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International => North America => USA => Topic started by: Rumbledy Hump on July 10, 2014, 01:16:39 pm

Title: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: Rumbledy Hump on July 10, 2014, 01:16:39 pm
What do folks from the southeastern US think of the Korean heat? Ignoring the fact that schools are stingy on AC, how do you handle it?

Richmond, VA is about the same in terms of temperature with slightly less humidity. Looking at Atlanta, the humidity and temperature are both slightly higher. I'm also comparing this to my city Daegu, which everyone tells me is the hottest place in Korea.

This may be the only time I've felt advantaged to be from a southern state.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: bbNiks on July 10, 2014, 01:34:57 pm
Georgia here. I've thought the exact same thing! All through May and June I kept thinking, "When is it going to get hot?" Sure, it sucks to not have the AC on, but in my opinion, both the actual temperature and humidity are WAY less offensive than a typical Georgia summer. Especially when you consider that summer is basically from late April to early October. Koreans and their heat.  :undecided:
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: stickfigure on July 10, 2014, 01:38:52 pm
New Orleans here. 

Very few places on earth get humid like the NO.  I mean, you walk at a slow pace for one block and you are drenched in sweat.  That being said, everyone there is aware of the heat index and recognizes that we humans will be quite sluggish in that heat without AC.  I can't think of anywhere in the city or its surrounding area that even thinks of cutting back on AC.  Also the standards of dress are different.  It's acceptable and encouraged to wear sandals, dresses, skirts (of a longer length than here), and sleeveless tops. 

So yes, it's much hotter there, but the way they handle it is just more comfortable.

Oh, and everybody there sweats as much as me.  There's a sense of camaraderie that comes with sweating your ass off for three months straight.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: gtrain83 on July 10, 2014, 01:42:24 pm
As a native Floridian the heat/humidity is normal to me. It is the lack of A/C that is the problem.

Back home I go from AC cooled house, to AC cooled car, to AC cooled building (real ac not set at 28) with minimal time in the heat. Not so much here.

I hate going into a restaurant that has a fan on and nothing else and sweating while I eat. ( i usually will just leave and go elsewhere now) I liken being here with no air to the summer I laid sod to save money between college semesters.

Also, the winters back home are 100x better.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: nschenk512 on July 10, 2014, 01:53:35 pm
Texan. The heat here is mild, temperature wise, but the humidity is a bitch and a half. At least if you go into the shade in Texas you get a break. It was full dark out two nights ago and I started sweating just walking down the street.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: iamrhart on July 10, 2014, 02:01:15 pm
I am from the North East.
HOWEVER, i consider myself quite adaptable.
I have spent time with my Floridian family, as well as staying in Korea and the Philippines.
Out of all (Southeast USA, Philippines, and South Korea), i feel South Korea is the worst.

For example, here, it is about 94* and 61% humid (SK).
Philippines, it is 103* and 74% humid.

Difference? temperature and humidity, Philippines is worse, but there is something about having WIND that cools someone off. Also, the Philippines is not *entirely* covered with Pavement and reflecting windows. 

South Korea feels like everywhere the heat will get you.  No wind to cool you. Pavement and asphalt everywhere, windows that reflect the sun directly at you. etc.

Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: jesAaKa1023 on July 10, 2014, 02:21:13 pm
Georgia, here. I grew up in a house without air conditioning, so the lack doesn't bother me as long as I can turn on the fans, or open the windows.  On a normal day, I open the windows as soon as I get to school so that I can feel the breeze, I also keep the lights off for as long possible.  I also turn on the fans sometimes (none of my co-teachers care because they are hot too). I have also started wearing tank tops to school. Once again, no one really cares what I wear. Overall I would agree that Georgia summers are hotter and more oppressive. 
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: lifeisgood6447 on July 10, 2014, 02:23:36 pm
North Carolina here, too. Right smack dab in the middle, and it is usually hot and humid with next to no wind. I still sweat and think it is hot here, but, then again everywhere you there is no a/c on. If it is on here, the temperature isn't all that cold. At least in NC everywhere you go in the summer has the air blowing cold as ice.  :shocked:
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: Rumbledy Hump on July 10, 2014, 02:46:40 pm
Wow, ladies, I never thought about how standards of dress affect you in the summer.  :shocked: Very sad, indeed.

I actually do hate the heat and humidity back home, so I like to think I'm just used to being miserable. I feel for all of you who are new to the humidity. I took a trip to Seattle last summer (when the weather was beautiful). Exiting the airport in Richmond was like walking into a brick wall of swamp ass.

Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: BearNana on July 10, 2014, 02:51:19 pm
I hope the people posting about how it's not too bad realise that this isn't as hot as it gets here...
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: Rumbledy Hump on July 10, 2014, 03:06:49 pm
I hope the people posting about how it's not too bad realise that this isn't as hot as it gets here...

It's pretty close. July is the second hottest month (on average one Fahrenheit degree less than August for Daegu) and the temperatures for the past two weeks are around (often above) the average highs in the climate data.

Besides, after hearing about how miserably hot it is here, I check the weather back home everyday. It's about the same. The hottest day (so far) was back home (at 99, I think Daegu's hottest was 91 or 92). It makes sense as both Korea and the South are subtropical regions.

Don't underestimate Southern heat...
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: iamrhart on July 10, 2014, 03:10:01 pm
That would be July 18.
Traditionally the "hottest day" of the year. The 'traditional dish' for this day is a chicken-ginseng soup.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: Cask85 on July 10, 2014, 03:13:47 pm
I hope the people posting about how it's not too bad realise that this isn't as hot as it gets here...

Precisely. Wait till much later when it gets so hot that you sweat even as you shower. . .
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: Mezoti97 on July 10, 2014, 03:32:57 pm
I'm not from the south, but a friend of mine is, and he tolerates the summers in Korea much, much better than I do.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: MayorHaggar on July 10, 2014, 06:29:51 pm
I'm from Florida. We have air conditioning there, and it's on from March to November. Makes a big difference.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: ghawk on July 10, 2014, 09:32:12 pm
Also a native Floridian. Air conditioning is a MUST and is in every house and store and restaurant. I remember in class I would actually get so cold that it would feel nice to walk outside (but for only a few minutes).
I think I turned my AC on in April, and yeah, it can stay on through November, though I remember many a Christmas being 80F and going to the beach.
All in all, heat and humidity is bearable with AC, and Korea should comply...
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: johnny russian on July 10, 2014, 10:29:00 pm
I hope the people posting about how it's not too bad realise that this isn't as hot as it gets here...

and this summer has actually been pretty mild so far, at least where i am, and at least compared to last year. last year i would be drenched in sweat at 7:30am standing at the bus stop, in the shade. and this was a mere 5 minutes after going outside. i'm not even a big guy and i don't even usually sweat that much.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: VanIslander on July 10, 2014, 10:30:15 pm
A fellow teacher is from Arizona and he has complained about the heat already this summer.  :shocked: I know this is Jeju Island, but really!
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: mmerza on July 11, 2014, 02:31:04 am
Alright, I'm not from the southern US, ( New Yorker ).   However can generally deal with hot weather much better than cold.   I mean yeah Korea is humid in the summer, but I look around and I'm not the only one sweating.   Although some Koreans seem to be wearing long sleeves, particularly women that are avoiding the suns' rays and not breaking a sweat.  That is weird. 

What I find a serious nuisance are all the flies though.  I hate eating or drinking and having to worry about them landing on me or my food or beverage, gross !
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: MayorHaggar on July 11, 2014, 08:07:30 am
What makes the heat (and the cold) worse is how poorly insulated everything is here. Buildings, especially public buildings like schools and bus stations, are basically giant glass boxes full of aluminum poles. All the heat escapes in winter and it turns into a glasshouse in summer.


I hope the people posting about how it's not too bad realise that this isn't as hot as it gets here...

and this summer has actually been pretty mild so far, at least where i am, and at least compared to last year. last year i would be drenched in sweat at 7:30am standing at the bus stop, in the shade. and this was a mere 5 minutes after going outside. i'm not even a big guy and i don't even usually sweat that much.

Yeah this year has been really mild all year long. Winter basically ended in mid-February, by late March it was warm enough for the cherry blossoms to show up early, and it didn't really get warm until late June. Last year was a joke, it was still snowing in early April, and there was about one week of nice springlike weather in May before it got hot and nasty.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: nschenk512 on July 11, 2014, 08:23:43 am
Neoguri just passed us in Busan, and today is the first day that actually looks and kind of feels like summer. It's been muggy and blech all of June, and maybe now it'll start to actually get hot instead of staying cloudy and humid. Give me that sunshine!
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: William George on July 11, 2014, 09:18:01 am
I made the mistake of spending last summer in Canada and lost all of the heat and humidity resistance I gained in Japan.

Maybe it's just this year, though... It doesn't seem as hot and sticky as I remember it being the last time I was here.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: Space on July 11, 2014, 09:47:42 am
I hope the people posting about how it's not too bad realise that this isn't as hot as it gets here...

Precisely. Wait till much later when it gets so hot that you sweat even as you shower. . .

Or how it's so hot you have to get naked to poop.


Someone told me they're expecting it to not get as warm this year. I don't know where they got that climate data from so can't confirm. Last year, I left the country for 4 weeks in August. I heard it was touching 40 for a few weeks in my hood. Sounds grim. My friends camped out in my apt for the AC.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: Avande1882 on July 11, 2014, 09:56:19 am
South Carolina here. Im used to intense heat and 100% humidity in the summer with temps above 100.  And I sweat like madddd. After walking around for 5 minutes, Im already sweating and my clothes are sticking to me, but its the same for everyone else, so its not a big deal. I also grew up in a house with no AC, but we kept windows and doors open. I actually dont  like AC. The mold, dirt and such in AC's get to me something fierce so I much prefer open doors and windows over AC. But I also grew up in a beach town where the air is fresh and light--so although the heat was staggering, it was alright because the air and breeze (when there was some), made it endurable. Where I am in Korea, the air is pretty rancid. When I open my windows I get flooded with the stench of sewage, fish, cigs, etc... That coupled with the humidity makes opening the windows not an option. Turning on the AC for me, is just as crummy an option because AC's always set my allergies ablaze. If the air wasnt so thick and heavy, I wouldnt mind the heat so much, but those things make it pretty unbearable.

The fact that I have a 45 minute commute to school doesnt help either. When Im on the bus, sometimes I just have to get off 5-7 minutes into my commute, stand outside for a bit to cool off, and wait for another bus to come because no one opens the windows on the bus, the bus is packed and I am literally drenched and dripping in sweat. ugh.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: keakdasneak on July 11, 2014, 10:02:53 am
New Orleans here. 

Very few places on earth get humid like the NO.  I mean, you walk at a slow pace for one block and you are drenched in sweat.  That being said, everyone there is aware of the heat index and recognizes that we humans will be quite sluggish in that heat without AC.  I can't think of anywhere in the city or its surrounding area that even thinks of cutting back on AC.  Also the standards of dress are different.  It's acceptable and encouraged to wear sandals, dresses, skirts (of a longer length than here), and sleeveless tops. 

So yes, it's much hotter there, but the way they handle it is just more comfortable.

Oh, and everybody there sweats as much as me.  There's a sense of camaraderie that comes with sweating your ass off for three months straight.

Another Louisianian checking in. This summer has been pretty mild so far. There is no such thing in Louisiana. I ran my air for the first time on Wednesday. Last night I slept with the windows open again. I actually got a little chilly. There at no breaks from the heat and humidity in Louisiana. It sets in around May and doesn't break till end of September. The heat here will break around late August. Having said that I don't handle the hot classrooms any better because I'm from Louisiana.
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: nermal on July 11, 2014, 12:04:13 pm
Hot Schmot. Take a trip to Tunisia.
We get it. People from the South can tolerate the heat more, just like the Canadians can tolerate the cold more. Is this surprising to anyone?
Title: Re: Hot, Schmot. Take a trip to the South.
Post by: orangeman on July 12, 2014, 07:41:33 pm
I have never visited the American South, so I have no idea what it's like.  However, I wonder how long many of you guys have been in Korea only because this summer is by far the fairest and nicest summer I've had here in a decade.  I wouldn't take this as normal by any means. 

Usually by this time it's grey skies, heavy rain, 35c+, intense humidity and general terribleness.  Last year at this time I was at a baseball game where the temperature was 36c with late 80s humidity, at 9pm.  By contrast, this summer has been delightful.  Sunny, with only occasional rain, and minimum humidity.  Someone above said at the height of a Korean summer you end up sweating even during a shower.  That is very true.  As a card carrying member of "Screw Korean Summers" I usually blast my AC non-stop in my place for every waking moment.  Right now I have a fan on minimum and I'm fine.  In mid-July!  Let the angels rejoice! 

As I said, I have no idea what the US South is like, and it very well could be worse.  But don't compare it to now.  I'm from Canada and winters here are generally laughable, but two years ago (2012-13) was pretty bad while this past one was mostly mild.  It changes.  I completely agree that the difference is that back home for winter we have things like heat, insulation, common sense and the urge to not open windows on the coldest days, which makes things work out better. 

My point is, don't let this mild summer fool you.  Korean summers are evil.  The Devil's greatest feat was convincing you that he doesn't exist.  Korean summer exists, and it is waiting for you to let your guard down.  The only way to beat it is to frolic in this wonderland of perpetual niceness and thank our Spring god for her generous bounty.