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Teaching => Lesson Plans, Ideas, & References => Middle-School => Topic started by: michaelpaul1988 on May 04, 2011, 09:09:32 am

Title: English vs American
Post by: michaelpaul1988 on May 04, 2011, 09:09:32 am
SImple powerpoint for teaching the kids english vs american vocab.

As a final exercise, make an alphabet code...you know A=3 B=4 etc etc and then put the american words on a worksheet in their code. Kids go through that and then put the english alongside. easy
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: SBracken on May 04, 2011, 09:37:48 am
Maybe it's just this computer but the powerpoint doesn't seem to work as it might be intended.... are there supposed to be random red bars on the second slide? What's their purpose? Are the slides supposed to so both the american term and the british term?
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: tardigrade on May 04, 2011, 09:42:39 am
Not looked at this yet, but I hope you explain American is not a language but English is......and American's speak it!!
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: kps1 on May 04, 2011, 11:37:29 am
I haven't looked at this yet, but I'm pretty sure America wins.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: Loudine on August 29, 2011, 11:04:47 am
@MichaelPaul - I really like your idea about the alphabet code!  I will use this in other lessons as well.  Thank you!
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: Koreachess on August 31, 2011, 10:32:06 am
Good powerpoint, But I am not sure about all the differences in the words. I am from America, so i know all the uses we American's use, but what about the English/British use of the words? Can anyone give me a heads up or a website?
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: Koreachess on September 08, 2011, 08:09:03 am
Here are some sites that give you slang and words that differ between the two countries.

Slang:
http://www.effingpot.com/slang.shtml

Objects (nouns):
http://www.effingpot.com/objects.shtml

Also, I added stuff to the powerpoint that offered the British terms as well as the American terms...
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: Seoulman79 on September 08, 2011, 12:21:47 pm
Good work on adding the Br meanings.  However, there are a few which I am unsure about.  This could depend alot on where abouts you come from in the UK, but the ones listed below, I'm sure are used all over the UK.

(Am) - (Br)

Check - Bill.  (pretty sure it comes from the French meaning 'Billet')

Aluminum - Tin foil

The movies - The cinema (The pictures is also used but nowadays not as frequent as The cinema)

Sick - Ill (I have heard of honking/hurling but I'm pretty certain they are slang....the same as 'throw/spew up'.


Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: Koreachess on September 08, 2011, 06:34:12 pm
Good work on adding the Br meanings.  However, there are a few which I am unsure about.  This could depend alot on where abouts you come from in the UK, but the ones listed below, I'm sure are used all over the UK.

(Am) - (Br)

Check - Bill.  (pretty sure it comes from the French meaning 'Billet')

Aluminum - Tin foil

The movies - The cinema (The pictures is also used but nowadays not as frequent as The cinema)

Sick - Ill (I have heard of honking/hurling but I'm pretty certain they are slang....the same as 'throw/spew up'.

You may be right on all those... i only put what I could find and what I knew. I googled the rest. So if there are any mistakes than I apologize  :P Still workign on learning English/British slang...
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: SBracken on September 09, 2011, 07:32:45 am
Good work on adding the Br meanings.  However, there are a few which I am unsure about.  This could depend alot on where abouts you come from in the UK, but the ones listed below, I'm sure are used all over the UK.

(Am) - (Br)

Check - Bill.  (pretty sure it comes from the French meaning 'Billet')

Aluminum - Tin foil

The movies - The cinema (The pictures is also used but nowadays not as frequent as The cinema)

Sick - Ill (I have heard of honking/hurling but I'm pretty certain they are slang....the same as 'throw/spew up'.

Do americans not say 'tin foil'? I know 'aluminum' is pronounced differently, but I thought everyone used 'tin foil'... Also 'ill', I thought that was same-same as well. :/
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: daforshner on September 09, 2011, 08:47:45 am
Great idea about the alphabet code! I won't be using this lesson, but I will for sure be using the code in other lesson plans.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: dapto1 on September 09, 2011, 08:56:31 am
This list is from an activity book I have:

British - American

Autumn - Fall
Car park - Parking lot
Chips - French Fries
Dustbin - garbage can/ trashcan
Flat - apartment
Handbag - purse
Lift - elevator
Pavement - sidewalk
Sweets - candy
Tin - can
Bill - check
Chemist - drugstore
Curtains - drapes
Film - movie
Garden - yard
Holiday - vacation
Lorry - truck
Petrol - gas
Taxi - cab
Trousers - pants
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: WorkingTitle3484 on September 09, 2011, 09:18:34 am
This list is from an activity book I have:

British - American

Autumn - Fall
Car park - Parking lot
Chips - French Fries
Dustbin - garbage can/ trashcan
Flat - apartment
Handbag - purse
Lift - elevator
Pavement - sidewalk
Sweets - candy
Tin - can
Bill - check
Chemist - drugstore
Curtains - drapes
Film - movie
Garden - yard
Holiday - vacation
Lorry - truck
Petrol - gas
Taxi - cab
Trousers - pants


Not to sound nitpicky, and I do appreciate you putting up the list and I'm not singling just Dapto out, but in the Northeast region of the States, we say the bold terms interchangeably (not sure if this is a word, lacking my English is).

IMO, the rest of the words are on target.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: flasyb on September 09, 2011, 09:45:58 am
This list is from an activity book I have:

British - American

Autumn - Fall
Car park - Parking lot
Chips - French Fries
Dustbin - garbage can/ trashcan
Flat - apartment
Handbag - purse
Lift - elevator
Pavement - sidewalk
Sweets - candy
Tin - can
Bill - check
Chemist - drugstore
Curtains - drapes
Film - movie
Garden - yard
Holiday - vacation
Lorry - truck
Petrol - gas
Taxi - cab
Trousers - pants

I think that's a good list. Only thing I can see is you spelled "check" wrong. "Cheque" that you get from the bank or in a restaurant and "check" as in "Check that girl out!"

Also, being British, I would say a can of coke but a tin of baked beans.

One other thing worth mentioning would be "Rubbish - Garbage/Trash"
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: dapto1 on September 09, 2011, 10:01:30 am
I think that's a good list. Only thing I can see is you spelled "check" wrong. "Cheque" that you get from the bank or in a restaurant and "check" as in "Check that girl out!"

Also, being British, I would say a can of coke but a tin of baked beans.

One other thing worth mentioning would be "Rubbish - Garbage/Trash"
Cheers, but I can't take the credit as it's from an activity book (Vocabulary Games and Activities by Watcyn-Jones). Also, I think "check" is the American English spelling. At least it was in the book, and also according to wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheque

Workingtitle, similarly many of the American English words are used in the UK and Ireland as well. The divide between the two isn't black and white, and absolutely there are regional differences. Personally I think at this level it's easier to generalise, at least with my students!
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: flasyb on September 09, 2011, 10:26:15 am
I think that's a good list. Only thing I can see is you spelled "check" wrong. "Cheque" that you get from the bank or in a restaurant and "check" as in "Check that girl out!"

Also, being British, I would say a can of coke but a tin of baked beans.

One other thing worth mentioning would be "Rubbish - Garbage/Trash"
Cheers, but I can't take the credit as it's from an activity book (Vocabulary Games and Activities by Watcyn-Jones). Also, I think "check" is the American English spelling. At least it was in the book, and also according to wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheque

Workingtitle, similarly many of the American English words are used in the UK and Ireland as well. The divide between the two isn't black and white, and absolutely there are regional differences. Personally I think at this level it's easier to generalise, at least with my students!

Ahh very true. I'd teach them both spellings in case they ever encounter "cheque."
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: SpaceRook on September 09, 2011, 11:24:37 am
I think the intentions behind this lesson are good, but it's really going to just frustrate and confuse the kids.  Unless they are very advanced students, I don't think time should be spent discussing different dialects.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: SBracken on September 09, 2011, 01:24:20 pm
I think the intentions behind this lesson are good, but it's really going to just frustrate and confuse the kids.  Unless they are very advanced students, I don't think time should be spent discussing different dialects.

I think it more depends on their mental capacity than their English level. They understand that Korean has regional differences, and my middle schoolers applied the logic just fine. I tell them that American English and British English are different, and if an example comes up I'll show it (color/colour, trash/rubbish). They were pretty open-minded about it (and not confused, at least not that I noticed).
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: minamteacher on September 09, 2011, 02:46:18 pm
Hello, I updated this lesson to include spelling differences. Also, I found a great handout from Lynn Westmore on http://www.ielanguages.com/lessonplan.html called British vs. American English which I intend to use in class. A few of the questions from the handout are not addressed in my ppt., so I will write them on the board and discuss. This lesson uses the same template as michaelpaul1988.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: minamteacher on September 09, 2011, 02:57:40 pm
I think the intentions behind this lesson are good, but it's really going to just frustrate and confuse the kids.  Unless they are very advanced students, I don't think time should be spent discussing different dialects.

I think it more depends on their mental capacity than their English level. They understand that Korean has regional differences, and my middle schoolers applied the logic just fine. I tell them that American English and British English are different, and if an example comes up I'll show it (color/colour, trash/rubbish). They were pretty open-minded about it (and not confused, at least not that I noticed).

That's a good point SBracken. I will try to use that context 'regional differences of Korea' to help explain. I think some import words to use are "사투리 satuli" - Accent and "방언 bang-eon" - Dialect. Also, if you see here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeju_dialect the Jeju dialect has many differences from the Seoul dialect. This could be a great thing to highlight. For example an umbrella is 우산 in Seoul and 가사 in Jeju.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: tfung31 on September 09, 2011, 03:00:59 pm
This lesson really should be called British vs American. English vs American implies that Americans don't speak English.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: calliesaur on September 14, 2011, 10:46:06 am
I can't seem to open the PPT... I think I might have an older version of PPT. Any chance you could try posting it as a different version?  THANKS!!!   :D
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: Alhayes on October 03, 2011, 08:43:36 pm
Have been looking for something like this, thankyou!  :D
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: cassius85 on October 04, 2011, 12:00:21 pm
great lesson..
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: minamteacher on October 05, 2011, 07:39:35 am
I can't seem to open the PPT... I think I might have an older version of PPT. Any chance you could try posting it as a different version?  THANKS!!!   :D

Try downloading the compatibility pack here http://waygook.org/index.php/topic,21281.0.html
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: ryanklls on November 03, 2011, 02:46:32 pm
Ah, thanks a load for this. Gave a lesson like this ages ago and was looking for something extra to add to it! Will use it for my grade 2 class
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: jamespstyles on November 03, 2011, 02:50:05 pm
This lesson really should be called British vs American. English vs American implies that Americans don't speak English.

No I think the title English vs American title is perfect in its implication.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: windywillow20 on November 03, 2011, 11:32:06 pm
This is great. My students are slighty confused by some of the words.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: matthews_world on November 04, 2011, 01:14:23 pm
Hoover - Vacuum.

I always mistake this one.  Hoover is an American vacuum cleaner company.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: Theodoros on November 04, 2011, 03:22:42 pm
What about differences in verbal spellings such as the British "practise" v the American "practice", "spelt" v spelt or "realise" v "realize". 
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: Chicagohotdog on April 12, 2012, 07:37:36 am
I haven't got through the whole thing, but just glancing at the original ppt, I noticed one thing.  Where I come from (Chicago) expressway does mean highway, but it more typically refers to an interstate than a highway.  And that tends to be a midwestern term more than a universally American term. 

Thinking of that though - now I want to do a lesson on midwestern-isms...Chicago has quite a few (Pop...fronchroom... yeah, we have a few...) 
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: petere on April 12, 2012, 05:04:39 pm
Words pronounced the same are not spelt the same, e.g. Colour and color.

A lot of slang is introduced into language now which makes matters worse in understanding some conversations, but with far more Eastern countries being westernised, and a lot of what they pick up and see is from American movies. As a consequence of more Eastern population integration, europe is slowly being Americanised as well.

Who dressed up on Halloween 20 years ago knocking on doors to get sweets. It's a big thing in Britain now, something Americans have done for many decades.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: kajee.alia@gmail.com on April 12, 2012, 06:47:13 pm
I'm from South Africa and use British English. It really helps the kids understand different accents of English when the textbook listening activities are in American English and I speak with another accent. They were confused at first but now realise there are other types of English!
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: wongv on April 13, 2012, 07:57:48 am
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: kps1 on April 13, 2012, 02:37:22 pm
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.

That's because they hire more Americans. The majority of the time they find it easier to understand our monotone accents. Also, as an American I think saying "zee" instead of "zed" makes more sense. To me that'd be as weird as saying," oh thats not bee that's bed."
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: SpaceRook on April 14, 2012, 02:51:31 pm
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.

That's because America invented English.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: mccall on April 15, 2012, 09:15:43 pm
great subject matter, thanks for all the posts. As an extra to all this, you might also mention that in Canada, just north of the border, we use British spelling and  different slang than Americans. Just food for thought.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: dhko2809 on April 19, 2012, 09:54:40 am
Needed a lesson like this to show the differences~ There is more to English than just American English  ;D
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: dapto1 on April 19, 2012, 01:11:01 pm
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.

Isn't American English what is on the state exams here? I heard from a co-teacher that students are marked wrong if they use the British English version. If this is the case, people should be careful about ONLY teaching British English.
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: tfung31 on April 20, 2012, 08:43:43 am
My very first lesson, i had the students to the alphabet.. I said, "in america they say zee, in england they say zed. in america they say zee, in canada they say zed. In america they say zee, in new zealand they say zed".. and so forth. Its amazing how in korea american english seems to be considered more correct.

Isn't American English what is on the state exams here? I heard from a co-teacher that students are marked wrong if they use the British English version. If this is the case, people should be careful about ONLY teaching British English.

Good point! American style high five! (it's a high five with an American flag in the other hand)
Title: Re: English vs American
Post by: Bester on April 20, 2012, 02:27:59 pm
I love this thanks so much. This will help to shed some light on a lot of things in my school