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All about South Korea => Life in Korea => Topic started by: Koradian on December 28, 2010, 10:27:01 am

Title: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Koradian on December 28, 2010, 10:27:01 am
This will be my first attempt at teaching this class... please bear with me.

Attached you will find a picture of my boiler (heater) control panel. This boiler is probably the most common boiler found in Korea, especially in one-room apartments. I will explain how to use it as best I can. I've also attached the user’s manual but unless you are fluent in Korean then it's probably useless.

So here we go.

I assume you all already know how to at least turn on your boiler. The power button is located in top right corner. It's the red button that stands out from all others.


Below the power button is a green button. This button is to be pushed in when you wish to shower or only use hot water. If the light is on, your house is not being heated, but jump in the shower and you’ll be nice and toasty! Release this button and you will activate your floor heating. (The light in the upper left hand corner is the indicator showing that your boiler is heating up the water.)


Now that we have our floor heating activated, you’ll notice the temperature is displayed in large digits in the center of your console. If you look directly under these digits there are two more indicator lights. The indicator light on the left indicates the digits are displaying the water temperature, and the indicator on the right indicates the digits are displaying the room temperature. The temperature can be controlled with the larger of the three dials along the bottom.


The dial to the left of the temperature control dial (labeled ‘Water Temperature Control’ in the diagram) obviously controls the temperature of your water.  To switch between controlling the room temperature and water temperature simply push the button above the dial corresponding to the temperature you wish to control.

**NOTE**

You’ll notice on the Water Temperature Control dial that there is Korean written inbetween the temperature in degrees. These are settings recommened for each season. So, it reads like this:

40 – Summer – 60 – Spring/Fall – 70 – Winter – 80

You’ll notice that on my personal console that I have the temperature set at 40. It’s been at that setting for almost 5 years and I’ve always had boiling hot water. So, there may be no need to tamper with this setting.


Lastly is the “Cycle Time (in hours)’ dial located in the bottom right. This is for when you are leaving for extended periods of time. What this setting does is set your boiler to continuously turn on and off while you are away. So, for example, if you have it set on ‘4’, your boiler will turn on for 4 hours and then off for 4 hours, on for 4, off for 4, etc, etc.


I hope you enjoyed Boiler (Gas) Control 101. And again, seeing that this was my first attempt, fee free to reply with any questions!

Hope this helps!
Title: Re: Boiler (Gas) Control 101
Post by: karenology on December 28, 2010, 10:45:14 am
Thanks for this helpful lesson!  :) I knew about the green button, but sometimes it seems like it doesn't get the water as warm.  Maybe I ought to adjust the water temp dial, now that I know what it is. 
Title: Re: Boiler (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Koradian on December 28, 2010, 10:53:41 am
It usually takes 4-5 minutes for my water to heat up enough before I jump in the shower^^
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: tovarivera82 on December 28, 2010, 11:47:11 am
Thank you SO much! Seriously, I didn't even know what half of the dials and such meant, and I've lived here for two years!  :o

I'm including this info in my note for the next EPIK teacher. Thank you!!!  ;D
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Koradian on December 28, 2010, 11:56:39 am
You are more than welcome!

It's funny because I've been here more than 6 years and I still didn't know exactly what everything was meant to do. I have to give credit to one of my co-teachers for helping out^^
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: oculisorbis on December 28, 2010, 12:21:01 pm
Here's another manual for a different common control.  It's in English.  Some dont have the floor/air temp monitoring option, but everything else is basically the same.  The second file is in korean and is for the model that doesnt have the air temp monitor option, but as I said, they are pretty much identical except for that.
Title: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: miss_cho on January 12, 2012, 10:52:51 am
I'm leaving for 2 weeks on the 20th for a nice vacation somewhere warm but I am concerned about what I should do to keep my waterpipes from freezing. I live on the bottom floor of an apartment building and based on the average room temperature when the heat isn't on there's little to no insulation. It's not extremely cold here but it does drop below 0C most evenings. What have people done? Do you keep the floor heating on on the away button? Just let the water drip the entire two weeks?

I'm a little reluctant to leave the heating on because that seems incredibly expensive for 2 weeks. I don't want to come home to a 150,000-200,000 won gas bill! Any advice?
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: cdwyer on January 12, 2012, 11:06:43 am
While I'm not sure about your floor heating, I can tell you to leave your faucets on a low drip, both the kitchen and bathroom.  I would at least leave the heat on a low setting.  I remember coming home from vacation and the apartment would be freezing cold.  I know it's a price to pay, but it is worth it. 

Double check with your co-teacher or Korean friends about the heat, but def leave the water dripping. 
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: miss_cho on January 12, 2012, 12:03:31 pm
Rusty, have you ever left it on while you were on vacation? I'm trying to figure out how much to budget for it (I rarely use the ondol so up until now my biggest gas bill was 30,000 won).
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: Squire on January 12, 2012, 12:05:10 pm
Surely if you set your ondol to something like 10 degrees it'll not even kick in for a few days, but then eventually it will maintain a low temperature but not let the place get too cold. That's how mine works anyway
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: miss_cho on January 12, 2012, 12:07:53 pm
My ondol control won't allow me to set the temperature below 40 degrees celsius. :\  It's one of the reasons why I rarely use it, the air is a bit stifling when it's on.
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: justanotherwaygook on January 12, 2012, 12:09:20 pm
Play around with the settings.  The setting on mine is called 외출 ('going out').  It automatically sets to 8 degrees.
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: miss_cho on January 12, 2012, 12:18:19 pm
Ah! I have that setting - so it'll lower it down to 8 degrees? Good, I'll do that. Thank you!

Can anyone advise me on what the button circled in red is intended for? My co-teacher translated it as reservation but can't explain it's significance. Does it mean that it delays the start of the heater for the time set (30min or 1-4 hours)? It turns off the heater after the set time or the heater kicks on on a set schedule?

Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: miss_cho on January 12, 2012, 12:22:14 pm
My ondol control won't allow me to set the temperature below 40 degrees celsius. :\  It's one of the reasons why I rarely use it, the air is a bit stifling when it's on.

That's pretty mental. Are you sure that isn't the hot water temperature?


I'm not positive but I've messed around with the controls a bit and no matter what setting it's on it won't go below 40degrees celsius.
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: Davey on January 12, 2012, 01:55:50 pm
Ah! I have that setting - so it'll lower it down to 8 degrees? Good, I'll do that. Thank you!

Can anyone advise me on what the button circled in red is intended for? My co-teacher translated it as reservation but can't explain it's significance. Does it mean that it delays the start of the heater for the time set (30min or 1-4 hours)? It turns off the heater after the set time or the heater kicks on on a set schedule?

Turns off the heater.
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: miss_cho on January 12, 2012, 02:10:04 pm
Ah! I have that setting - so it'll lower it down to 8 degrees? Good, I'll do that. Thank you!

Can anyone advise me on what the button circled in red is intended for? My co-teacher translated it as reservation but can't explain it's significance. Does it mean that it delays the start of the heater for the time set (30min or 1-4 hours)? It turns off the heater after the set time or the heater kicks on on a set schedule?

Turns off the heater.

Thank you so much, I can work the control with a bit more confidence now. :)
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: furtakk on January 13, 2012, 07:04:44 pm
I have the exact same thermostat and also live in an older apartment where there's a risk of frozen pipes.

The circled button (예약) only allows you to preset the thermostat to shut off at a determined time (I think it goes up to 4 hours). Use the other button as the other poster suggested (외출) if you'll be out of the apartment for awhile.
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: zongal2012 on January 14, 2012, 10:05:29 am
I am on vacation now and have left my ondol on using the timer function. It heats the water to 60 degrees for 10 min every hour. (pipes freeze on a lower temperature)
Its going to be a bit of an expense when I return but its still cheaper than playing $2000 to fix burst pipes.  Where I live in Gangwondo the average max temp is -4 and minimum -14. Pipes do freeze all the time and I know a few NET's who have returned from a winter vacation with burst pipes and a hefty bill.

I would leave the heating on a low temp just to be sure.
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: tokkibunni on January 14, 2012, 10:50:06 am
I have that exact controller. I'm also going on vacation for four weeks. If i press the vacation mode button, do i just need to turn on my ondol heating or do i also turn on my water heating too?
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: Frozencat99 on January 15, 2012, 05:10:52 am
You only need to leave the water running, preferably warm/hot, at a speed that'll register with the ondol (that water is in use). Don't heat the space unnecessarily, it'll be a bill you don't need to pay and will greatly outweigh leaving the water running.

A lot of people in the mid-west US that lack basements do the same thing to avoid pipes freezing, so I trust its validity.
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: tokkibunni on January 15, 2012, 08:18:41 am
You only need to leave the water running, preferably warm/hot, at a speed that'll register with the ondol (that water is in use). Don't heat the space unnecessarily, it'll be a bill you don't need to pay and will greatly outweigh leaving the water running.

A lot of people in the mid-west US that lack basements do the same thing to avoid pipes freezing, so I trust its validity.

Well, the thing is I can't turn on vacation mode just for water. The ondol needs to be on for vacation mode to work :(
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: lotte world on January 15, 2012, 09:25:56 am
My ondol is set to 18 degrees.  The thermostat turns the boiler on and off to maintain this temperature.  It's not too cold, and not too stuffy.

If I turn on the hot water tap then hot water takes priority over the ondol.  The boiler turns on and heats the water for the hot tap.

When I go on vacation I will turn the thermostat down to 10 or 12 degrees.  This is much warmer than it needs to be to prevent freezing, but it's much easier than figuring out what all of the other buttons on the controller do, and I know it will work.  Plus, when I come back, it won't take so long to heat up the fabric of the apartment again.

You definitely should do something to prevent your pipes from freezing and bursting while you are away.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: bestoked on January 15, 2012, 10:19:11 am
quick question: If I accidentally left that green button engaged for the whole evening, does that mean my heater has been pumping heat to the water source all night?  ???  :o  :'(
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: lotte world on January 15, 2012, 02:29:55 pm
quick question: If I accidentally left that green button engaged for the whole evening, does that mean my heater has been pumping heat to the water source all night?  ???  :o  :'(

No.

Hot water is heated on demand.  If the water isn't running, the boiler isn't running.

The ondol runs either on a timer (20 minutes every 1 2 or 4 hours) or a thermostat.  When the ondol isn't running the boiler isn't.  You would have noticed if the room was getting hotter.
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: Frozencat99 on January 15, 2012, 10:55:50 pm
You only need to leave the water running, preferably warm/hot, at a speed that'll register with the ondol (that water is in use). Don't heat the space unnecessarily, it'll be a bill you don't need to pay and will greatly outweigh leaving the water running.

A lot of people in the mid-west US that lack basements do the same thing to avoid pipes freezing, so I trust its validity.

Well, the thing is I can't turn on vacation mode just for water. The ondol needs to be on for vacation mode to work :(

Oh, mine works like that, too. Vacation mode uses very little gas (at least for me) and my highest bill has been under 40k won. You don't need to use timers or anything like that, just keep vacation mode on. The third floor of my building has its pipes closest to the surface and earlier this month their pipes froze despite leaving the heat on at night. Now they're running their water (and making me slowly lose my mind when I bathe) and there hasn't been another incident.
Title: Re: Heating Your Home While You Travel
Post by: Squire on January 16, 2012, 04:36:09 am
I set my heating to 10 degrees or something a couple of days ago when I left, but it probably isn't necessary since I'm on the south coast. Time will tell.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Chalkie on January 20, 2012, 11:37:05 pm
Anyone got the dirt on the Lotte heating control panel?

It looks new.

I want to be able to swich off the floor heating in my kitchen to save power.

It has a grey power button on bottom right corner.

C.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Rothy on March 02, 2012, 10:26:05 am
I would absolutely advise people to leave their heating panel on a low setting when leaving to go on vacation during Winter. I went back to South Africa for a month- having turned off the heating in my apartment- and returned to a burst boiler, frozen water pipes, a freezing flooded apartment, and a 700,000 won bill two days later  :o Northern Hemisphere Problems!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: KuduPower on March 03, 2012, 10:09:35 pm
Anyone got the dirt on the Lotte heating control panel?

It looks new.

I want to be able to swich off the floor heating in my kitchen to save power.

It has a grey power button on bottom right corner.

C.

I think I have the same one. Temperature's in red numbers in the upper right with a set of 4 buttons on a curve corresponding to 4 lights?

Did you get around to figuring it out?
I've had two native relatives try and help me, but even they don't really get it. I'll talk to my building manager about it with my coteacher, and will gladly pass on the knowledge once I have it.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Chalkie on March 04, 2012, 11:04:34 am
Nope,

My last gas bill was 160 000. Ouch!

I just try to use it as little as possible..

Apparently, on some heater control functions you can switch off the floor-heating for the
kitchen and just have the livingroom heated, thus halving gas consumption.

How to do that on my heater controls remains a mystery..

Oh well, Winter is almost over.

I won't be here next Winter, ha ha, hooray!

Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: msjet85 on March 05, 2012, 02:50:25 pm
I am trying to view the attachment, sounds like this common heater is opposite of the one I have.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: twisleder on March 05, 2012, 03:17:15 pm
Thanks for this extremely useful post!  I think I have a slight correction about the timer function, however, at least as it relates to my apartment.

I believe that the boiler comes on for just a few minutes at a time every hour or two hours or what have you.  For instance, I have my timer set to four hours, and the boiler comes on for several minutes once every 4 hours.  This seems like a pretty efficient way to make sure that the apartment is reasonably warm when I get home at the end of the day (or when I wake up in the morning) without using too much gas.  Then again, I haven't gotten my first gas bill yet, so I can't swear to it!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Joltz on March 06, 2012, 07:21:16 am
 :o I'm pretty new here, but I can't seem to figure out how to look at the attachments, can anyone help me out?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: ac3824a on March 06, 2012, 08:19:07 am
I also have the Lotte heater, and I'm having trouble figuring it out.   Any luck?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: KuduPower on March 06, 2012, 09:08:34 pm
I also have the Lotte heater, and I'm having trouble figuring it out.   Any luck?

Hey Joey/Chalkie,

I've more or less figured it out, but it may change based on your boiler...

First of all, to create any sort of heat, water or floor, the boiler needs to be on. For me, it's a little red button that corresponds with a little green light when turned on.

The top two buttons, temp setting and heating/hot (google translation), let you change the minimum temperature you want your floor at. This is indicated by the second light going green.
When the third light is on, orange, that means you're adjusting the temperature of hot water only (how hot you want your shower/sink water to be, 70-75 is good enough for me).
When the top, first light is on [combustion/spread of fire] it means your boiler is actively working to build up/spread heat. Your main temp number will often shoot past your set temp in order to create enough heat to spread it out.

As for the timer, I keep it at the lowest, 01. This is because I could care less how cold my place is when I come home. This is also why I turn off the thermostat and boiler when I leave my place.

Hope this saves someone from nights similar to my first few, which I spent freezing in my room.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: wesman1988 on March 07, 2012, 03:21:42 pm
Thanks for this!  It's quite helpful.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Emer on March 08, 2012, 11:19:10 am
This is such a help! Thank you so much, I've been having lukewarm showers since arriving!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: yeahchristine! on March 08, 2012, 03:27:01 pm
I've been taking lukewarm showers these past few days, even after getting help (quasi-)figuring out the boiler system in my one room...considering going to 찜질방 soon so I can absorb more warmth
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: kookie on March 09, 2012, 09:47:52 am
This was a big help to me because unlike my most recent experience in Korea, I found myself unable to control the heat in my apartment. Thanks to a very friendly landlady and the help of her daughter, things have become much better for me and I am very pleased to be comfortable in my new home. Thanks so much for posting this!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: amos.rodriguez on March 15, 2012, 10:40:25 am
Thank you for all the information. I have had trouble with my boiler/heater control just like many others first arriving in Korea!  This has helped a great deal and I can now take hot showers! Lol thanks again and I will direct anyone else here who is having similar problems/issues!!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Glitch852 on March 28, 2012, 03:32:59 pm
This is quite possibly the most helpful thread ever. hahahah thanks very much! No one explained to me how to use this thing and I've been pushing buttons and trying to translate every word on this thing using google translate....=/
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: tmeinecke on March 29, 2012, 08:18:52 am
Oh wow, huge thanks for this.... I think you just made my mornings a bit more pleasant considering I've been taking cold showers my first week.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: teach peach on March 29, 2012, 02:47:34 pm
I hope you can help me with this.  My under-floor heating seems to be broken or something.   I turn it on the way the landlord showed me (and the same way my neighbour does his) but my room NEVER heats up.  I tried talking to my landlord but he doesnt seem to understand.  Are there any pipes or stuff I need to open?  This is really worrying me because i dont want to pay for something that isn't working. 
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: DamienWyldeRyan on March 29, 2012, 04:07:51 pm
I have a green light that comes on and then sometimes a red light... but I have yet to feel that warm feeling on the toes!!! not sure what I'm doing wrong!!! I'll check the manuals though... nice one!!!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: tmeinecke on March 29, 2012, 08:39:47 pm
I think I mightve spoke too soon.... my water will stay really hot for about 20 secs and then cool down to maybe room temperature at best for the remainder of it being on.... Pretty sure its my water heater and not me then
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Rocky Baptiste on April 20, 2012, 02:56:21 pm
Hi everyone. I'm a new arrival in Korea and was hoping someone might be able to help me out with the boiler in my apartment. I can figure out how to turn on the heating, but I'm a bit confused as to what exactly all the buttons on the control panel do. There are switches on either side off the control panel, each with 3 options (top, middle, bottom) and as far as I know the left switch is for water temperature and the right switch is for the heating settings. Other than that, on the front of the panel there's an 'on' button and another button that I'm not certain about. I've asked my co-teacher, but he said he was uncertain how to work the system, and my landlord speaks no English, so I'm a bit confused about the whole thing. I've done an online search, but haven't found anything to help me and what I have found is not in English.
The main problem that I can't figure out is how to heat the water without also turning on the floor heating. Everytime I have to take a shower the entire apartment is heated and it's probably going to end up costing me a fortune. Does anyone out there have the same boiler system or can anyone help me here. I've uploaded some pictures and would really appreciate some help or advice.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Fondue Knight on May 01, 2012, 08:27:22 am
Thank god for this thread. Last night was my first night in my apartment and my co-teacher didn't explain much of anything to me. All she suggested was that I turn the whole system off to save money. I don't have internet yet, so I just kept pushing buttons and ended up taking a scalding hot shower. The thing went up to 80 C. I think I might understand how it works now, though. I hope...
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: gidget on May 03, 2012, 05:32:25 pm
My control looks completely different. Does anyone have the one I use and if they do please can they tell me how it works. I'm too scared to touch anything but the power button.

I've attached a picture of it.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: sharchun on May 16, 2012, 11:06:38 pm
So that's what the green button was for! I always just turned everything on. Now, I know. Thanks!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: hwana on May 17, 2012, 10:20:06 am
My control looks completely different. Does anyone have the one I use and if they do please can they tell me how it works. I'm too scared to touch anything but the power button.

I've attached a picture of it.

You've probably figured it out by now, but just in case...

Top left switch: Floor heating AND hot water / Just hot water

Left hand dial: Floor heating temperature. The setting just below 50 (외출) is for when you leave your apartment. It maintains a low temperature to avoid the pipes freezing.

Bottom left button: Fast hot water (not really sure what this means... heats it up quicker somehow?)

Top right switch: Hot water temperature control (LOW / MID / HIGH)

Right hand dial: Floor heating timer. Can set the floor heating to turn off after a period of time (12 hours to 1 hour). The setting after 1 hour (연속) is for constant heat.

Bottom right button: Power!


As it's set up in the picture, your floor will heat up slightly every time you turn the power on as it's set to 외출 mode (the setting for when you leave your apartment). Until it starts to get cold again in winter it'd be best to move the top-left switch over to the right hand side, so it's only heating up hot water for the taps/shower.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: gmlmog009 on May 17, 2012, 03:13:59 pm
Thanks for this! I usually just switch it on the whole thing before I want to shower and then switch it off when I get out of the shower. My gas bill last month was 190 000won. This was before I knew that I had to pay gas bills. But I'm looking forward to getting home and trying this out.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: gidget on May 17, 2012, 07:41:55 pm
Thank you Thatkidpercy! Strangely enough, I got all the translations wrong and just gave up and set it back to the original setting you saw in the picture and used that. Turns out I have to run the water first before it'll start heating up.

I've changed all my sticky notes on the machine.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: UknowsI on May 19, 2012, 12:56:09 pm
Hi everyone. I'm a new arrival in Korea and was hoping someone might be able to help me out with the boiler in my apartment. I can figure out how to turn on the heating, but I'm a bit confused as to what exactly all the buttons on the control panel do. There are switches on either side off the control panel, each with 3 options (top, middle, bottom) and as far as I know the left switch is for water temperature and the right switch is for the heating settings. Other than that, on the front of the panel there's an 'on' button and another button that I'm not certain about. I've asked my co-teacher, but he said he was uncertain how to work the system, and my landlord speaks no English, so I'm a bit confused about the whole thing. I've done an online search, but haven't found anything to help me and what I have found is not in English.
The main problem that I can't figure out is how to heat the water without also turning on the floor heating. Everytime I have to take a shower the entire apartment is heated and it's probably going to end up costing me a fortune. Does anyone out there have the same boiler system or can anyone help me here. I've uploaded some pictures and would really appreciate some help or advice.
I have the same control as in your first picture. Left button pre-heats the water, so you can push it before you take a shower to get the water hot a little faster. I have the left switch on top and the right one in middle, and I don't have any problems with the ondol getting turned on.

I have another problem these days though. I get error ID 10 when I try to use it, and no warm water will come out. I can of course call a repair man, but if it's something I can fix myself, I would prefer if someone could explain what it means. If I turn it on and off again a few times it usually stop working again. I hear there are some simple problems like air in the valves we can fix ourself, so if that's the case I would like to know.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: blq2sdy on May 19, 2012, 10:48:23 pm
Hi everyone. I'm a new arrival in Korea and was hoping someone might be able to help me out with the boiler in my apartment. I can figure out how to turn on the heating, but I'm a bit confused as to what exactly all the buttons on the control panel do. There are switches on either side off the control panel, each with 3 options (top, middle, bottom) and as far as I know the left switch is for water temperature and the right switch is for the heating settings. Other than that, on the front of the panel there's an 'on' button and another button that I'm not certain about. I've asked my co-teacher, but he said he was uncertain how to work the system, and my landlord speaks no English, so I'm a bit confused about the whole thing. I've done an online search, but haven't found anything to help me and what I have found is not in English.
The main problem that I can't figure out is how to heat the water without also turning on the floor heating. Everytime I have to take a shower the entire apartment is heated and it's probably going to end up costing me a fortune. Does anyone out there have the same boiler system or can anyone help me here. I've uploaded some pictures and would really appreciate some help or advice.
I have the same control as in your first picture. Left button pre-heats the water, so you can push it before you take a shower to get the water hot a little faster. I have the left switch on top and the right one in middle, and I don't have any problems with the ondol getting turned on.

I have another problem these days though. I get error ID 10 when I try to use it, and no warm water will come out. I can of course call a repair man, but if it's something I can fix myself, I would prefer if someone could explain what it means. If I turn it on and off again a few times it usually stop working again. I hear there are some simple problems like air in the valves we can fix ourself, so if that's the case I would like to know.

What the heck?  That happens to me too!  It doesn't say error ID 10, it just shows either 01 or 03 then starts flashing and no hot water comes out!  I turn it off and on a couple of times and it starts working.  It's not really an issue...except when I forget and I get blasted in the face with frigid water haha :-/
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: flower girl on May 24, 2012, 08:31:18 pm
Im so confused!! None of these disruptions seem to match the control panel I have. (cant view the attachments, as haven't met the post requirements) When I moved in my co-teacher told me not to touch it and if I wanted to change anything I should ask my landlord-who doesn't speak any english. I was happy with that until I started reading about how you have to turn them on and off-I don't do this! Now i'm worried i'm going to get a large bill! Does any one else have a system that just stays on all the time?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: hwana on May 25, 2012, 07:10:40 am
Im so confused!! None of these disruptions seem to match the control panel I have. (cant view the attachments, as haven't met the post requirements)

You have enough posts now - if you can't find your model, why not post a picture of the panel here?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: rahfh on June 27, 2012, 08:11:58 am
Cold shower this morning  :(  Had a flashing 04 message on my control panel. Didnt stop for a pic, will have to do so later if I cant fix it. Tried the gas range, the gas was still flowing. Unplugged the heater, plugged it back in... and nothing, just goes back to a flashing 04. Bleak.
Title: Re: Life in Korea Apartment Guide (Washing Machine, Boiler, etc.)
Post by: gwangsan on June 29, 2012, 07:24:52 am
Every time I try to turn on my hot water, the 점검 (Google translated it as 'Check' if that helps) light keeps blinking and I can't get any hot water.
I just moved in a couple days ago and I'd rather not take cold showers for a year.

Any hints?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: rahfh on June 29, 2012, 11:11:34 am
Checked that the gas is on? Only suggest this because it happened to me... The outside and inside "taps" where off
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Jax.holmes on July 11, 2012, 01:01:58 pm
mine it totally different. it has 4 big buttons and and up and down arrow in the middle??

does anyone know how to use those- ive had cold showers for 2 days now :)
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: MetalWarrior on July 24, 2012, 02:29:59 pm
Sorry, but where do I find the attached picture?
Title: Help?!
Post by: Steph2012 on August 21, 2012, 07:54:01 pm
Thermostat image attached.

I searched. I looked. I've asked! Can anyone translate this for me? As it is right now, I turn the gas off to the water heater in order to stop the hot water because...when I heat water for the shower, the floor heat is also activated.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Help?!
Post by: lotte world on August 21, 2012, 08:52:08 pm
Thermostat image attached.

I searched. I looked. I've asked! Can anyone translate this for me? As it is right now, I turn the gas off to the water heater in order to stop the hot water because...when I heat water for the shower, the floor heat is also activated.

Thanks!

You might just need to press the white button, centre left, so that it's pushed in.

난방 is heating
온수 is hot water

Right now you want 온수 only, not 난방/온수.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: tipani on September 21, 2012, 07:26:04 pm
Thank you so much!!! I had no idea how to do anything with my heater/boiler
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: flaffl on October 21, 2012, 12:20:57 am
http://i.imgur.com/2sTc8.jpg

Hey guys, a quick question about my ondol. First off, it's a Daesung Celtic DSR-220 (if that clarification is needed) and I'm not too sure if it's been heating my floors in the first place. I know that the 난방 button needs to be pressed in order to turn on the heating, and the next thing that pops up is a flashing number. It starts with 25 Celsius and then jumps and doubles to 50 Celsius. I can't feel anything on 25 celsius but I definitely do on 50, but I know that if I turn it to 50, my gas bill is going to become a lot more expensive than it should be. Does anybody know how to control this damn thing and help me out a little better? Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: pitufina on December 06, 2012, 09:03:07 am
Hi. I need some help, I don't know how to set up my heater/boiler. Here's a picture of my controller. Thanks
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: seungc on February 22, 2013, 10:30:07 am
You mentioned that you should use the hourly settings when you are away on vacation (in the winter i presume). what setting should i leave it on for regular everyday heating to keep my apt moderately warm. the continuous setting? also, do you recommend keeping the 'water temp' or 'room temp' switched on for gas efficiency?

thanks,
Corey
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: skifflepop on March 05, 2013, 06:12:10 pm
http://i.imgur.com/2sTc8.jpg

Hey guys, a quick question about my ondol. First off, it's a Daesung Celtic DSR-220 (if that clarification is needed) and I'm not too sure if it's been heating my floors in the first place. I know that the 난방 button needs to be pressed in order to turn on the heating, and the next thing that pops up is a flashing number. It starts with 25 Celsius and then jumps and doubles to 50 Celsius. I can't feel anything on 25 celsius but I definitely do on 50, but I know that if I turn it to 50, my gas bill is going to become a lot more expensive than it should be. Does anybody know how to control this damn thing and help me out a little better? Thanks in advance!

This is mine too, but I can't feel anything, when it's set to 60, anyone know what i might be doing wrong, water heats fine, I just feel little in the way of under floor heat, and still worry that it's costing me loads bill-wise.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: msbketa on March 07, 2013, 09:35:34 am
That's what I have too.  The closest I could come to finding instructions was this:

http://eng.celtic.co.kr/eng/pdf/DSR-220.pdf

  I'm assuming the directions are the same even though there are symbols instead of hangul.  Hope that helps!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: philby1985 on October 08, 2013, 11:14:09 pm
My contribution

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=skYnDv8yDZM
Title: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: Cshoward on November 28, 2013, 09:18:21 am
Post your question here.

I'll start by asking, what is the most cost efficient way to use my heater?
Is it better to keep it on the "continuous" setting? or the "every 3hours/2hours/1hours" setting?

I live in an area where my pipes can freeze. What should I set it on when I go on vacation?

Any other useful information?
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: namerae on November 28, 2013, 09:37:34 am
My coworker told me that the 실내 setting is 1/2 ondol and water heater. If you have 도시 gas, it's the lowest energy setting you can use. After playing with it for two days, I agree. I crank it up to 26C, let it warm up, and before bed turn it to 24C. If the inside air gets colder than 24C, it will kick in and warm up the place again.

If you're going on vacation, I'd say put it on a lower temp (maybe 18C?) and walk away. No point in having frozen pipes and having to take a cold shower after a tropical vacation ;)
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: stemarty on November 28, 2013, 09:56:45 am
Post your question here.

I'll start by asking, what is the most cost efficient way to use my heater?


This all really depends on your budget. How much are you willing to pay for heat?

In my first year, I did the cheap route and was really conscious of my heat useage. I ended up spending Christmas and New Years in the hospital with a lung infection.

Now that i've been here 3 years when I think about it:
- It costed over $300 to heat my last house in Canada. So I don't really see the fear in paying $100 a month in Korea to be comfortable. And thats heating my main room and leaving it on for a few hours each day. (plus weekends on an off)

If you're in super savings mode:
- Dont use the heater. Bundle up on sweaters and blankets.
- Zone your apartment and heat the smallest room. Hibernate there. Turn it into a man cave. Put your bed, table, TV, gaming systems, computers, and books in there.
- Electric blankets are nice substitutes.
- Space heaters will suck a lot of electricity, but not as much as using heat all the time. 
- Put heat on for an hour until it warms up...then turn it off. Repeat when cold.

- Doing the automatic on/off system is a good idea if you can figure it out. My ondol is old so it never stays programmed properly.

Post your question here.

I live in an area where my pipes can freeze. What should I set it on when I go on vacation?

Keep your taps dripping. Make sure all the taps have a little bit of water dripping out.
Keep your boiler on "idle"

This will help (but not prevent) freezing pipes if there aren't many ppl living in your building
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: weigookin74 on November 28, 2013, 10:11:07 am
This depends on whether or not you are in a newer building built within the last several years.  Newer buildings with insulation will probably have these type of energy efficient heaters.  But, you might live in an older uninsulated building where the heater will run all the time and you could find a very shocking gas or electric bill.  Be careful of that.

If it's a newer insulated building, the system will shut off when the desired temperature is reached. 

However, if the daytime temperature is above 0, you can safely shut it off and pipes won't freeze.  Alwys leave it off in an older building.  In a newer building, you can leave it off too.  Won't make a big difference.  Only in January when you have a minor cold snap where the daytime high is below freezing (0 degrees), do you need to worry about the pipes freezing. 

In this situation, a newer building leave it on a low temperature while out.  In an older building, better to leave it off unless you are very rich and like paying money.  Just have to take your chances.  If owner chews you out about frozen pipes, chew him out for not upgrading his building to modern standards. 

Currently, I shut it off during the day.  In the evening, I set it around 20 or 21 degrees and turn it down to around 17 degrees (16 to 18ish) at night when going to bed.  Warm blankets keep down the need for so much heat and save money.  (I live in a newer efficient insulated building.)  I leave it on all day when it's below 0 for an extended time.  When I do leave it on during the day, it's usually on a low temperature.  (Maybe around 12 or 14 degrees.)
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: weigookin74 on November 28, 2013, 10:19:29 am
Post your question here.

I'll start by asking, what is the most cost efficient way to use my heater?


This all really depends on your budget. How much are you willing to pay for heat?

In my first year, I did the cheap route and was really conscious of my heat useage. I ended up spending Christmas and New Years in the hospital with a lung infection.


I feel for you there.  Sounds like you were in an older uninsulated building where the costs would have been ridiculous.  Those type of buildings are also susceptible to mold.  There's always so much humidity and moisture in the air here that no heating mixed with your carbon dioxide and water vapour gets stuck to the wallpaper that creates mold.  Breathing that sh!t in ain't good for your health.  A newer building well insulated won't have the mold issue.  Sadly, it seems many English teachers do get stuck in those older buildings. 
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: stemarty on November 28, 2013, 10:48:21 am
Post your question here.

I'll start by asking, what is the most cost efficient way to use my heater?


This all really depends on your budget. How much are you willing to pay for heat?

In my first year, I did the cheap route and was really conscious of my heat useage. I ended up spending Christmas and New Years in the hospital with a lung infection.


I feel for you there.  Sounds like you were in an older uninsulated building where the costs would have been ridiculous.  Those type of buildings are also susceptible to mold.  There's always so much humidity and moisture in the air here that no heating mixed with your carbon dioxide and water vapour gets stuck to the wallpaper that creates mold.  Breathing that sh!t in ain't good for your health.  A newer building well insulated won't have the mold issue.  Sadly, it seems many English teachers do get stuck in those older buildings.

Ah True. You got it.
Im in a really old building. Mold on the ceilings, pipes freeze in the winter (regardless if I have the taps running) and there is no insulation whatsoever. The pipes even run OUTSIDE.

weigookin is right, depending on where you live and what kind of building will definitely alter how you can convserve energy.

If you have a new building, follow others advice and you'll be fine...but if you have a building like mine then prepare for long cold nights, unless you're willing to pay $200+ a month.
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: YoungMin on November 28, 2013, 12:36:58 pm
If you're going away for vacation you'd be better off draining the water system in your apartment.

To drain the system, shut off the main valve and turn on every tap (both hot and cold lines) until water stops running.

When you return turn it back on and let each tap run until the pipes are full again.

No water in the pipes = no pipes freezing.
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: Space on November 28, 2013, 01:01:23 pm
If you're going away for vacation you'd be better off draining the water system in your apartment.

To drain the system, shut off the main valve and turn on every tap (both hot and cold lines) until water stops running.

When you return turn it back on and let each tap run until the pipes are full again.

No water in the pipes = no pipes freezing.

This seems like a good idea. What would it look like? and where is it usually kept?. I know where the gas valve is, and the electric switches are, but I don't recall ever seeing one for water.
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: philby1985 on November 28, 2013, 01:14:58 pm
Best way to save money, move into an apartment with triple glazed windows, but poor insulation between floors and let the apartment above you heat yours for free :)

I am yet to turn on my heater so far this winter  :evil:
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: acousticr on November 28, 2013, 01:17:23 pm
If you're going away for vacation you'd be better off draining the water system in your apartment.

To drain the system, shut off the main valve and turn on every tap (both hot and cold lines) until water stops running.

When you return turn it back on and let each tap run until the pipes are full again.

No water in the pipes = no pipes freezing.

This seems like a good idea. What would it look like? and where is it usually kept?. I know where the gas valve is, and the electric switches are, but I don't recall ever seeing one for water.

I think it'll be by your boiler. There was a valve under my boiler that I had to turn off when the landlord wanted to replace my boiler earlier this year. But that might be further along in the system than would be effective, I don't know.

As a general tip, add weather stripping to your doors at least. My door was extremely drafty. I've also put plastic on the sliding doors, but since I didn't want to put it on the windows (I wanted to be able to open them), the effect was pretty minimal.
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: Space on November 28, 2013, 01:22:58 pm
If you're going away for vacation you'd be better off draining the water system in your apartment.

To drain the system, shut off the main valve and turn on every tap (both hot and cold lines) until water stops running.

When you return turn it back on and let each tap run until the pipes are full again.

No water in the pipes = no pipes freezing.

This seems like a good idea. What would it look like? and where is it usually kept?. I know where the gas valve is, and the electric switches are, but I don't recall ever seeing one for water.

I think it'll be by your boiler. There was a valve under my boiler that I had to turn off when the landlord wanted to replace my boiler earlier this year. But that might be further along in the system than would be effective, I don't know.

As a general tip, add weather stripping to your doors at least. My door was extremely drafty. I've also put plastic on the sliding doors, but since I didn't want to put it on the windows (I wanted to be able to open them), the effect was pretty minimal.

Thanks, this is really good to know.
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: weigookin74 on November 28, 2013, 01:42:39 pm
Post your question here.

I'll start by asking, what is the most cost efficient way to use my heater?


This all really depends on your budget. How much are you willing to pay for heat?

In my first year, I did the cheap route and was really conscious of my heat useage. I ended up spending Christmas and New Years in the hospital with a lung infection.


I feel for you there.  Sounds like you were in an older uninsulated building where the costs would have been ridiculous.  Those type of buildings are also susceptible to mold.  There's always so much humidity and moisture in the air here that no heating mixed with your carbon dioxide and water vapour gets stuck to the wallpaper that creates mold.  Breathing that sh!t in ain't good for your health.  A newer building well insulated won't have the mold issue.  Sadly, it seems many English teachers do get stuck in those older buildings.

Ah True. You got it.
Im in a really old building. Mold on the ceilings, pipes freeze in the winter (regardless if I have the taps running) and there is no insulation whatsoever. The pipes even run OUTSIDE.

weigookin is right, depending on where you live and what kind of building will definitely alter how you can convserve energy.

If you have a new building, follow others advice and you'll be fine...but if you have a building like mine then prepare for long cold nights, unless you're willing to pay $200+ a month.

I lived in such a building before my current one.  It can be bad.  I used minimal heat, relied on heating blankets, heating fan (not lamp), etc.  My gas didn't even heat that well and it was more expensive than my new place.  A heating fan for one of your rooms will work wonders.  Electric bill if only used in a small space (room with doors closed) might be 100,000 won per month.  Find one of those at High Mart or some other place.  I'd almost consider using a dehumidifier but they weren't in Korea a few years ago when I lived there.  However, I don't know the cost of the electricity bill for those.  Back home in folks basements they were comparable to a monthly air con bill. 

Also, I think someone mentioned on here a while back the idea of removing the wallpaper and painting some kind of primer that was resistant to mold.  But, you'd have to get a Korean to call around for you on that one.  Not sure if it's real. 

I think these are things I'd consider if I had to live in an old building again.  I paid my own key money and got the rent allowance when I moved to my current town - hence the new place.  (If you're outside of Seoul, prices are reasonable.)  Something to consider if you know you're here long term. 



This is an example of a site from Daejeon.  (If you want to get your own place at some point.) 

http://www.방샵.com/?NVKWD=%EB%8C%80%EC%A0%84%EC%9B%90%EB%A3%B8&NVADKWD=%EB%8C%80%EC%A0%84%EC%9B%90%EB%A3%B8&NVAR=PL&NVADID=653092894+0J41000RPDngnQuc00lh

500/35 means  - 5 million won deposit and 350,000 won a month rent.  Seems like an expensive deposit for outside of Seoul but I'm sure there are others around.  Some of these stupid sites ask for your ID before you can search because they're stupid in the head or something.

Example of a search:

http://search.naver.com/search.naver?where=nexearch&query=%EB%8C%80%EC%A0%84%EC%9B%90%EB%A3%B8&sm=top_sug.pre&fbm=1&acr=1&acq=eowjsdnjsfna&qdt=0&ie=utf8




Whenever something broke in my old place the owner would never take resposibility for it and the local education office always had to find folks to fix things instead.  With my new place, the owner fixes it right away and is on the ball. 

So, I know it's off topic a bit.  But, I just wanted to let some of you know there are options out there. 
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: Row on December 04, 2013, 04:43:00 pm
When I I turn on the ondol it doesn't go lower than 40C, is that normal? What can I expect to pay a month in a small apartment if I had it at that level 24/7?
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: acousticr on December 05, 2013, 07:30:42 am
When I I turn on the ondol it doesn't go lower than 40C, is that normal? What can I expect to pay a month in a small apartment if I had it at that level 24/7?

It sounds like that's the temperature that the water gets heated to, not the temperature the room will be. Are there other buttons on the control? On my current unit, I can toggle through three settings with one of the buttons, on the old one it was a button for each. The old one - I don't remember what the settings were called, but on this one, I get the setting 실내 and that's where I can adjust the temperature for the room. If I go straight to the higher temperature display, I'm pretty sure I'm only getting hot water for showering/doing dishes, not heating the room.
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: YoungMin on December 05, 2013, 09:40:14 am
When I I turn on the ondol it doesn't go lower than 40C, is that normal? What can I expect to pay a month in a small apartment if I had it at that level 24/7?

About ₩1,000,000,000 a month.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: spooninmypocket on December 14, 2013, 05:39:11 pm
(http://m.kdnavien.co.kr/upload/product/201109301536021_E.jpg)

Hello!

I've been looking for instructions on using the navien NR-15S, A/S 1588-1144  heating/heater controller I have but didn't find it here so here is a link to English instructions I managed to find elsewhere:

http://m.kdnavien.co.kr/roomcon/RoomConView.asp?SEQ=85&cmd=V&TTYPE=RC&sch_stype=&sch_sval=&page=1&

Although it's English the translation is terrible and I'm having trouble figuring out what it ACTUALLY means - can anyone with some experience who is better able to read between the lines/figure it out shed some light?

This is also a video demonstration on using it but it's in Korean:
http://www.youtube.com/v/3PgXlrEvtHo?version=3&hl=ko_KR&rel=0

Some other questions too:
1. I have TWO valve/turning knob things under my sink - what are they each for? I saw a video about the gas saying you only have to turn these knobs a little way on to get it to work and if you open it fully your place gets no warmer but your bill is much higher. SO I wanted to know what they were before I go changing what they're turned to. (I've attached a picture)

2. What's the most cost effective way to keep your place warm - my coteacher had told me to turn the thermostat/thing off when I'm not using it because it's expensive (I live on an Island so it's especially bad here apparently), but my mum says I'm spending MORE money doing that because it'll cost more to keep heating it up from being 12C when I get home from work than it would be to just leave it on all the time and let it maintain a temperature instead.

3. When I go away over winter, what's the most cost effective and ACTUALLY effective way to keep pipes from freezing etc? I intend to leave my taps on but should I leave them dripping HOT water? What about heating the room - if my controls have a "vacation mode" - what does that ACTUALLY mean my heating will do? If I don't, what should I do - is it better  to leave my thermostat on the whole time but set at a low temperature (in the sense that I assume it only kicks in to maintain temp when it drops too low) using the degrees celcius option? Or use the (I assume) timer option (which I don't actually understand how it works based on that terrible translation)? Or what I THINK looks like an option for controlling the temperature of the water in the pipes (how does that work too??)? Is one method of heating more expensive than others?

THanks for any and all clarification you can give me =)
Title: Korean Thermostat!
Post by: Korian31 on December 25, 2013, 02:48:15 pm
Hi guys, attached is a picture of my thermostat. If someone is able to translate, can you please do your best to let me know what means what! My school director explained it but he speaks very little English.

My thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Korean Thermostat!
Post by: a87 on December 25, 2013, 06:15:05 pm
Hey welcome, if you use the search function you should be able to find similar threads where there are pictures of thermostats labeled in English, as this is a pretty frequent question.

Also, time to start learning Korean.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: matador on December 26, 2013, 05:38:48 pm
Nope,

My last gas bill was 160 000. Ouch!

I just try to use it as little as possible..

Apparently, on some heater control functions you can switch off the floor-heating for the
kitchen and just have the livingroom heated, thus halving gas consumption.

How to do that on my heater controls remains a mystery..

Oh well, Winter is almost over.

I won't be here next Winter, ha ha, hooray!

Did you figure out how to cut off the ondol floor heating in certain parts of your apartment with your ondol?

Also,I have the original ondol with a different brand name,is is possible to do this?

On page 43 of the user manual on the first page of this thread,there is  a pic showing the boiler with pipes numbered 1 to 5.Can someone translate what the numbers represent?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: kimjones on December 27, 2013, 07:06:25 am
I think it depends on the place, but in my apartment, there are valves under the sink that correspond to the different rooms.  I just leave one room on as that's the room I usually stay in and sleep in.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: itsannayo on November 11, 2014, 06:19:12 pm
Hi,

My apartments ondol/boiler controller is different from the ones on here. I've attached a couple pictures of it. The first picture, as you can see, is turned off and the second picture is when it's on. The lights for the ondol or boiller doesn't light up for some reason. I suspect it being broken or maybe loose wire. The third picture is of the setting on the boiler itself. The red digits are 35 and 28, supposed to be temperatures of some sort.

Could anyone help me how to use this controller? Do I need to contact my landlord about it?

Much appreciated.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: weigookin74 on November 14, 2014, 01:48:51 pm
Hi,

My apartments ondol/boiler controller is different from the ones on here. I've attached a couple pictures of it. The first picture, as you can see, is turned off and the second picture is when it's on. The lights for the ondol or boiller doesn't light up for some reason. I suspect it being broken or maybe loose wire. The third picture is of the setting on the boiler itself. The red digits are 35 and 28, supposed to be temperatures of some sort.

Could anyone help me how to use this controller? Do I need to contact my landlord about it?

Much appreciated.

Is your heat electric?  I've never seen a heater with a switch like this.  But Nan Bang is heater and maybe the other is hot water?  As for the one at the bottom?  Is that in your bathroom or balcony area?  Looks like some electric regulator?  The bottom right hand side gives an option to choose.  (Choose what?  Not sure.)  Asking a Korean might be more helpful than asking us waygooks. 
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: itsannayo on December 21, 2014, 02:59:47 pm
Hi,

My apartments ondol/boiler controller is different from the ones on here. I've attached a couple pictures of it. The first picture, as you can see, is turned off and the second picture is when it's on. The lights for the ondol or boiller doesn't light up for some reason. I suspect it being broken or maybe loose wire. The third picture is of the setting on the boiler itself. The red digits are 35 and 28, supposed to be temperatures of some sort.

Could anyone help me how to use this controller? Do I need to contact my landlord about it?

Much appreciated.

Is your heat electric?  I've never seen a heater with a switch like this.  But Nan Bang is heater and maybe the other is hot water?  As for the one at the bottom?  Is that in your bathroom or balcony area?  Looks like some electric regulator?  The bottom right hand side gives an option to choose.  (Choose what?  Not sure.)  Asking a Korean might be more helpful than asking us waygooks.

It's located in the balcony area.  I asked my Co-Teacher about it and it's suppose to be a night boiler (?), like it only turns on a certain time of the nght. But hot water still doesn't come out.  :cry: Thanks though!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: johnny russian on December 21, 2014, 03:16:58 pm
Hi,

My apartments ondol/boiler controller is different from the ones on here. I've attached a couple pictures of it. The first picture, as you can see, is turned off and the second picture is when it's on. The lights for the ondol or boiller doesn't light up for some reason. I suspect it being broken or maybe loose wire. The third picture is of the setting on the boiler itself. The red digits are 35 and 28, supposed to be temperatures of some sort.

Could anyone help me how to use this controller? Do I need to contact my landlord about it?

Much appreciated.

Is your heat electric?  I've never seen a heater with a switch like this.  But Nan Bang is heater and maybe the other is hot water?  As for the one at the bottom?  Is that in your bathroom or balcony area?  Looks like some electric regulator?  The bottom right hand side gives an option to choose.  (Choose what?  Not sure.)  Asking a Korean might be more helpful than asking us waygooks.

It's located in the balcony area.  I asked my Co-Teacher about it and it's suppose to be a night boiler (?), like it only turns on a certain time of the nght. But hot water still doesn't come out.  :cry: Thanks though!

yeah i've never seen a heating unit like that. have you not managed to get the ondol or hot water turned on at all? it's getting damn cold now!

i would suggest you get your co-teacher to speak to the building manager/building admin office to explain how it works. if need be your co-teacher will have to come to your apartment with you during lunchtime to explain how it works with the building manager.

i think this is one thing you should really hound them about. you can't go the whole winter without heating and hot water.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: plan b on December 23, 2014, 03:25:24 pm
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: ChrisKorea on December 24, 2014, 06:26:57 am
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

I would like some help with this too. Anyone know what to do?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: 한소로 on December 24, 2014, 07:45:50 am
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

If you just turn the right knob all the way left towards minus, that's the "Out" setting. It will keep the ondol on but at the lowest possible setting.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Yaya on December 24, 2014, 08:12:28 am
Hi guys! I have this model (just stole the pic from earlier in the thread so ignore the red circle this time).

Recently my water hasn't been heating up properly, but my floor heating works perfectly. If I leave my water and floor heating on for a couple hours I manage to have a lukewarm shower which fluctuates between warm and freezing cold every few seconds. I've tried everything, including pushing all the buttons to see if it helps.

Does anybody know what might be wrong?
Also, am I supposed to leave the hot water on all day or turn it off when not in use?

Please help!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: pkjh on December 24, 2014, 08:22:45 am
Hi guys! I have this model (just stole the pic from earlier in the thread so ignore the red circle this time).

Recently my water hasn't been heating up properly, but my floor heating works perfectly. If I leave my water and floor heating on for a couple hours I manage to have a lukewarm shower which fluctuates between warm and freezing cold every few seconds. I've tried everything, including pushing all the buttons to see if it helps.

Does anybody know what might be wrong?
Also, am I supposed to leave the hot water on all day or turn it off when not in use?

Please help!
The two buttons on the right control the hot water. The bottom one is the temperature, the top one I think turns it on. The 수 means water in Chinese/formal Korean. It's probably in Celsius, so as a guide remember 100 C is boiling, 0 C is when water freezes.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Yaya on December 24, 2014, 08:27:00 am
Hi guys! I have this model (just stole the pic from earlier in the thread so ignore the red circle this time).

Recently my water hasn't been heating up properly, but my floor heating works perfectly. If I leave my water and floor heating on for a couple hours I manage to have a lukewarm shower which fluctuates between warm and freezing cold every few seconds. I've tried everything, including pushing all the buttons to see if it helps.

Does anybody know what might be wrong?
Also, am I supposed to leave the hot water on all day or turn it off when not in use?

Please help!
The two buttons on the right control the hot water. The bottom one is the temperature, the top one I think turns it on. The 수 means water in Chinese/formal Korean. It's probably in Celsius, so as a guide remember 100 C is boiling, 0 C is when water freezes.

Yes, the lower button on the right controls water heat, I have it on maximum (3 bars on the right side of the screen). The temperature on the screen applies to the floor heating.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: johnny russian on December 24, 2014, 09:24:52 am
Hi guys! I have this model (just stole the pic from earlier in the thread so ignore the red circle this time).

Recently my water hasn't been heating up properly, but my floor heating works perfectly. If I leave my water and floor heating on for a couple hours I manage to have a lukewarm shower which fluctuates between warm and freezing cold every few seconds. I've tried everything, including pushing all the buttons to see if it helps.

Does anybody know what might be wrong?
Also, am I supposed to leave the hot water on all day or turn it off when not in use?

Please help!

You shouldn't have your ondol on and shower at the same time, otherwise the two are competing for hot water. Try turning your ondol off for a bit before showering.

Some showers can also be notoriously temperamental. I had the same problem as you, and realized it was caused by having the handle all the way up for maximum water flow. If i push the handle half way up, i have no problems.

If none of those work get your building maintainence people to have a look at your boiler, there may be a problem with it.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: ChrisKorea on December 24, 2014, 09:42:15 am
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

If you just turn the right knob all the way left towards minus, that's the "Out" setting. It will keep the ondol on but at the lowest possible setting.

Sorry for potentially stupid question, but the left knob should be turned to the ondol setting, right?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: 한소로 on December 24, 2014, 01:06:15 pm
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

If you just turn the right knob all the way left towards minus, that's the "Out" setting. It will keep the ondol on but at the lowest possible setting.

Sorry for potentially stupid question, but the left knob should be turned to the ondol setting, right?

No worries. Yes, bottom left.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: hick on January 13, 2015, 02:58:08 pm
thanks for the advice!
I'll turn on the 외출 when i leave but do i need to turn on the hot water also?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Mezoti97 on January 13, 2015, 03:19:23 pm
thanks for the advice!
I'll turn on the 외출 when i leave but do i need to turn on the hot water also?

I don't think so. I think just letting the tap drip should suffice.
Title: Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
Post by: pkjh on January 14, 2015, 08:38:36 am
When I I turn on the ondol it doesn't go lower than 40C, is that normal? What can I expect to pay a month in a small apartment if I had it at that level 24/7?

About ₩1,000,000,000 a month.
I keep mine on once the average temps get below 15 C. It ranges from 60,000 to 120,000 won a month from oct/nov to march/april. The other half of the year I usually pay around 20,000-won. I don't use any electric blankets, or heaters, or long johns.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: snorske on March 03, 2015, 09:37:25 pm
(http://m.kdnavien.co.kr/upload/product/201109301536021_E.jpg)

Hello!

I've been looking for instructions on using the navien NR-15S, A/S 1588-1144  heating/heater controller I have but didn't find it here so here is a link to English instructions I managed to find elsewhere:

http://m.kdnavien.co.kr/roomcon/RoomConView.asp?SEQ=85&cmd=V&TTYPE=RC&sch_stype=&sch_sval=&page=1&

Although it's English the translation is terrible and I'm having trouble figuring out what it ACTUALLY means - can anyone with some experience who is better able to read between the lines/figure it out shed some light?

This is also a video demonstration on using it but it's in Korean:
http://www.youtube.com/v/3PgXlrEvtHo?version=3&hl=ko_KR&rel=0

Some other questions too:
1. I have TWO valve/turning knob things under my sink - what are they each for? I saw a video about the gas saying you only have to turn these knobs a little way on to get it to work and if you open it fully your place gets no warmer but your bill is much higher. SO I wanted to know what they were before I go changing what they're turned to. (I've attached a picture)

2. What's the most cost effective way to keep your place warm - my coteacher had told me to turn the thermostat/thing off when I'm not using it because it's expensive (I live on an Island so it's especially bad here apparently), but my mum says I'm spending MORE money doing that because it'll cost more to keep heating it up from being 12C when I get home from work than it would be to just leave it on all the time and let it maintain a temperature instead.

3. When I go away over winter, what's the most cost effective and ACTUALLY effective way to keep pipes from freezing etc? I intend to leave my taps on but should I leave them dripping HOT water? What about heating the room - if my controls have a "vacation mode" - what does that ACTUALLY mean my heating will do? If I don't, what should I do - is it better  to leave my thermostat on the whole time but set at a low temperature (in the sense that I assume it only kicks in to maintain temp when it drops too low) using the degrees celcius option? Or use the (I assume) timer option (which I don't actually understand how it works based on that terrible translation)? Or what I THINK looks like an option for controlling the temperature of the water in the pipes (how does that work too??)? Is one method of heating more expensive than others?

THanks for any and all clarification you can give me =)

i have this same controller 나비엔 NR-15SB and was wondering exactly how the "예약 - timer" setting works. You can choose 0-12 hours in 1 hour intervals.  Does this mean if you set it to "2" that it simply turns off after 2 hours?

Here is the korean explanation, but I'm confused on the translation:  예약난방은 난방 정지시간을 예약하는 기능으로 0~12시간 중 원하는 예약시간을 설정하면 30분간 난방한 후 예약시간 만큼 난방이 정지되고 다시 난방을 반복하는 기능입니다

thanks!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: hctong on November 24, 2015, 07:58:13 am
stupid questions but what exactly is the difference between ondol and shilneh?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Horsey on November 24, 2015, 11:49:43 am
Anyone know why the floor won't heat up well, although the tap water is perfectly hot?

It's been the case in every flat I've occupied. I even had my boiler replaced this month so that isn't it. Maybe just luck of the draw?

Everyone else seems to live in apartments where the floor gets very warm to the touch. But if I blast my ondol at 80 degrees for hours, it's just lukewarm in patches and cold in the rest.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: emmas28 on January 07, 2016, 09:30:47 am
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: jamonamagnet on January 07, 2016, 12:13:29 pm
I just leave mine on the same setting when I am there, but I turn down the thermostat to something low, like 16 degrees.  So the heating comes on and off as normal, but the rooms are not so hot.  This means that the pipes won't freeze, and also the apt. is not super-cold when I return.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: weigookin74 on January 07, 2016, 12:19:35 pm
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!

Geeze you're not kidding.  I checked the temps for tomorrow.Down south it's 6 degrees in the afternoon with a low of minus 2 overnight.  In Chuncheon, it's a high of 2 and an overnight low of minus 12.  I never thought the diferences were that much in such a small country.  (Actually not that cold to me either, but colder thn downsouth.  Though I'd take it if it meant dry air instead of foggy or damp air sometimes.)  If the temps or temps with the wind chills are below 0, use the away setting or if no away setting, then just keep it on a low temperature.  If it's above 0 by quite a bit and down near 0 or only minus 2 at night, turn it off and don't bother.  Only when it's prolonged below 0 for a long time do you need to worry about freezing pipes. Otherwise, save your money. 
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: damocha on January 07, 2016, 01:06:08 pm
I have a similar system as Snorske. I watched the video a few months ago with my Korean friend and he explained the functions to me.

The bottom right button (전원) turns the unit on and off. When the unit turns on, you should see the words 실내 (interior) on the left and 현재언도 (current temperature) above the temperature (the left side of the curvy line.)

If you want to adjust the temperature, press the + or - buttons. You will see the numbers go up or down accordingly. You will also see the words above the temperature change to 희망언도 (set temperature / temperature you want. This is the right side of the curvy line above the numbers.)

If your set temperature is higher than the current temperature, a green light will appear and you should hear your boiler kick on after a few seconds. The temperature will also return to display the current temperature (현재언도.)

This setting is much like the ones I've used at home. You set a temperature and the thermostat will kick on when the room temperature is below the set temperature. When the room temp reaches the desired temperature, the thermostat turns off. However, every time I have used it, it does not work as well as the ones back home. My room could be set for 20 degrees and my actual room temperature reads 23 with the boiler still running. Even my Korean friends say that this method isn't reliable.

The top right button (온수) controls the temperature for the water. When you press it, you will see something that looks like a bar graph on the screen. It will add a bar each time you push it, meaning the water temperature will be hotter. There is not really any reason to have it on more than one bar as the water still gets plenty hot on one bar.

The top left button (난방)  toggles your boiler between a thermostat, ondol, and timer. BE CAREFUL WITH THIS BUTTON. When you first turn your unit on, it should be set as a thermostat. The word on the left side should say 실내 and is located above the weird line.

If you press the 난방 button once, the word on the left changes to 온돌 (ondol) and is located in the middle of the weird lines. This setting is like a jimjilbang bath house. The temperature will set itself to 65 CELCIUS (149 Fahrenheit). I made the mistake of falling asleep with this setting once and woke up sweating my ass off.

If you press the 난방 button a second time, the words change to 예약 (lit. reservation AKA timer) and is located under the weird line. When you use this setting, you will see the numbers in the single or low double digits along with the word 시간 (hour) beside it. This will allow you to set your heater on a timer.

For example, if you set the time for 04 hours, the heater will kick on every 4 hours and stops automatically after awhile. The temperature of the room will not matter. The heater should start up every 4 hours if you use this setting. If you find yourself too hot, increase the time. If you are too cold, decrease it.

My Korean friend said that before helping me understand the boiler, he and his wife only turned it on and off. Afterwards, they used the timer setting. He said they set the temperature for 6 hours and left it on even when they slept or went to work. They said their gas bill was reduced after using this setting. Last month, they paid 66,000 won which his wife said was "very reasonable."

The lower left button 외출 (away) is what you are supposed to use when you leave for long periods of time. Does that mean when you go to work? When you go on vacation? I have no idea. I never use it. Neither do my Korean friends. Then again, I live in the southern part of the peninsula so I don't worry much about my pipes freezing.

Hope this is helpful.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: emmas28 on January 08, 2016, 03:24:07 pm
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!

Geeze you're not kidding.  I checked the temps for tomorrow.Down south it's 6 degrees in the afternoon with a low of minus 2 overnight.  In Chuncheon, it's a high of 2 and an overnight low of minus 12.  I never thought the diferences were that much in such a small country.  (Actually not that cold to me either, but colder thn downsouth.  Though I'd take it if it meant dry air instead of foggy or damp air sometimes.)  If the temps or temps with the wind chills are below 0, use the away setting or if no away setting, then just keep it on a low temperature.  If it's above 0 by quite a bit and down near 0 or only minus 2 at night, turn it off and don't bother.  Only when it's prolonged below 0 for a long time do you need to worry about freezing pipes. Otherwise, save your money.

Haha no I wasn't! I'm up in the mountains so it's even colder than Chuncheon. I'll leave it on the away setting and fingers crossed all will be well   :smiley:
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: weigookin74 on January 12, 2016, 12:29:04 pm
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!

Geeze you're not kidding.  I checked the temps for tomorrow.Down south it's 6 degrees in the afternoon with a low of minus 2 overnight.  In Chuncheon, it's a high of 2 and an overnight low of minus 12.  I never thought the diferences were that much in such a small country.  (Actually not that cold to me either, but colder thn downsouth.  Though I'd take it if it meant dry air instead of foggy or damp air sometimes.)  If the temps or temps with the wind chills are below 0, use the away setting or if no away setting, then just keep it on a low temperature.  If it's above 0 by quite a bit and down near 0 or only minus 2 at night, turn it off and don't bother.  Only when it's prolonged below 0 for a long time do you need to worry about freezing pipes. Otherwise, save your money.

Haha no I wasn't! I'm up in the mountains so it's even colder than Chuncheon. I'll leave it on the away setting and fingers crossed all will be well   :smiley:

That's probably wise of you to do that.  Should be ok then.  The next week or so will be the coldest time of year here.  Just curious, how is that place in the summer?  Is it more dry and cool or still hot and humid up there? 
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: emmas28 on January 25, 2016, 01:00:31 pm
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!

Geeze you're not kidding.  I checked the temps for tomorrow.Down south it's 6 degrees in the afternoon with a low of minus 2 overnight.  In Chuncheon, it's a high of 2 and an overnight low of minus 12.  I never thought the diferences were that much in such a small country.  (Actually not that cold to me either, but colder thn downsouth.  Though I'd take it if it meant dry air instead of foggy or damp air sometimes.)  If the temps or temps with the wind chills are below 0, use the away setting or if no away setting, then just keep it on a low temperature.  If it's above 0 by quite a bit and down near 0 or only minus 2 at night, turn it off and don't bother.  Only when it's prolonged below 0 for a long time do you need to worry about freezing pipes. Otherwise, save your money.

Haha no I wasn't! I'm up in the mountains so it's even colder than Chuncheon. I'll leave it on the away setting and fingers crossed all will be well   :smiley:

That's probably wise of you to do that.  Should be ok then.  The next week or so will be the coldest time of year here.  Just curious, how is that place in the summer?  Is it more dry and cool or still hot and humid up there?

I arrived in August last year and it was hot! It's not so humid though because of the altitude and open air but thank god for air con nevertheless.

Oh, and the pipes seemed to have survived the below 18C we had while I was away  ;D
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: gidget on December 05, 2016, 09:17:12 pm
Today I got home to find my boiler had the red 물보충 light on. I fixed it thanks to google and Rinnai youtube videos but I want to know how a boiler runs out of water in the first place?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Piggydee on December 06, 2016, 09:51:23 am

The lower left button 외출 (away) is what you are supposed to use when you leave for long periods of time. Does that mean when you go to work? When you go on vacation? I have no idea. I never use it. Neither do my Korean friends. Then again, I live in the southern part of the peninsula so I don't worry much about my pipes freezing.

Hope this is helpful.

Great advice!  And I do have to say you should leave it on 외출 even when you go to school or vacation.  It keeps the boiler from freezing.  And as someone who has meet three foreigners who've had to pay for frozen boilers, it's not a cheap thing to replace.   Now yes I have been told by a few Koreans that you can just turn off the entire system it doesn't matter.  However, they probably don't know how to use their boiler either.  So I'm not going to trust turning it off and risk having to pay 500,000won later to my landlord just because one of my Korean friends gave me bad advice. 
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: SaintsCanada on December 09, 2016, 07:54:39 am
stupid questions but what exactly is the difference between ondol and shilneh?

Shilnae means temperature of the room. If your thermostat shows two different shilnae and ondol temperatures, ondol is the water temperature in the pipes, while shilnae is the actual/desired temperature of the room.
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: cpage4 on April 11, 2018, 10:34:14 am
My water is not getting hot. No matter what i try. It gets warm and then cold again....What can I do?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: fka on November 18, 2019, 05:24:09 pm
Boring boiler question here...

Since I moved into my place, it's always released a bit of a sulphuric smell when active, which goes away when the boiler's dormant. I know that the obvious response to this is "Oh my god! A leak!" but the obvious conclusion may not be the correct one. Someone did check the boiler a few months ago and didn't detect anything (admittedly, the gas could've been off for a few hours - I can't remember). Apparently there's an anaerobic bacteria that can grow in boilers that gives off this smell, particularly when the conditions are dark and poorly ventilated, which is true of my boiler closet. Another thing that's keeping me reasonably calm about this is the fact that the kitchen cooker gas doesn't have the distinctive gassy smell - usually the "rotten egg" smell is added by gas companies to warn of gas leaks. I'm not sure if this happens in Korea, but in any case, the gas in the kitchen doesn't smell like the boiler closet. Finally, this has been going on for a long time, and if there were a serious problem I think I'd have felt the impact more directly by now (though I'm also worried that I've subjected myself to some kind of slow poisoning).

I'm ordering a carbon monoxide detector from GMarket, but wondered if anyone else has had a similar issue here in Korea. I'm not sure how useful advice from the US or UK is likely to be.

Thanks!

Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Piggydee on November 20, 2019, 07:41:34 am
I turned off my boiler and put it on 외출 but then it dropped down to 16C  I decided this morning to leave it on 실내 and put the 희망 temp to 20 in hopes it will catch up.  Is there a problem with that or my boiler?
Title: Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
Post by: Lazio on November 20, 2019, 09:10:54 pm
I turned off my boiler and put it on 외출 but then it dropped down to 16C  I decided this morning to leave it on 실내 and put the 희망 temp to 20 in hopes it will catch up.  Is there a problem with that or my boiler?

On 외출 setting, your boiler will not do any meaningful heating. It will run periodically for a bit to pump some warm water through the pipes, making sure that the water in them wouldn't freeze. But this is not enough to warm up the floor so it wouldn't make a positive difference in the room temperature. Some boiler control panels allow to set a minimum temperature as well on 외출 setting. That way it would do the same freezing preventing runs, and also maintain the set temperature by running for a longer period if the room temp. dips below the set temp.