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All about South Korea => Life in Korea => Topic started by: Aristocrat on July 11, 2019, 03:14:32 pm

Title: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Aristocrat on July 11, 2019, 03:14:32 pm
Surfing:

In my youth, I participated in a few comps back home and I'm still a pretty solid shortboarder.
Yes, there are surf spots in the ROK, but after spending years trying to keep up the hobby, I've decided to suspend it as long as I'm in Korea. The waves here are incredibly inconsistent, sub-par, at best, unpredictable and very far from where I stay. I'd say a good 85% of my surf trips end in disappointment. I've resigned to focusing on track and gym to get a bit of an adrenaline fix and keep myself strong and conditioned for when I go home.

Tennis:

I live in a small city where the foreigners aren't interested in tennis and the only way to play regularly would be to join a club. I tried a few places and found it to be filled with some of the most arrogant, cliquey, snobs
I've ever come across. They're also old farts and not interested in playing singles . What makes things worse is that the membership fee is about 300k a month! 300k a month to play on a crappy piece of astroturf. No thanks.

Fishkeeping:

I've recently discovered how relaxing watching aquascaping videos are and I decided to buy a little 30lit tank
to take up the hobby again, I kept fish as a kid. I'd love to get a 120 gallon high-tech tank, but obviously that's not practical right now and will have to wait till I buy a place back home. I found a nice little local aquarium shop and while it's a bit pricey, the customer service is top-notch, the guys happy to give me some pretty valuable advice on fishkeeping, c02 systems, plants etc.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: tylerthegloob on July 11, 2019, 03:29:39 pm
for me it's been playing bass, snowboarding, and doing any kind of martial arts

i COULD buy a bass or go snowboarding or go to the nearest muay that gym or w.e, but... idk for various reasons i just haven't. i bought a (six string) guitar and i've been going to the gym and that's been sufficient... but i do miss those other hobbies
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: VanIslander on July 11, 2019, 11:28:54 pm
1. Perusing the library. I could get lost for hours dipping into a book or books i came across in a library, spending half a day easily there before signing anything out.

2. Diving. Outside the biggest metro areas, it's hard in Korea to find a deep pool, let alone one with a board. I took for granted back home the local YMCA.

3. Playing catch in the park. Mitt and ball, football or frisbee, it was easy back home to find someone EAGER to do it. Heck, one would fall into a pickup game of softball or ball hockey!

4. Hanging out in a sports bar and actually having others watch and cheer during the games. In my twenties it was easy to strike up conversations over sports in Windsor/Detroit, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Vancouver, Oakland, Alameda.

5. Playing chess. Back home there was often someone who plays well around. Here i have to settle for online - not the same fun experience. I recall a great Christmas Eve spent in Gatineau, Quebec at a French home, drinking French wine and playing the party host's older brother all night in the corner of the living room, at least four bottles between us.  Here, i have had old men and children play Korean/Asian chess, with elephant and cannon, but that's a pretty different thing.

6. Dancing. Gawd, back home we had sock hops in elementary school, dances in middle and high school and clubs to go to in uni. I may be getting older but i know back home my aunts still go dancing and there are various opportunities to do it socially.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Ronnie Omelettes on July 12, 2019, 07:55:50 am
Swimming in lakes.  Or snorkelling in the sea.  Not sure of the legality of swimming in the lakes here anyway, but wouldn't want to because they are always grim.  Most of the ones near me seem to be reservoirs as well, so I'm not sure you're even allowed to.  Snorkelling in the sea is also pretty pointless here because the sea is so murky.  Nothing to see there. 

Music.  Techno and DnB to be more precise.  Before I came to Korea, I would go out to listen to DJs playing and was in the know with it all.  Which also included vinyl and cd shopping, but I suppose that is more of a sign of the times that those are being phased out.  When I worked in Sheffield, my lunch-time would consist of buying a sandwich and heading up to the vinyl shop and listening to the white labels and if they were good, buy them for my older brother for our music nights in.  My older bro lives in Berlin now and the music scene there is ace.  Korea is a techno and DnB desert. 

Working on my car.  I bought a brand new car a few years ago here so there is no real need to work on it.  But I loved to be tinkering around with my old bangers ages ago.  It's also like decorating and general DIY.  I have an apartment now that was built last year so I can't touch it or alter it.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Chinguetti on July 12, 2019, 08:22:22 am
Martial arts. I know they have a lot of options for these here, but I haven't been able to find a place in my town that has classes specifically for adults during times that I can actually attend.

Swimming. Like, real swimming, none of that wading around and kicking at the waves crap. They don't have accessible pools in my area.

Bouldering.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Thomas Mc on July 12, 2019, 08:32:15 am
I think this should be more "what hobbies do you miss in RURAL Korea" because a lot of these things are readily available in big cities.

The same problems would be evident in a rural setting in your home country.

I done martial arts when I was in Korea and the clubs were not bad. Not excellent but not bad.

I also swam as well at a full size olympic swimming pool. It was an excellent swimming pool with competitive masters classes. I have never had a swimming experience like that since.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Mister Tim on July 12, 2019, 08:48:10 am
for me it's been playing bass, snowboarding, and doing any kind of martial arts

i COULD buy a bass or go snowboarding or go to the nearest muay that gym or w.e, but... idk for various reasons i just haven't. i bought a (six string) guitar and i've been going to the gym and that's been sufficient... but i do miss those other hobbies

I actually switched from guitar to bass after moving to Korea, because it's much easier to find bands as a bassist, haha. Everyone and their brother plays guitar.  If you REALLY want to up your chances of finding people to jam with, though, take up the drums.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: theman3285 on July 12, 2019, 11:09:57 am
Tennis:

I live in a small city where the foreigners aren't interested in tennis and the only way to play regularly would be to join a club. I tried a few places and found it to be filled with some of the most arrogant, cliquey, snobs
I've ever come across. They're also old farts and not interested in playing singles . What makes things worse is that the membership fee is about 300k a month! 300k a month to play on a crappy piece of astroturf. No thanks.
I had this problem in my previous (suuuuper rural) town, only one set of dirt courts. Luckily I was loitering around the courts one day and some dude rocked up for his afternoon knock. He approached me with perfect English and asked if I was interested in knocking with him on a regular basis. No brainer really.

Then I moved to a bigger town (small city) and got even luckier. Our sports center has a set of pristine cement courts that are open 24/7. EVEN LUCKIER is that I have a foreign mate here who's a keen tennis player. We've been playing about once a week for the last year or so. Good times. 

Anyone been watching wimbledon? Channel 135 on BTV. Semis tonight.

As for my other hobby (drone flying), Korea couldn't be better. Decent scenery, and restrictions are minimal. I haven't received a single complaint.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Mr.DeMartino on July 12, 2019, 01:03:06 pm
1) Almost non-existent general aviation.  I understand, given the whole quasi-state of war thing as well as rather difficult conditions, what with all the mountains and overcast skies.
2) Guns. Back home you could just pick up a couple boxes of ammo, go over to someone's house with a big backyard outside of the city and plink away.  Here you have to pay stupid money to go shoot.
3) Trail Riding. All the riding here is English and by people who either want to be jockeys or do dressage. Everyone here has a stick up their ass about it. Outside of Jeju, hard to find anywhere you can just ride a trail in relaxed comfort without paying a ton.
4) RVing. RVs are simply too big and clumsy for here. Sucks.
5) Yachting. Not like back home where you could just hop in your uncle's or friend's yacht and party on the lake.
6) Certain hobbies/nerddoms that are foreigner-heavy (which is fine, but it would be nice to have some locals in the mix too). Stuff like Star Trek cons, certain board games, etc.
7) As someone mentioned, fixing cars. Sucks you can't spend an afternoon doing some work while listening to some music or whatever.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Mr.DeMartino on July 12, 2019, 01:15:29 pm
5. Playing chess. Back home there was often someone who plays well around. Here i have to settle for online - not the same fun experience. I recall a great Christmas Eve spent in Gatineau, Quebec at a French home, drinking French wine and playing the party host's older brother all night in the corner of the living room, at least four bottles between us.  Here, i have had old men and children play Korean/Asian chess, with elephant and cannon, but that's a pretty different thing.
I think the scene in Seoul at least is getting a little better. I've seen some people in a few cafes playing serious chess (timed matches, keeping notation, post-match analysis, etc.) and I think there are a few clubs around.

Interestingly, a fair number of elementary-aged kids are somewhat into it. Most of them aren't great, but a couple are. It's fun if you play a kid who knows changqi well and see how they do, as they kind of understand some fundamentals and the patience required to select a move and how to calculate things, so they can definitely be more fun than the normal ones who are clueless.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: SPQR on July 12, 2019, 02:02:08 pm
I think this should be more "what hobbies do you miss in RURAL Korea" because a lot of these things are readily available in big cities.

Haha, no shit.  You won't be doing most of the things listed above living in some place
like Asswipe, Kansas either.

But some are legitimate:

1/ Shooting. Especially black powder. (But I understand why. A 30-06 would probably travel
clear across Korea before it stopped.

2/ Smoking dope.

3/ Boating.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: plan b on July 12, 2019, 02:33:15 pm
1. Watching live theater like small independent plays and musicals.

2. Taking classes at night and on the weekend. Not necessarily for ones career, but just interesting classes that would pertain to interests, or future plans.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: oglop on July 12, 2019, 04:21:04 pm
decent live music
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: CO2 on July 12, 2019, 04:29:19 pm
decent live music
Agreed. When I lived in Toronto I thought about how cool it would be to live in the UK and see all my favourite bands all the time and in different cities.

Now? TORONTO WAS ****.

(or "baps," if you will.)
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: oglop on July 12, 2019, 04:40:31 pm
yep. or even going down the local pub. always decent bands playing, whichever night of the week
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: NorthStar on July 12, 2019, 08:52:53 pm
1.  420
2.  Camping/fishing in the summer (just to miserable here to do that)
3.  Being able to walk into a normal pub/bar and NOT have to endure some STUPID K-drama on the TV.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: CO2 on July 12, 2019, 10:31:37 pm
3.  Being able to walk into a normal pub/bar and NOT have to endure some STUPID K-drama on the TV.
I don't get this. I don't even like sports, but I get it. You look up every once in a while and check the score. OR if it's a really important game, 80% of the people are watching the game.

But a Kdrama? Is anyone really watching season 3 episode 6 of "The Kim's Family struggles in an overlit 45pyeong apt?"

No. And the volume is usually not on anyway.

SO WHAT'S THE POINT?
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: VanIslander on July 12, 2019, 10:38:22 pm
5. Playing chess. Back home there was often someone who plays well around. Here i have to settle for online - not the same fun experience. I recall a great Christmas Eve spent in Gatineau, Quebec at a French home, drinking French wine and playing the party host's older brother all night in the corner of the living room, at least four bottles between us.  Here, i have had old men and children play Korean/Asian chess, with elephant and cannon, but that's a pretty different thing.
I think the scene in Seoul at least is getting a little better. I've seen some people in a few cafes playing serious chess (timed matches, keeping notation, post-match analysis, etc.) ...
On Jeju the foreigners (and one local twentysomething who had gone overseas) had a chess club meeting at Gecho's in Jungmun i think it was 2010 or 2011 and i joined them and beat their champ in 15 minutes. He wanted a re-match and ALL other six players wanted to help him ( i was up a rook and two pawns in the 2nd game) and asked me if that was ok and i, aghast and disappointed at their fandom and lack of support of the new guy, said okay, ended up losing my lead and 7 vs. 1 conceded, smiled, left, and never returned.

I mean, i haven't in my many years here came across chess that was QUALITY and FUN, relaxed, let's just have a good game without geek clocks or stress of titles, just some happening gameplay and rapport.

I had a better experience playing the ragged park dwelling supposed homeless of San Francisco back in the 90's than i ever have in my years in South Korea.

Anyways...

The baduk i've learned from old guys here has been fun, though i never win at that game. Even 6 chess championships doesn't prepare you so well for the game of Go.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Aristocrat on July 13, 2019, 10:14:10 am
5. Playing chess. Back home there was often someone who plays well around. Here i have to settle for online - not the same fun experience. I recall a great Christmas Eve spent in Gatineau, Quebec at a French home, drinking French wine and playing the party host's older brother all night in the corner of the living room, at least four bottles between us.  Here, i have had old men and children play Korean/Asian chess, with elephant and cannon, but that's a pretty different thing.
I think the scene in Seoul at least is getting a little better. I've seen some people in a few cafes playing serious chess (timed matches, keeping notation, post-match analysis, etc.) ...
On Jeju the foreigners (and one local twentysomething who had gone overseas) had a chess club meeting at Gecho's in Jungmun i think it was 2010 or 2011 and i joined them and beat their champ in 15 minutes. He wanted a re-match and ALL other six players wanted to help him ( i was up a rook and two pawns in the 2nd game) and asked me if that was ok and i, aghast and disappointed at their fandom and lack of support of the new guy, said okay, ended up losing my lead and 7 vs. 1 conceded, smiled, left, and never returned.

I mean, i haven't in my many years here came across chess that was QUALITY and FUN, relaxed, let's just have a good game without geek clocks or stress of titles, just some happening gameplay and rapport.

I had a better experience playing the ragged park dwelling supposed homeless of San Francisco back in the 90's than i ever have in my years in South Korea.

Anyways...

The baduk i've learned from old guys here has been fun, though i never win at that game. Even 6 chess championships doesn't prepare you so well for the game of Go.

That's a common thing I've noticed, take a fun hobby that should otherwise be chilled, social and laid-back and turn it into a serious, rigid and competitive stress pot. Don't get me wrong, I love competition and always pursue to improve my skills, but at some point you've just got to take it easy, by gracious in defeat and humble in victory.

My first year in Korea, I tried entering a few surf contests, just for the fun of it and to get myself involved. I cancelled my plans when I learned that the organizers were putting foreigners and Koreans in separate divisions (never heard of a surf contest separated by nationality)... meaning I'd be surfing against, at most, one other guy, when there were at least a dozen Korean guys entering the contest. Apparently, somebody complained that it was unfair to put foreigners and Koreans in the same division because we, potentially, had more practice in our home countries and are more experienced... Yeah, well, most of the Korean surfers live 5min from the beach and surf everyday, I'm lucky to get 5 sessions a year. Is winning really that important to them?



Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: L I on July 13, 2019, 10:25:46 am
Even 6 chess championships doesn't prepare you so well for the game of Go.

You're a six time chess champion? Where at?
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: oglop on July 13, 2019, 10:47:40 am
in an overlit 45pyeong apt?"

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Mr.DeMartino on July 13, 2019, 11:19:11 am
3.  Being able to walk into a normal pub/bar and NOT have to endure some STUPID K-drama on the TV.
Darn those Koreans for.....watching KoreanTV!

Just because the program is insignificant and uninteresting to you, does not make it insignificant and uninteresting to everyone else.

Anyways, now you know how people who don't care for sports feel.

But a Kdrama? Is anyone really watching season 3 episode 6 of "The Kim's Family struggles in an overlit 45pyeong apt?"

No. And the volume is usually not on anyway.

SO WHAT'S THE POINT?
Would anyone bat an eye if say, 'Breaking Bad' was on in the background or 'Game of Thrones' or 'Seinfeld' or whatever? It wouldn't bother anyone. Might even get people talking.

What looks to us like a bunch of people in some apartment can look to them like something else entirely because they understand its context and import.

I don't watch much KoreanTV, in fact pretty much the only Korean drama I've watched is 'Misaeng', but if Misaeng was on in the background, I wouldn't call it stupid (it was a pretty darn good show), and while it might just look like a bunch of people talking in an office, I would know pretty quickly which episode it was, the story, and it might get a conversation going.

Even 6 chess championships doesn't prepare you so well for the game of Go.
[/quote]
Ain't that the truth. I am okay at chess, but I am useless at Go.

I remember on Dave's (and I think on here as well) someone tried to knock it as some dumb game "just putting stones on a board" and I think someone else said it was just Othello. Never mind that when chess grandmasters in the early 20th century were first exposed to the game, they instantly recognized its significance and deep strategy. Smart people can usually recognize smart. Dumb people often have trouble with that.

When I first was exposed to Go, I called it stupid and indicative of the poor East Asian grasp of tactics and lack of focus on the schwerpunkt. Shows what kind of person I am.

It was over this that one of my good friends said a quote I have often used: "Just because YOU don't understand something, doesn't mean it's stupid."
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Aristocrat on July 13, 2019, 01:09:51 pm
in an overlit 45pyeong apt?"

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'm guessing it makes the actors' and actresses' skin appear more vibrant and fairer.
Korea is still pretty nouveau riche and anything dimmer than floodlights probably doesn't make things seem new and modern.

The thing I find hilarious are the clothes and decor. The actors and actresses look more like they're wearing costumes than clothes; sometimes emphasis should be placed on making the show look authentic and in 2019, even rich people aren't going to walk around in a 3-piece suit, windsor knot and impeccably styled hair 24-7.
Looking at the decor, you're likely going to see the inside of the apartments decorated with Napoleon busts, fake Monet paintings and other manner of cliched, 1980's rich people paraphernalia.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: VanIslander on July 13, 2019, 01:16:39 pm
Even 6 chess championships doesn't prepare you so well for the game of Go.

You're a six time chess champion? Where at?
My elementary school (Grade 4 vs. all grades)
My city Grade 4 elementary.
My province Grade 4. (Went to the nationals and had my *** handed to me: 2 draws, 2 losses, officially ranked 11th in Canada in my age group but was the second worst player in the room that day.

My middle school/high school (it was Grades 8 to 12 and no one ever beat me over the 5 years, though one teacher got a couple of draws out of me).

My city Grade 10 (I didn't go to provincials cuz i chose to spend that time with my girlfriend).

My university. I defeated the reigning champ in 15 minutes.

That all said, i have always found it hard to beat my dad, who taught me the game (he once beat a ranked champion at a chess club in Vancouver and they wanted/kept urging him to play with a clock (he never did), in tourneys,  so he stopped going there.

And the Internet chess sites are FULL of guys who beat me regularly.

So, given my dad, plus that day i was so much less than the others in the room at the Grade 4 nationals, plus the Internet... i am pretty humble about myself.

I have lost to great players in long casual fun games in BC, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and California. I have fond memories of games in the park or at homes late at night as i mentioned.

But i have been living in SK for a long time and away from Seoul or Busan, where i am sure chess clubs probably are fun and at a high level.

I got joy out of teaching students on Jeju when i taught my hagwon high level class five days a week (40 minutes each day they had with me, 49 minutes each day with a korean teacher - an elite academy that sent students to international schools on jeju and over my 7 years there some of the students i taught chess to went to american unis afterwards (u of kentucky, ivy league upenn).

I am now in a town of about 50,000 in Gyeongsangnamdo and teach each class only once a week, so i don't have the time to teach them chess (though i taught two who came early, before my first class of the day, and i had to increase my prep time then to accommodate their eagerness).

Note: if anyone here would like to spend 6-8 hours leisurely playing chess one day or evening (no rush, food, drink, discussion, challenging play), then a park or beach or other chillin' site i'd gladly meet up at some weekend. (I keep a chess set in my korando just in case...)
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: belo horizonte on July 14, 2019, 04:19:03 pm

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'd say the lighting reflects the typical Korean apartment. Every Korean apartment I'd lived in has had those big square ceiling lights pumping out the kind of light you'd see in a hospital surgery. Absolutely horrible if you want to try and relax  after a stressful day at work.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: oglop on July 14, 2019, 04:31:58 pm

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'd say the lighting reflects the typical Korean apartment. Every Korean apartment I'd lived in has had those big square ceiling lights pumping out the kind of light you'd see in a hospital surgery. Absolutely horrible if you want to try and relax  after a stressful day at work.
This is a good point. My MIL doesnt even have a lamp shade - just a bare bulb - and turns it on all of the time. Brighter than the sun. My wife insists on turning the main light on first thing in the mornings too. Infuriating
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Ronnie Omelettes on July 15, 2019, 07:26:37 am

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'd say the lighting reflects the typical Korean apartment. Every Korean apartment I'd lived in has had those big square ceiling lights pumping out the kind of light you'd see in a hospital surgery. Absolutely horrible if you want to try and relax  after a stressful day at work.
This is a good point. My MIL doesnt even have a lamp shade - just a bare bulb - and turns it on all of the time. Brighter than the sun. My wife insists on turning the main light on first thing in the mornings too. Infuriating

I don't think I've turned on the main lights in my current apartment, or the previous one.  Not sure I want snow blindness.  Horrible horrible things.  I don't even have the lights on full in my classroom, and my students are fine with that too.  Having the lights on full when eating was explained by a Korean friend, that they like to see what they're eating.   :undecided:
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: oglop on July 15, 2019, 08:28:34 am
I've heard that too, but the main lights are SO bright here. It's like turning on floodlights. I should probably just change the bulb..
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Mister Tim on July 15, 2019, 08:32:53 am

i'm glad i'm not the only one who notices this. kdramas are always so bright. but why? i've tried googling some explanations but nothing comes up. it looks ridiculous

I'd say the lighting reflects the typical Korean apartment. Every Korean apartment I'd lived in has had those big square ceiling lights pumping out the kind of light you'd see in a hospital surgery. Absolutely horrible if you want to try and relax  after a stressful day at work.
This is a good point. My MIL doesnt even have a lamp shade - just a bare bulb - and turns it on all of the time. Brighter than the sun. My wife insists on turning the main light on first thing in the mornings too. Infuriating

I don't think I've turned on the main lights in my current apartment, or the previous one.  Not sure I want snow blindness.  Horrible horrible things.  I don't even have the lights on full in my classroom, and my students are fine with that too.  Having the lights on full when eating was explained by a Korean friend, that they like to see what they're eating.   :undecided:

Maybe the bright lights are for those same vision impaired people who need the in-apartment loudspeaker announcements.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: NorthStar on July 15, 2019, 08:33:12 am
Quote
Darn those Koreans for.....watching KoreanTV!

Just because the program is insignificant and uninteresting to you, does not make it insignificant and uninteresting to everyone else.

Korean baseball is Korean T.V.

As a customer, it would be nice to request they staff change the channel (in a pub/bar) over to the Doosan game, as opposed to suffering through mentally derelict K-dramas or shopping networks...without them huffing and puffing (especially when there are only a few other folks there, NOT watching that crap, probably thinking the same thing) because they have to get up out of their squat, find the remote and make a change for paying customer who has an interest in a credible cultural activity. 

And, what is it to you?  Why should it matter to you?  ...a paying customer goes into a proper pub/bar that would more than likely have more customers if the staff were not squatting around, watching crap? 

This should be interesting...fire away, Doc.

Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: 303lmc on July 15, 2019, 08:38:22 am
regarding lighting...my apartment when I moved here was a disaster, broken light fixtures etc... so when I told the school they came put in the BRIGHTEST lighting ever. I told them it was too bright for me so they gave me some hanji to put over it. I have literally like 5 layers of hanji over each new excruciatingly bright light fixture. They even disabled the new one they installed  over the door that drove me NUTS because it was so sensitive it went on and off all day and night. I had several layers and even a black plastic bag over it. (They've had to come by several times to my place so far, broken window, new fridge ...)  I also bought the IKEA paper lamp for 10000W because I prefer soft lighting over 900+ lumens that sears my corneas and gives me an outright migraine. in the classroom I only turn on half the lights. but sometimes the kids will turn them all on and I can usually adjust, but once they are even halfway out the door all the lights go off!  but it's still not as annoyingly bright to me like the LED lights going in EVERYWHERE  in the states. I'm not sure why either.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: 303lmc on July 15, 2019, 08:40:11 am
regarding lighting...my apartment when I moved here was a disaster, broken light fixtures etc... so when I told the school they came put in the BRIGHTEST lighting ever. I told them it was too bright for me so they gave me some hanji to put over it. I have literally like 5 layers of hanji over each new excruciatingly bright light fixture. They even disabled the new one they installed  over the door that drove me NUTS because it was so sensitive it went on and off all day and night. I had several layers and even a black plastic bag over it. (They've had to come by several times to my place so far, broken window, new fridge ...)  I also bought the IKEA paper lamp for 10000W because I prefer soft lighting over 900+ lumens that sears my corneas and gives me an outright migraine. in the classroom I only turn on half the lights. but sometimes the kids will turn them all on and I can usually adjust, but once they are even halfway out the door all the lights go off!  but it's still not as annoyingly bright to me like the LED lights going in EVERYWHERE  in the states. I'm not sure why either.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: lhelena on July 15, 2019, 08:43:22 am
Living in a shoebox in a rural area I mostly miss cooking things I actually enjoy. I love cooking new things and experimenting with food, but since living here I've kind of just stopped. I've been so discouraged by mostly my kitchen situation but also grocery shopping here as a foreigner. My apartment kitchen has a sliver of counter space and a 2-burner gas range that was installed by a crackhead because it butts up to my back-splash.  So having more than one pot/pan on there at a time means the one in back is pressed against the laminate back-splash and half hanging off the burner. Not to mention the horrors of small town grocery shopping. If you go to small local marts out where I live you'll end up buying produce that's either already rotted or will be when you take it out to use it the next day. My friend just bought a bag of apples the other day and when she opened them they were all stuck together by rot. Going to Emart or Lottemart are the only good options and they're a bus/car ride away. And then not having an oven makes me want to cry every time I find a new recipe.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: leaponover on July 15, 2019, 11:02:21 am
Used to have a pretty decent poker league in town.  Free to play, and you got points for winning which qualified you for events where you could actually win money.  Also had a big organized event every year at a casino about an hour away.  I miss it, but was something I'd only do single anyway.  Not sure I'd take advantage of it now if they had it here.

I also miss a real bowling league.  The bowling clubs here are kind of lame.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: NorthStar on July 15, 2019, 02:32:45 pm
Quote
The bowling clubs here are kind of lame.


I feel ya...

Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Aristocrat on July 16, 2019, 11:57:21 am

3. Playing catch in the park. Mitt and ball, football or frisbee, it was easy back home to find someone EAGER to do it. Heck, one would fall into a pickup game of softball or ball hockey!


^This

I live in a more rural city and while there are parks, pretty much every one of them eventually becomes a walking trail, with cheesy ornaments all over the place. Don't get me wrong, many of the walking trails are lovely, but can at least ONE space be left as a bit of public grass a few friends to get together for a game of cricket, catch, frisbee, touch rugby or whatever?

Korea, recreation can be more exciting than walking slowly and taking selfies.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: Mr.DeMartino on July 16, 2019, 12:38:00 pm
Korean baseball is Korean T.V.

As a customer, it would be nice to request they staff change the channel (in a pub/bar) over to the Doosan game, as opposed to suffering through mentally derelict K-dramas or shopping networks...without them huffing and puffing (especially when there are only a few other folks there, NOT watching that crap, probably thinking the same thing) because they have to get up out of their squat, find the remote and make a change for paying customer who has an interest in a credible cultural activity. 

And, what is it to you?  Why should it matter to you?  ...a paying customer goes into a proper pub/bar that would more than likely have more customers if the staff were not squatting around, watching crap? 
Well many do have baseball on. Also, many will happily change. Not too many get in a huff. The only reason I could imagine them doing so is if you're in Busan and want to put on a Kia game or something (or vice-versa). Either that or if some REALLY big drama was going on.

As far as the dramas not being worthy, that really is a matter of opinion. Now, I'm all for putting the ballgame on. But I also understand that if someone else wants to watch a drama, there has to be some sort of fair and equitable system where their opinion is respected. The way we see those "mentally derelict dramas" is the same way many people look  at sports. I mean, in the end, we are watching 9 guys stand around waiting for someone to hit a ball with a stick. Now to us there is so much more than that, but the same thing goes for two people in an apartment talking about a relationship. Just because I don't understand it or am not interested in it, doesn't make it stupid.

Also, what bar people go into, especially in Korea, has very little to do with effort by the staff. They could be mopping everything repeatedly or passing out fliers or trying out new recipes and it still would likely not matter. After a certain period, you really are at a point of diminishing returns for stuff you can do to draw in new business.

In Korea at least, I'd say a good 50% is down to location and concept. Another 40% goes down to advertising/media/awareness, which essentially amounts to someone famous/influencer mentioning your place.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: 303lmc on July 16, 2019, 01:43:45 pm
Living in a shoebox in a rural area I mostly miss cooking things I actually enjoy. I love cooking new things and experimenting with food, but since living here I've kind of just stopped. I've been so discouraged by mostly my kitchen situation but also grocery shopping here as a foreigner. My apartment kitchen has a sliver of counter space and a 2-burner gas range that was installed by a crackhead because it butts up to my back-splash.  So having more than one pot/pan on there at a time means the one in back is pressed against the laminate back-splash and half hanging off the burner. Not to mention the horrors of small town grocery shopping. If you go to small local marts out where I live you'll end up buying produce that's either already rotted or will be when you take it out to use it the next day. My friend just bought a bag of apples the other day and when she opened them they were all stuck together by rot. Going to Emart or Lottemart are the only good options and they're a bus/car ride away. And then not having an oven makes me want to cry every time I find a new recipe.
all of this! I used to cook and love it but now I rarely do. I did find coconut milk, green curry and fish sauce but getting not rotten produce is hard. I actually have a nice refrigerator now so i can fill it with food. i found a few really good places for food so I order a few things at once and heat them up as needed.
I'm about to find out where the E mart is so i can get some good produce hopefully
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: VanIslander on July 16, 2019, 02:02:03 pm
I do miss an oven.
I also miss lakes.

But i know i'll just appreciate them so much more when i eventually return to my home country.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: VanIslander on July 16, 2019, 02:02:20 pm
Hobbies i appreciate here:

1. People watching (waay more interesting in a different culture);

2. Walking along the shore (back home i never lived by the sea or rivershore - here i have done so for a long time);

3. FREE TIME! Just having so much time to do things makes me feel like a kid again; tons of time to do little things, to wander, to be idle, etc.
Title: Re: Hobbies you miss/can't do while in Korea
Post by: lhelena on July 16, 2019, 03:51:47 pm
Living in a shoebox in a rural area I mostly miss cooking things I actually enjoy. I love cooking new things and experimenting with food, but since living here I've kind of just stopped. I've been so discouraged by mostly my kitchen situation but also grocery shopping here as a foreigner. My apartment kitchen has a sliver of counter space and a 2-burner gas range that was installed by a crackhead because it butts up to my back-splash.  So having more than one pot/pan on there at a time means the one in back is pressed against the laminate back-splash and half hanging off the burner. Not to mention the horrors of small town grocery shopping. If you go to small local marts out where I live you'll end up buying produce that's either already rotted or will be when you take it out to use it the next day. My friend just bought a bag of apples the other day and when she opened them they were all stuck together by rot. Going to Emart or Lottemart are the only good options and they're a bus/car ride away. And then not having an oven makes me want to cry every time I find a new recipe.
all of this! I used to cook and love it but now I rarely do. I did find coconut milk, green curry and fish sauce but getting not rotten produce is hard. I actually have a nice refrigerator now so i can fill it with food. i found a few really good places for food so I order a few things at once and heat them up as needed.
I'm about to find out where the E mart is so i can get some good produce hopefully

Usually Emart is pretty great. Just be aware of the pricing on fruits. Don't buy fresh avocado, instead get the bag of frozen halves as they will  be better quality and a better deal. Also beware salad mixes in bags or those plastic containers. Those usually are already brown on the bottom or turn very quickly. If I'm wanting a salad for lunch or dinner I'll just go buy one that day that's already been made at Paris Baguette or the prepared grab-n-go area of the supermarket.