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  • jimwall5
  • Veteran

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    • March 03, 2014, 07:49:56 pm
    • Korea
American Vs UK English
« on: August 25, 2016, 10:52:38 am »
Hi,
Here is my lesson plan for American vs UK English. I borrowed a little from other users, but mostly it's my own work.
The lesson plan should explain what to do, but if you need any clarification let me know :).
Also, I originally embedded a video of the Youtube "star" Dave talking to a British friend of his, but the file was too large so I've just included the link.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2016, 10:57:44 am by jimwall5 »


  • ms_mandy
  • Waygookin

    • 21

    • September 18, 2014, 02:27:44 pm
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2016, 03:41:37 pm »
Good job on this PPT. I will use this for my after school class. Thanks for sharing  ;D


  • jimwall5
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    • March 03, 2014, 07:49:56 pm
    • Korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2016, 07:48:29 am »
Good job on this PPT. I will use this for my after school class. Thanks for sharing  ;D

No problem. Let me know how it goes.


  • nait
  • Newgookin

    • 3

    • September 18, 2015, 02:04:40 pm
    • south korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2016, 12:38:02 pm »
Thank you! Everything looks great.


  • jimwall5
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    • March 03, 2014, 07:49:56 pm
    • Korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2016, 10:37:35 am »
I forgot to include all the cards for the final game. I've edited it so there are cards for question 1.


Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2016, 12:06:42 pm »
This is absolutely cracking - can't wait to use this for my English club later.

I've also included two youtube clips to introduce / round the class up..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1S2i7A35e9Y

&

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye4fFpEZdI0
 
Thank you for posting this!!! I'm a Brit and find students get confused when I pronounce words so differently :)


  • jimwall5
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    • March 03, 2014, 07:49:56 pm
    • Korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2016, 04:01:36 pm »
I'm glad you found it useful. I'm not a huge fan of Dave, but I also used one of his videos in the class. The kids seemed to enjoy his video though.


Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2016, 10:59:39 pm »
No way are chips (BrE) the same as French fries http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/06/08/chips_acrylamide_warning/
I did my own BrE v ame lesson for my adult students but I did Taboo at the end instead of a role play.


  • jimwall5
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    • March 03, 2014, 07:49:56 pm
    • Korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2016, 07:46:44 am »
No way are chips (BrE) the same as French fries http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/06/08/chips_acrylamide_warning/
I did my own BrE v ame lesson for my adult students but I did Taboo at the end instead of a role play.

Are you just being pedantic? If you served a plate of British chips to Americans and asked them what they were, they'd say they were french fries. Admittedly, I sometimes refer to Mcdonald's chips as french fries because they aren't as good as regular chips, but I think most people would agree that french fries and chips are synonymous.
The roleplay was the second to last activity. At the end I did a speed quiz where they have to run and find the answer on a card stuck to the back wall. Taboo is always a good game to play, but I think I've overused it in previous classes this semester.


Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2016, 08:10:56 am »
No way are chips (BrE) the same as French fries http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/06/08/chips_acrylamide_warning/
I did my own BrE v ame lesson for my adult students but I did Taboo at the end instead of a role play.

Are you just being pedantic? If you served a plate of British chips to Americans and asked them what they were, they'd say they were french fries. Admittedly, I sometimes refer to Mcdonald's chips as french fries because they aren't as good as regular chips, but I think most people would agree that french fries and chips are synonymous.
The roleplay was the second to last activity. At the end I did a speed quiz where they have to run and find the answer on a card stuck to the back wall. Taboo is always a good game to play, but I think I've overused it in previous classes this semester.

I agree.  Chips (hot) and french fries are synonymous.  One could try to argue that french fries are thinly cut chips and therefore are different, but that's really splitting hairs/potatoes. They are both slices of potato fried and served hot (preferably with gravy and not tomato sauce/ketchup).  For all intents and purposes, to a second language learner, they are the same.  When that learner is of a high enough level then you could explain the subtle differences.  There are enough interesting differences between British and American English to not be so pedantic.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2016, 08:59:56 am by welcomebackkotter »


  • chuckd
  • Veteran

    • 92

    • June 08, 2010, 03:12:06 pm
    • Busan South Korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2016, 10:26:47 am »
Here's another video on the main differences between British English and American English pronunciation.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AGFmgmcmj4&index=16&list=PLl4RI1pH-8dHcFmJQd4M9bp4rtsHINzWg



Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2016, 11:30:16 am »
sorry once again but chips (BrE) are chips and French fries are French fries (Yeh the McDonald's stuff). It may well be an American calls chips French fries but a brit like myself doesn't and wouldn't innit. They're a totally different look and taste. It might be ok to use them "synonomously" as you put it but students need to be told what a real chip is IMO. It's more fun that way. For young kids though, just say theyre the same innit.


  • jimwall5
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    • March 03, 2014, 07:49:56 pm
    • Korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2016, 11:43:36 am »
sorry once again but chips (BrE) are chips and French fries are French fries (Yeh the McDonald's stuff). It may well be an American calls chips French fries but a brit like myself doesn't and wouldn't innit. They're a totally different look and taste. It might be ok to use them "synonomously" as you put it but students need to be told what a real chip is IMO. It's more fun that way. For young kids though, just say theyre the same innit.
I mean that's a personal view, but I'm teaching what Americans would say vs what British people would say, so Americans would call chips french fries. I have to generalise a little. It's always up to you if you want to give across your personal opinion about what exactly these words mean to you, but by definition these are the same thing. Personally I wouldn't want to waste too much time going into the intricacies of the exact differences between French fries and chips according to everyone in the UK, particularly as I think it would just end up the confusing the students more.


Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2016, 01:07:10 pm »
Don't forget U and non-U English.

https://pocketbookuk.com/2015/07/28/u-or-non-u/


Also, gravy on fries/chips is good once a year, any more than that it is utterly disgusting. Good chips/fries need no sauces, save for perhaps a little vinegar.


Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2016, 01:18:02 pm »

Also, gravy on fries/chips is good once a year, any more than that it is utterly disgusting. Good chips/fries need no sauces, save for perhaps a little vinegar.

I actually agree.  Once (maybe twice if spread out) a year for chips and gravy is enough.  Get a good chip, like those back home, some salt (or maybe even chicken salt if you're feeling ambitious), vinegar or a squeeze of lemon is all you need.  Sauce is not needed.

And I wouldn't waste time telling students the difference between chips and french fries in the course of a general lesson, unless the title was 'The Pedantic and Mundane Differences between two forms of English'.


  • jimwall5
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    • 156

    • March 03, 2014, 07:49:56 pm
    • Korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #15 on: August 21, 2017, 10:36:54 am »
I've made another similar lesson to teach some more British vs American language differences. Feel free to use and/or discuss if you disagree with my word choices.
Enjoy.


  • yirj17
  • The Legend

    • 2782

    • September 16, 2015, 02:23:16 am
    • Korealand
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2017, 10:51:47 am »
And I wouldn't waste time telling students the difference between chips and french fries in the course of a general lesson, unless the title was 'The Pedantic and Mundane Differences between two forms of English'.


One lesson happened to be an opportune time to show the kids videos of foods, so one of the videos I chose was about how different countries served fries.  I told them about chips and french fries for fun, not that I expected any of them to remember that tidbit, of course.  Ah, any chance to show a food video gets us all drooling!


  • heyujiwon
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    • September 05, 2017, 08:58:27 am
    • UlSan
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #17 on: September 05, 2017, 09:20:28 am »
Gooooood! Thank you


  • richblue
  • Newgookin

    • 3

    • September 19, 2017, 02:52:28 pm
    • Ulsan, Korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #18 on: September 19, 2017, 03:03:14 pm »
This is great materials to teach the difference between two countries. Thank you ;D


  • kmg1006
  • Newgookin

    • 4

    • November 05, 2017, 08:34:39 pm
    • korea
Re: American Vs UK English
« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2017, 06:59:18 pm »
This is useful!