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Teaching => Middle-School => Lesson Plans, Ideas, & References => Middle School Textbook-Lessons => Topic started by: sheila on October 23, 2012, 05:16:50 pm

Title: Lesson 3: Piggy Banks
Post by: sheila on October 23, 2012, 05:16:50 pm
This is a thread for any lesson material for Ji Hak Sa Middle School English 3 Lesson 3: Piggy Banks.  Please share your contributions here. Be sure to explain exactly what you are posting and please do not post multi-level materials in this thread. Also, any review lessons or materials should be posted in the review section for this grade. If you can't find what you're looking for here, be sure to check back with the old thread for the entire book series http://www.waygook.org/index.php/topic,4935.0.html . Best of luck in your lesson planning!
Title: Re: Lesson 3: Piggy Banks
Post by: Enders on April 12, 2013, 02:26:28 pm
This is the lesson I am using next week. It is mostly from the one used last year plus some extras.

Covering:
Telephone conversations - leaving a message.
Replying to a question with certainly or with pleasure.

EDIT: Sorry forgot to attach the files the 1st time!!!
Title: Re: Lesson 3: Piggy Banks
Post by: presonance on April 17, 2013, 04:59:14 am
This is the lesson I am using next week. It is mostly from the one used last year plus some extras.

Covering:
Telephone conversations - leaving a message.
Replying to a question with certainly or with pleasure.

Sorry, did you forget to attach something?
Title: Re: Lesson 3: Piggy Banks
Post by: namerae on April 22, 2013, 10:19:44 am
Here are my materials from Grade 3, Lesson 3: Piggy Banks.
Adapted from the old Ji Hak Sa thread.

The Wazzup video works well with the Intro PPT and gets kids interested.

Activity RPS is pretty simple: In pairs, students will take turns drawing a piece of paper from the bags switching which bag they take from each round. The student who takes from the suggestion bag will read his paper followed by the student who took from the response bag. After they have said the English, the students flip over their papers. On the back side is a number (points) and a rock, paper, scissors symbol. Whoever has the winning symbol (rock beats scissors, scissors beats paper, paper beats rock) receives that number of points. If the students have the same symbol they must actually play rock paper scissors to determine the winner. Most points at the end wins. (paper can be put back into the bag to be reused). Students should tally their points on a piece of paper to determine the winner.

This was by far the best reaction to an activity that I've had thus far this year. :) Good luck!
Title: Re: Lesson 3: Piggy Banks
Post by: gaz on April 25, 2013, 09:36:15 am
listening and speaking parts of chpt 3. combination of stuff found on waygook plus my own 2 cents.
also used the wassup ad as an intro vid.
Title: Re: Lesson 3: Piggy Banks
Post by: KayceeATL on April 16, 2014, 10:19:23 am
I know this thread is ancient, but we are still using this text in my school. My school is pretty strict about sticking to the text but I sneak in outside stuff when I can.
I have not tried this out yet, but this is for Listening & Speaking portion of the lesson.

1. This worksheet attached provides various sentences/phrases that may be used in a phone dialogue.

**For lower levels, I would eliminate the amount of phrase options to choose from on the handout, as too many can get confusing.**

2. I will play the telephone game with my class as a warmer, and then go over some phone vocabulary together.

3. Next, we will go through this handout with a corresponding PPT to show how the conversation would go back and forth (PPT forthcoming).

4. Finally, I will have the students all choose a role out of a hat (i.e., Harry Potter, President Obama, a person who's lost, a police officer, etc.), and write a phone dialogue with a partner using the roles they've chosen and the handout as a guide.

I know this is teaching writing and I really don't teach that, but it should help with the speaking part somewhat.

Another idea but I am working out the logistics:

Have students practice leaving each other messages. First, try to gather as many recording devices as you can: MP3 players, digital recorders, laptops with microphones, tablets, etc.

Since most students won't have their phones, may have to use your own cellphone and/or laptop and this might take awhile. There are free Android recording apps for your phone if you don't have one yet. Perhaps ask your co-teacher to use his/her phone too.

If you have a large class, groups will share a device. Have students record their outgoing messages during Part A of the lesson, then students take turns leaving messages for their classmates during Part B. This works best if you give each student a specific reason for calling.

You can then play back the messages for comprehension checks or build worksheets around the recordings if you wish. Might be good for some laughs!

-Kaycee
Title: Re: Lesson 3: Piggy Banks
Post by: KayceeATL on April 16, 2014, 10:30:28 am
*another idea for the telephone etiquette portion of the lesson*
*have not tried it out yet, let me know if it works for you*

Mimic the Call

This might work great with beginners who are not yet familiar with common telephoning expressions and their appropriate intonation.

1. Play a telephone conversation while students read and mimic the call as it plays the goal is to follow the rhythm and copy the intonation to match the speakers in the audio. You can use the CD-ROM or have another fresh one.

2. Play the audio track again, but this time lower the volume, and then a third time with the volume even lower.

3. Play the track as many times as needed, till students are able to act out the situation comfortably without listening or reading.