May 24, 2018, 04:11:08 AM

Author Topic: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0  (Read 925203 times)

Offline DMZabductee

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 797
  • Gender: Male
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #680 on: September 01, 2016, 12:44:07 PM »
The two biggest things that put me off continuing to study Korean:

I can't remember who it was but someone on this site made a great point about speaking English to a Korean person; you have to constantly "ride the brake".  I can't understand why Koreans don't do it for us.

Anytime someone hears anything beyond annyonghaseyo they assume you've mastered the entire language and then carry on at light speed. Ughh. I hate it but I've just had to come to the conclusion that it's nobody's job here to be my language partner (outside of my actual language partner ha) so they're not gonna cut me any slack. I know we do it for them but that's kinda our job as teachers, plus we are in their country so  :undecided:

On a positive note though I've finally trained a couple co-workers to speak at a reasonable pace when we speak Korean! It's amazing. They picked up on the fact that I was seriously grading my English when speaking with them and now they return the favor! Hallelujah! Only took 2 years but I'll take it  :laugh:


Offline welcomebackkotter

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 670
  • Gender: Male
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #681 on: September 01, 2016, 12:49:14 PM »

It reminds me of the time, early in my stint here, when I went to order a coffee.  Young kid behind the counter, and sure, my pronunciation could not have been perfect, but I was trying....
Me: Coppi joo-say-oh. 
Him: Korean Stare.
Me: cop-pee joo-sah-yoh?
Him: Korean Stare plus tilt of head.
Me: Koppee jew-say-yo?
Him: Korean Stare into space now.
And this continues for at least three more exchanges before it clicks: Ah, koppee! Neh.
I standing in a god-damm coffee shop!!! A coffee shop you work in!! What did you think I was asking for? The crown jewels? Your mother? What?????!!!!

Obviously my fault for imprecise pronunciation.  No lateral thinking or putting pieces together for that boy. 

 

Did you... look at the menu and see if there was an item called 'coffee'?

Imagine walking into Starbucks in Canada or something, and just saying, "Coffee please." They'd probably also wait for you to specify what kind of coffee you want, or be confused.

And then imagine, instead of clarifying, saying to the English speaking cashier or barista, "Cawfee plase. Cuffi plaz. Copy plase," and wondering why it's not working.

It's obviously not your fault completely. Literally every expat here has had some sort of similar experience, but miscommunications are not exclusive to Korea.



Oh I totally understand that he would have needed clarification of my order.  He could have easily babbled something to me in Korean that I could have guessed he needed more info.  It's like walking into Baskins Robbins and asking for "Icecream please".  But the complete non-comprehension of what I was saying, you could see it in his eyes, that was what got me.  When he eventually did repeat "Ah, Koppee." I swear he said it EXACTLY as I said it 5 times earlier (well, at least a couple of the attempts I made).  He actually repeated what I said with a confused look on his face the last time, and then the bulb went off.  I'm sure many of us have had similar experiences and felt like a right dill, not just angry at the Korean, but knowing that it's hard to get right, and you don't get cut any slack, you are rarely met halfway and guided even a little bit, and it's frustrating.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2016, 12:53:01 PM by welcomebackkotter »

Offline The Arm

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 686
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #682 on: September 01, 2016, 12:51:50 PM »
I can accept foreigners won't have perfect pronunciation but if you're in a coffee shop then the Korean staffs' ears should be listening out for relevant words.  You're not going to go into a coffee shop and ask for a washing machine.  Just listen.

I was in a restaurant once and I called the waitress over and said "물좀주세요".  She looked at me like I had two heads.  But think...I'm eating in a restaurant so she should already be honing in on specific words.  Even if my pronunciation was terrible, she must have heard the 'm' sound and then the following vowel sound.  So I either want water or radish.  She just carried on staring at me, open-mouthed.

Anyway, I'm flogging a dead horse I know.  I'm making no real attempts to learn Korean these days so I can't exactly moan and complain  :sad:

Gasian

  • Guest
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #683 on: September 01, 2016, 12:59:17 PM »
I can accept foreigners won't have perfect pronunciation but if you're in a coffee shop then the Korean staffs' ears should be listening out for relevant words.  You're not going to go into a coffee shop and ask for a washing machine.  Just listen.

I was in a restaurant once and I called the waitress over and said "물좀주세요".  She looked at me like I had two heads.  But think...I'm eating in a restaurant so she should already be honing in on specific words.  Even if my pronunciation was terrible, she must have heard the 'm' sound and then the following vowel sound.  So I either want water or radish.  She just carried on staring at me, open-mouthed.

Anyway, I'm flogging a dead horse I know.  I'm making no real attempts to learn Korean these days so I can't exactly moan and complain  :sad:

+1

Offline yirj17

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2774
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #684 on: September 01, 2016, 01:03:03 PM »
If you mispronounce "28" it can end up being a curse word. Fortunately I've an older brother who studied Korean and taught me the distinction.

It's actually 18

28?

Like he gives 2 f*cks

 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)
Apparently 28 is worse, but I can't remember why.

Because 2 is worse than 1  :laugh: :laugh:

Anyway. My bad. I'm used to saying 28 since that's my Korean age so I rarely say 18. But like this guy said:

It can also be heard in 38, 78, 118, 1,818... :laugh:

Guess it just depends on how many you give  :wink:

Offline JahMoo

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
  • Gender: Female
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #685 on: September 01, 2016, 01:12:55 PM »
I can accept foreigners won't have perfect pronunciation but if you're in a coffee shop then the Korean staffs' ears should be listening out for relevant words.  You're not going to go into a coffee shop and ask for a washing machine.  Just listen.

I was in a restaurant once and I called the waitress over and said "물좀주세요".  She looked at me like I had two heads.  But think...I'm eating in a restaurant so she should already be honing in on specific words.  Even if my pronunciation was terrible, she must have heard the 'm' sound and then the following vowel sound.  So I either want water or radish.  She just carried on staring at me, open-mouthed.

Anyway, I'm flogging a dead horse I know.  I'm making no real attempts to learn Korean these days so I can't exactly moan and complain  :sad:

+1
I definitely get the frustration though. There are times when the thing on the menu is literally in English, and yet somehow it's my pronunciation that's strange. It's definitely a valid point. I just wanted to suggest that their POV might be valid too, at least half the time.

Online CO2

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3376
  • Gender: Male
  • Tangled Up In 주
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #686 on: September 01, 2016, 01:24:05 PM »
I can accept foreigners won't have perfect pronunciation but if you're in a coffee shop then the Korean staffs' ears should be listening out for relevant words.  You're not going to go into a coffee shop and ask for a washing machine.  Just listen.

I was in a restaurant once and I called the waitress over and said "물좀주세요".  She looked at me like I had two heads.  But think...I'm eating in a restaurant so she should already be honing in on specific words.  Even if my pronunciation was terrible, she must have heard the 'm' sound and then the following vowel sound.  So I either want water or radish.  She just carried on staring at me, open-mouthed.

Anyway, I'm flogging a dead horse I know.  I'm making no real attempts to learn Korean these days so I can't exactly moan and complain  :sad:

+1
I definitely get the frustration though. There are times when the thing on the menu is literally in English, and yet somehow it's my pronunciation that's strange. It's definitely a valid point. I just wanted to suggest that their POV might be valid too, at least half the time.
My favourite thing is when a menu will say 해물탕/해물전 and the English portion will say Haemultang/Haemuljeon

Uhhhhhhhhhh, thanks?

Offline kyndo

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 4179
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #687 on: September 01, 2016, 01:50:55 PM »
,,,
I suspect that, all things being equal, heavily accented English might be easier to understand than an equally poor Korean... but not by much.


But my point is that when you mispronounce English, you aren't accidentally saying completely different English words most of the time. And that adds an extra obstacle to things. Plus English-speakers trying to learn Korean is a relatively new thing here, so almost every Korean you come into contact with is going to be that "monolingual redneck". (I'm not trying to call all Koreans rednecks, this is just for comparison).
I don't really disagree with you, but I don't think people realise how finicky English really is: sure, many words have distinct sounds (especially longer ones), but there are so many different parts of English that can really throw off understanding. Word order is a biggie: English relies heavily on correct word order in order for the desired meaning to come through. Most other languages are much more forgiving (Greek being the prime example).
English also has incredibly messy conjugations that if done incorrectly can elicit those wtm reactions.

Anyway, like I've already said: I agree that English might be somewhat more forgiving than Korean, but the vast majority of a native English speaker's ability to understand accented/mangled English is just that they are so much more accustomed to it.  :undecided:
« Last Edit: September 01, 2016, 01:53:04 PM by kyndo »

Offline cjszk

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 894
  • Gender: Male
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #688 on: September 01, 2016, 02:07:27 PM »
I can accept foreigners won't have perfect pronunciation but if you're in a coffee shop then the Korean staffs' ears should be listening out for relevant words.  You're not going to go into a coffee shop and ask for a washing machine.  Just listen.

I was in a restaurant once and I called the waitress over and said "물좀주세요".  She looked at me like I had two heads.  But think...I'm eating in a restaurant so she should already be honing in on specific words.  Even if my pronunciation was terrible, she must have heard the 'm' sound and then the following vowel sound.  So I either want water or radish.  She just carried on staring at me, open-mouthed.

Anyway, I'm flogging a dead horse I know.  I'm making no real attempts to learn Korean these days so I can't exactly moan and complain  :sad:

+1
I definitely get the frustration though. There are times when the thing on the menu is literally in English, and yet somehow it's my pronunciation that's strange. It's definitely a valid point. I just wanted to suggest that their POV might be valid too, at least half the time.
My favourite thing is when a menu will say 해물탕/해물전 and the English portion will say Haemultang/Haemuljeon

Uhhhhhhhhhh, thanks?

Lol... I really don't appreciate having to explain to many different teachers that Korean in alphabet form is actually not accurate. I had one co-teacher that insisted that there was some specific way to use alphabet to make Korean student's names sound more accurate. It took her an entire month of struggling to finally get it- there isn't.

Ordering food at a restaurant where there is Korean words in an English menu... I actually have never seen this happen yet, probably because I don't really hang out with foreigners (losing my roots...).

English Speaker: Haemuljeon jusayoh (헤이물지온 주세이요우!)
Korean Speaker: ???????

Offline JahMoo

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
  • Gender: Female
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #689 on: September 01, 2016, 02:23:01 PM »
,,,
I suspect that, all things being equal, heavily accented English might be easier to understand than an equally poor Korean... but not by much.


But my point is that when you mispronounce English, you aren't accidentally saying completely different English words most of the time. And that adds an extra obstacle to things. Plus English-speakers trying to learn Korean is a relatively new thing here, so almost every Korean you come into contact with is going to be that "monolingual redneck". (I'm not trying to call all Koreans rednecks, this is just for comparison).
I don't really disagree with you, but I don't think people realise how finicky English really is: sure, many words have distinct sounds (especially longer ones), but there are so many different parts of English that can really throw off understanding. Word order is a biggie: English relies heavily on correct word order in order for the desired meaning to come through. Most other languages are much more forgiving (Greek being the prime example).
English also has incredibly messy conjugations that if done incorrectly can elicit those wtm reactions.

Anyway, like I've already said: I agree that English might be somewhat more forgiving than Korean, but the vast majority of a native English speaker's ability to understand accented/mangled English is just that they are so much more accustomed to it.  :undecided:

So we agree.

Offline yirgacheffe

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 584
  • Gender: Female
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #690 on: September 01, 2016, 02:46:18 PM »
If you mispronounce "28" it can end up being a curse word. Fortunately I've an older brother who studied Korean and taught me the distinction.

It's actually 18

28?

Like he gives 2 f*cks

 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)
Apparently 28 is worse, but I can't remember why.

Because 2 is worse than 1  :laugh: :laugh:

Anyway. My bad. I'm used to saying 28 since that's my Korean age so I rarely say 18. But like this guy said:

It can also be heard in 38, 78, 118, 1,818... :laugh:

Guess it just depends on how many you give  :wink:

I'm too braindead to join in on this big conversation about Koreans and their treatment of foreigners (which I agree can get pretty condescending), but I can comment on the 18 vs 28 thing lol

Basically 18 just sounds like 'f.uck' and 28 sounds like 'you f.ucker' which in English would probably make more sense if you think of it in the context of 'shut up, you motherf.ucker.' By the way, mods, I'm not trying to get around the filter here. Just joining the conversation about pronunciation. :angel:

Offline moonbrie

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 657
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #691 on: September 01, 2016, 03:28:36 PM »
I like speaking Korean with taxi drivers the best. Every taxi driver I've had a conversation with in Korean was very kind, tried to understand me, and would rephrase themselves when I didn't understand something. Maybe because they have more daily contact with foreigners than other Koreans? It's sad that "normal" Koreans can't have that level of sympathy for non-native speakers. Even "I'm very sorry, I can't understand" is better than the Korean Stare!

The other day I talked to an old lady at the bus stop. We just talked about the weather, where I was going, etc. If only more Koreans were like that learning the language while here wouldn't be so impossible.

Offline JeffGang

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Gender: Male
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #692 on: September 01, 2016, 09:58:44 PM »
I like taxi drivers too. And even though I've been here for about 8 years, and I was put off on studying Korean, I am taking another crack at it. Actually, I am writing some Korean lessons that are supposed to follow an easy way to learn it.

Here is why I quit trying before...
http://iexperiencekorea.com/blog/Gangneung/2018WinterOlympics/language-issues-immigrants-korea/

Here is the latest Korean lesson I wrote...
http://iexperiencekorea.com/blog/Gangneung/2018WinterOlympics/korean-lesson-7-three-new-variations/

Offline FreddyPrinceWilliam

  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 241
  • Gender: Male
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #693 on: September 01, 2016, 10:49:22 PM »
Hoooooly shit I had a terrible first day at the job. Let me just vent everything here. Some background info about me first. I'm a 20 year old Korean american student that moved to Korea recently from US. I got hired by a Hagwon nearby and as I said, it was my first day teaching today. I can understand korean little bit but I can't speak korean well.

First class was pop song class and I admit I wasn't very well prepared but the students couldn't understand the song at all (Skyfall by Adele. I chose a slow song on purpose). I wrote the lyrics on the board and tried to explain but half the class was me trying to explain english words in korean and hand motions. I doubt they learned anything from this class at all. They looked at me like this the whole time  :huh:. This was elementary school level

Second class I was a bit more prepared so I did okay I think. This time I was with middle school students. The song was Happy by Pharrell Williams and I made a fill in the blank in lyrics work sheet. The song was too fast for them so after letting them listen to the song 2 times and filling as much as they can, I just went over the answers. I had some time left so I decided to discuss the meaning of the song but they didn't understand that at all.

Third class was reading class (middle school). I liked this much more since it's more like following the instructions rather than coming up with your own stuff. Anyways, I just read out loud and told them to repeat after me. I asked them questions about the story after reading a paragraph or two. It was mostly one student answering all the questions though  :lipsrsealed:. I told her to let the other students answer but they had more trouble answering my questions. At the end of the class I told them to summarize what we read so far to me but they didn't understand that at all. I don't think they understood the story much

What I observed was that they have pretty good reading comprehension but they have pretty bad listening comprehension and speaking skills. I suspect this is due to Korea focusing on vocabulary and reading and neglect listening and speaking. This is hard for me since I have to speak in English. How can I teach anything when they don't even understand what I'm saying. I felt so ****** incompetent and I'm tired as ****. Any tips would be appreciated.  :sad:

WELCOME TO KOREA! LOLOLOLOL

Just push through it. Lower your expectations and don't expect to make huge changes.

The system in place here for learning English is broken. 

Offline Dave Stepz

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2201
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #694 on: September 02, 2016, 07:10:44 AM »

First class was pop song class and I admit I wasn't very well prepared but the students couldn't understand the song at all (Skyfall by Adele. I chose a slow song on purpose). I wrote the lyrics on the board and tried to explain but half the class was me trying to explain english words in korean and hand motions. I doubt they learned anything from this class at all. They looked at me like this the whole time  :huh:. This was elementary school level

Second class I was a bit more prepared so I did okay I think. This time I was with middle school students. The song was Happy by Pharrell Williams and I made a fill in the blank in lyrics work sheet. The song was too fast for them so after letting them listen to the song 2 times and filling as much as they can, I just went over the answers. I had some time left so I decided to discuss the meaning of the song but they didn't understand that at all.

Third class was reading class (middle school). I liked this much more since it's more like following the instructions rather than coming up with your own stuff. Anyways, I just read out loud and told them to repeat after me. I asked them questions about the story after reading a paragraph or two. It was mostly one student answering all the questions though  :lipsrsealed:. I told her to let the other students answer but they had more trouble answering my questions. At the end of the class I told them to summarize what we read so far to me but they didn't understand that at all. I don't think they understood the story much

What I observed was that they have pretty good reading comprehension but they have pretty bad listening comprehension and speaking skills. I suspect this is due to Korea focusing on vocabulary and reading and neglect listening and speaking. This is hard for me since I have to speak in English. How can I teach anything when they don't even understand what I'm saying. I felt so ****** incompetent and I'm tired as ****. Any tips would be appreciated.  :sad:

For a first day on the job I don't think 'discuss' is something you should try and do with middle school students.  It takes time to find the level of the students, but I agree that the language barrier will be hard to start with.  But over time you will become comfortable with each other, and it gets much easier.

Students wouldn't know how to summarise something, especially the first class with a new teacher.  Also I am not sure how much students can 'learn' from a pop song class, especially the first one. 

One thing to remember and this was one important thing I picked up from my CELTA was you have to grade your language.  Be very careful about the words you use.  Don't have overly wordy questions or explanations, because only the best students can follow.  If you can give a clear demonstration for the activity it will help a lot.  Students listening skills are usually good, but they are not used to answering the questions, just marking on a paper 1,2,3,4 or 5. 

Try not to worry about it.  It will get easier!!  ;D

Offline Kayos

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 592
  • Gender: Male
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #695 on: September 02, 2016, 07:56:03 AM »
Hoooooly ... snip

WELCOME TO KOREA! LOLOLOLOL

Just push through it. Lower your expectations and don't expect to make huge changes.

The system in place here for learning English is broken.

I've realized they only study for exams and don't really pay much attention to something that's not exam related. I know I shouldn't expect to make huge changes but I really hate feeling incompetent so I at least want to be able to communicate and explain things to them.  :undecided:

The exam stuff is true. I've been asked to add some questions based on my classes to the end of year exam, so before every lesson now, I scare them by saying: something that we do today, might be on the exam. - I get a little more attention and trying, but not much. :P
I also told them that the exam, and it being marked, will be done entirely by me. The day I told them that, I had 99% of my students attention haha. (The English teacher goes along with that too haha).

Offline PMDL123

  • Newgookin
  • Posts: 2
  • Gender: Female
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #696 on: September 02, 2016, 08:27:52 AM »
So I moved to my apartment yesterday in Habuk (Yangsan). After picking me up from the office of education and we headed to Yangsan, he kept telling me that he has two daughters at home and his wife is angry so he had to go home. I didn't get to the Immigration Bureau or the bank. Luckily I had told him I should buy groceries so he took me there. He didn't look too happy because he was such in a rush to go home. I realized after my co-teacher had left that my apartment did not have bedsheets, pillows or blankets. Thankfully my scarves were big enough to be used as my shower towel, my bedsheet and blanket. I didn't have wifi in my apartment so I walked to Paris Baquette and met an elderly Russian man whom I tried to speak to but he just cut me out. I am terribly lonely and although I know it's only the first few days here, I'm freaking out about how bad this could be. I just expected to be better taken cared of instead of just being tossed to figure everything out by myself. :(

Anyone in Habuk or has ever been in Habuk?

Offline Lurch

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 724
  • Gender: Male
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #697 on: September 02, 2016, 08:30:40 AM »
@PMDL123 Never heard of the place. Looks like you're close to Busan though. Go there.

Offline krissyboo75

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 640
  • Gender: Female
  • Please understand our unique culture~
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #698 on: September 02, 2016, 08:51:52 AM »
So I moved to my apartment yesterday in Habuk (Yangsan). After picking me up from the office of education and we headed to Yangsan, he kept telling me that he has two daughters at home and his wife is angry so he had to go home. I didn't get to the Immigration Bureau or the bank. Luckily I had told him I should buy groceries so he took me there. He didn't look too happy because he was such in a rush to go home. I realized after my co-teacher had left that my apartment did not have bedsheets, pillows or blankets. Thankfully my scarves were big enough to be used as my shower towel, my bedsheet and blanket. I didn't have wifi in my apartment so I walked to Paris Baquette and met an elderly Russian man whom I tried to speak to but he just cut me out. I am terribly lonely and although I know it's only the first few days here, I'm freaking out about how bad this could be. I just expected to be better taken cared of instead of just being tossed to figure everything out by myself. :(

Anyone in Habuk or has ever been in Habuk?
Here is a facebook page for the foreigner group in Busan. Yangsan is pretty close to Busan so there may be some folk in the group you can hang out with and also get information from.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/446252345467530/

Offline Kayos

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 592
  • Gender: Male
Re: RANTING/VENTING MEGATHREAD 3.0
« Reply #699 on: September 02, 2016, 09:51:22 AM »
So I moved to my apartment yesterday in Habuk (Yangsan). After picking me up from the office of education and we headed to Yangsan, he kept telling me that he has two daughters at home and his wife is angry so he had to go home. I didn't get to the Immigration Bureau or the bank. Luckily I had told him I should buy groceries so he took me there. He didn't look too happy because he was such in a rush to go home. I realized after my co-teacher had left that my apartment did not have bedsheets, pillows or blankets. Thankfully my scarves were big enough to be used as my shower towel, my bedsheet and blanket. I didn't have wifi in my apartment so I walked to Paris Baquette and met an elderly Russian man whom I tried to speak to but he just cut me out. I am terribly lonely and although I know it's only the first few days here, I'm freaking out about how bad this could be. I just expected to be better taken cared of instead of just being tossed to figure everything out by myself. :(

Anyone in Habuk or has ever been in Habuk?

Looks like you are very close to where I am as well. I haven't been to your area yet though. I hope your experience improves. I had a shitty experience similar to yours last year when I went to Japan, my futon hadn't been delivered and the house was empty (no plates, blankets, utensils, etc.). I had to use 4 towels as a matress and blankets for 3 days - I barely slept; also, the Eikaiwa had a rule that: if you yawn in class, you are fired.

 



Ohmyzip.com From US To Korea - $7.50 (LB)
[SHOP US, SHIP KOREA] From $7.50 (1LB) + $1.74 per pound only! Use the Ohmyzip U.S. a tax-free state address as your shipping address at checkout. Sign up now to get a 10% off coupon on shipping. <Freight Forwarding Service / Courier Service>
http://www.ohmyzip.com/