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There is an exceedingly small chance that I will need to resign from the EPIK program during my second contract. I applied for a graduate program that I have about a 1% chance of actually getting accepted into with the financial aid package I would need.

Will I still be eligible for pension and/or severance if I need to leave? Will I have to pay anything back?

The contract is ambiguous.

Thanks for any help.

Edit: The title of this question is also ambiguous; I am sorry. I would be resigning from my renewed contract, so during my second year as an EPIK teacher.


Re: What happens if you resign a few months into a new EPIK contract?
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2016, 09:58:21 am »
You'll get severance and pension if you complete anything over 1 year.


Re: What happens if you resign a few months into a new EPIK contract?
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2016, 12:11:34 pm »
There is an exceedingly small chance that I will need to resign from the EPIK program during my second contract. I applied for a graduate program that I have about a 1% chance of actually getting accepted into with the financial aid package I would need.

Will I still be eligible for pension and/or severance if I need to leave? Will I have to pay anything back?

The contract is ambiguous.

Thanks for any help.

Edit: The title of this question is also ambiguous; I am sorry. I would be resigning from my renewed contract, so during my second year as an EPIK teacher.

I would assume you would get all the pension you have contributed since it accumulates on a monthly basis, and only 1 year worth of severance since it requires a full year's worth of work to be entitled to.


Re: What happens if you resign a few months into a new EPIK contract?
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2016, 12:25:15 pm »
This subject has been discussed so many times, and yet, people still manage to give wrong information.

Firstly, let's be clear, pension and severance are not connected.

You will get severance for any number of months worked provided it is at least 12 months.  The problem is that some places give severance after every 12 months (they shouldn't- only when you leave your last contract).  So, let's say you worked 3 months into your second contract.  If you received severance at the end of your first contract you will get nothing for the 3 additional months worked.  If you did not receive severance at the end of your first contract (which should be the case) you will get 3/12ths more.

Severance is calculated as n/12 x (average salary for the  last three months), where n is the total number of months worked.  So, 1 year = 12 months = 12/12ths = 1x monthly salary.  1 year 3 months = 15 months = 15/12ths = 1.25x monthly salary.

Pension is dealt with by the pension office.  You will get a refund of monies paid if you qualify, regardless of length of service.

Paying back stuff- this is detailed in your contract.  It might say you have to pay back airfare if you quit within the first 6 months.  Since you are renewing it might say you have to pay back all or part of your renewal bonus.


Re: What happens if you resign a few months into a new EPIK contract?
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2016, 12:45:14 pm »
You will get severance for any number of months worked provided it is at least 12 months.  The problem is that some places give severance after every 12 months (they shouldn't- only when you leave your last contract).  So, let's say you worked 3 months into your second contract.  If you received severance at the end of your first contract you will get nothing for the 3 additional months worked.  If you did not receive severance at the end of your first contract (which should be the case) you will get 3/12ths more.

That would be the sensible thing but from experience, this has never happened.  My EPIK contract has always been paid to me each year, even though I have transferred in the same city for nine years.  Last year, I quit my middle school after 8 months and was given 8 months of severance.  There was no discussion about whether I should get it or not, they just gave it to me.

Ah, you were lucky then.  There was a law change a few years back which was supposed to enforce withholding of severance until a person finally leaves their employer.  It's also better that way as you get paid out based on your final salary, which is generally higher than your starting salary.