPIK or through a recruiter? I came through Korean Horizons but the way they carried themselves and came across was that they were part of the EPIK company rather than working on behalf of them....

Just a thought as to why they are asking you to edit your essay/lesson plan  :smiley:


  • Mezoti97
  • The Legend

    • 2684

    • April 14, 2011, 03:02:50 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Epik application review
« Reply #22 on: February 07, 2017, 11:09:04 am »
I noticed there are some typos in your lesson plan, so you might want to proofread your lesson plan over again to fix any small mistakes like that.


  • kriztee
  • Expert Waygook

    • 764

    • December 18, 2015, 01:33:06 am
Re: Epik application review
« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2017, 12:04:45 pm »
For the essay parts I had a recruitar tell me to edit some of it, not EPIK, but they do read those parts because in my interview they asked about my essay and lesson plan. Not wanting me to change it but just asked questions based on what I had written, something to the effect of how my teaching philosophy affected how I developed my lesson plan. So they will have those parts in front of them while interviewing you and if you have spelling mistakes or massive grammer errors someone will probably see it at some point.


  • elsbethm
  • Veteran

    • 134

    • September 29, 2016, 09:26:54 pm
    • gangwondo
Re: Epik application review
« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2017, 12:28:06 pm »

I admit I don't know anything about applying for EPIK but why would they tell people to revise/edit interview essays/plans in a job interview? That's bizarre. It sounds like something people doing a course would be asked to do. Are they going to print them in a book or stick them on a website later or something?
[/quote]

It's ultimately up to the MOE/POE to accept and hire the applicant。EPIK is more of a centralized recruiting agency to streamline the process。So, the EPIK interviewer may tell someone to change things if they think it will help the MOE/POE to accept them.


Re: Epik application review
« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2017, 12:37:15 pm »
Hmm the first thing I noticed was that your gpa is pretty average.  You couldn't even get into most grad schools with less than a 3.0.  Your degree is not related to English or education, you don't have much teaching experience and your TEFL doesn't have any in class hours. Not saying that is exactly what's holding you back, we don't know what it is for sure. 

Perhaps in your essay and teaching philosophy you could mention more about what you have learned from your substitute teaching experience and TEFL course experience.  Try and show your strengths in these spaces.  Do you have any volunteer experience working with children you could add to your "non-teaching' work experience?  Any tutoring or babysitting experience? 


Re: Epik application review
« Reply #26 on: February 07, 2017, 12:51:38 pm »
One of the reasons they are declining your application is  because you have no inclass hours on your TEFL.

In-class hour are not a requirement for the EPIK program and so they won't fail someone just for having no in-class hours.


I wouldn't worry too much about the essay or lesson plan. You can pretty much guarantee no one's going to read them. They'll check you've done them sure, but they'll have a much quicker way of reducing the application pile. Like having a quick look at qualifications, weeding out those with none, then just going by the photo or something.

The part in bold is the only part I agree with here. You shouldn't worry too much at the initial stage, just that you follow the requirements outlined (word count, length, completeness). However, they absolutely are read. EPIK coordinators often tell applicants during the interview stage to revise/edit certain things about their essays and lesson plan. This is extremely common. So you will be given a chance to fix something that EPIK deems too cheesy, too difficult, etc, in those sections, but hopefully you want as little of that as possible.

I admit I don't know anything about applying for EPIK but why would they tell people to revise/edit interview essays/plans in a job interview? That's bizarre. It sounds like something people doing a course would be asked to do. Are they going to print them in a book or stick them on a website later or something?


They do read through the essays and lesson plan.  They also ask you do review/edit the essays and lesson plan (if you apply directly, not via a recruiter) because if you pass the interview, they then have to recommend you to an office of education.  If either of those two things aren't good, then they can't place you.

Process looks like this for direct to EPIK:
Apply-> EPIK Interview -> Results-> EPIK Coord recommends to MOE/POE -> Results-> Placement

Going through agency:
Apply agency-> Agency Interview-> Results-> Agency recommends to EPIK-> EPIK Interview-> Results -> EPIK recommends to MOE/POE -> Results-> EPIK tells Agency -> Placement

Check the site if you want the long form: http://bit.ly/1Wby1fP


  • What?What?
  • Expert Waygook

    • 602

    • October 14, 2016, 10:29:17 am
    • Korea
Re: Epik application review
« Reply #27 on: February 07, 2017, 01:05:46 pm »
In-class hours with your TEFL/TESOL is a requirement, 20 hrs is the min and I think some areas ask for more. I may be a bit off on the date, but I think the requirement changed in 2015 for the Spring 2016 intake, before that it was just a preference.

*EDIT. I applied for the Spring intake 2017 (now, just double checked and yeah, they asked for my in class TEFL certificate as well as my online). I only used my online when I applied three yeas ago...
« Last Edit: February 07, 2017, 01:16:21 pm by What?What? »
People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
-A.A. Milne


Re: Epik application review
« Reply #28 on: February 07, 2017, 01:23:18 pm »
Quote
They do read through the essays and lesson plan.

I'll take your word for it, though I'm very surprised it's true. I reckon they probably just skim through the ones of the people they've already decided to interview. Who's got time to read hundreds of very similar lesson plans and essays all in a foreign language? I know I wouldn't in their position.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2017, 01:26:00 pm by eggieguffer »


  • kriztee
  • Expert Waygook

    • 764

    • December 18, 2015, 01:33:06 am
Re: Epik application review
« Reply #29 on: February 07, 2017, 02:29:54 pm »
Quote
They do read through the essays and lesson plan.

I'll take your word for it, though I'm very surprised it's true. I reckon they probably just skim through the ones of the people they've already decided to interview. Who's got time to read hundreds of very similar lesson plans and essays all in a foreign language? I know I wouldn't in their position.

Not everyone reviewing applications is Korean. And not everyone interviewing is Korean. I had an American guy interview me for the actual EPIK interview. My recruiter told me at the time that they have about 2-3 Native English speakers and 6-7 Koreans who do hiring. So you're more likely to be skimmed but I'm fairly sure the OP didn't get in because of accidentally checking that they didn't attend an English school from grades 7-university. That and the accidental same answer for both essays.


Re: Epik application review
« Reply #30 on: February 07, 2017, 03:09:09 pm »
In-class hours with your TEFL/TESOL is a requirement, 20 hrs is the min and I think some areas ask for more. I may be a bit off on the date, but I think the requirement changed in 2015 for the Spring 2016 intake, before that it was just a preference.

*EDIT. I applied for the Spring intake 2017 (now, just double checked and yeah, they asked for my in class TEFL certificate as well as my online). I only used my online when I applied three yeas ago...

I'm sorry but this is not correct.  This is quoted from their website in the Required Documents section (http://bit.ly/2kBZFTZ):

"All TEFL/TESOL certificates must be at least 100 hours (online). In the future, we may require that the TEFL course have an in-class component of 20 hours. This is currently not required. However, many offices of education look favorably on those who have completed a TEFL certificate with an in-class component."

Now, you are correct that an office of education through EPIK does require in-class hours and that would only be Busan (with 50 hours in-class required).

T
Quote
They do read through the essays and lesson plan.

I'll take your word for it, though I'm very surprised it's true. I reckon they probably just skim through the ones of the people they've already decided to interview. Who's got time to read hundreds of very similar lesson plans and essays all in a foreign language? I know I wouldn't in their position.

Not everyone reviewing applications is Korean. And not everyone interviewing is Korean. I had an American guy interview me for the actual EPIK interview. My recruiter told me at the time that they have about 2-3 Native English speakers and 6-7 Koreans who do hiring. So you're more likely to be skimmed but I'm fairly sure the OP didn't get in because of accidentally checking that they didn't attend an English school from grades 7-university. That and the accidental same answer for both essays.

I don't believe the OP has been denied.  I could be wrong, OP?