December 13, 2018, 12:00:00 AM


Author Topic: Doing Privates in Korea  (Read 14445 times)

Offline asiaman

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 58
  • Gender: Male
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #60 on: June 19, 2016, 04:04:33 PM »
There's tonnes of teachers doing privates under the table in China.

Offline Mezoti97

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2604
  • Gender: Female
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #61 on: June 20, 2016, 07:54:17 AM »
I'm saying that's how you take Advantage of your F visa. By taking part time jobs and working private classes As well.

Fair enough, although while that may be a viable option for some F-visa holders, I personally wouldn't prefer to go that route, since if I only did a bunch of part-time jobs and privates, I wouldn't receive benefits such as pension, severance, health insurance, etc., so it wouldn't be worth it to me to forgo those benefits by only doing several part-time work gigs, as those benefits are important to me.

Online eggieguffer

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 4646
  • Gender: Male
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #62 on: June 20, 2016, 08:12:48 AM »
I'm saying that's how you take Advantage of your F visa. By taking part time jobs and working private classes As well.

Fair enough, although while that may be a viable option for some F-visa holders, I personally wouldn't prefer to go that route, since if I only did a bunch of part-time jobs and privates, I wouldn't receive benefits such as pension, severance, health insurance, etc., so it wouldn't be worth it to me to forgo those benefits by only doing several part-time work gigs, as those benefits are important to me.

Those benefits are just money at the end of the day. Just calculate how much they would cost to pay for from your own pocket and if you can still earn more doing various jobs, you're at an advantage.

Offline Mezoti97

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2604
  • Gender: Female
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #63 on: June 20, 2016, 08:36:45 AM »
Those benefits are just money at the end of the day. Just calculate how much they would cost to pay for from your own pocket and if you can still earn more doing various jobs, you're at an advantage.

Again, while that may be a viable option for some F-visa holders to go that route, I don't think it would be for me. But that's just me.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2016, 09:49:42 AM by Mezoti97 »

Offline Mamamooo

  • Newgookin
  • Posts: 1
  • Gender: Female
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #64 on: January 18, 2017, 02:15:46 AM »
When I stopped working for EPIK in February this year, I switched over to privates (on a resident F visa, so legally). Working a few hours a week, having an open schedule I choose, etc. has been great.

Legally, all income needs to be reported on next year's taxes (for which I have an English speaking CPA to assist me). Having taught children for the past 5 years, I decided to focus only on adults for privates (less stable but good money when their companies foot the bill). Also, if one teaches adults only, you needn't register their names / addresses with the MOE (you do if teaching children).

Likewise, one needn't register as a taxable entity (think sole proprietorship) with the tax office unless bringing in over 75,000,000 per year in revenue. That's according to Korean income tax law.

I know this topic is a bit dated but would you mind confirming for me how to go about applying for the license? You seem to be the only person I've found that applied most recently and all other information seems to contradict each other.

So to my understanding, I'll need an F visa (F5, check), an apostilled degree, a criminal background check (FBI and apostilled?), proof of residence, photos, and the addresses of my students since I'll be teaching at their houses. Is that all?

Also, is it true that the MOE limits how much you can charge for elementary students? And one more question. I read on the MOE website that current college and grad students do not need a license to tutor. Does that only apply for Korean citizens?

Thanks a lot if you can help. If not, thanks anyways.

Offline slycordinator

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1246
  • Gender: Male
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #65 on: February 03, 2017, 12:35:54 AM »
I've been offered jobs walking through Emart. Well.... my wife has been offered job offers directed at me. She's Korean so I've had a few Korean moms stop her and I in the kimchi aisle and ask her if I'd be willing to do private lessons.

I turn them down because I'm with EPIK and don't want to ruin a good thing if I get caught. There was actually a "spy" of sorts in our city. He (Korean) was going around and trying to get foreign teachers at public schools to do privates in order to turn them in.

If you are married to a Korean surely you are on the F visa and the bonus of that is, you can do privates legally. Perfect for some extra money.

Private work is still against the EPIK contract. This rule also applies to Korean teachers. While he won't be deported or face any issues from immigration, it's grounds for dismissal.
I teach in the US now. My wife is Korean. When we visited my folks over Christmas, I picked up extra shifts at my old job for some extra cash. It blew my wife's mind that this was allowed.

Offline hockeyfan_inkorea

  • Super Waygook
  • ***
  • Posts: 388
  • Gender: Male
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #66 on: March 28, 2017, 10:27:37 PM »
Has anybody gone through this process fairly recently? My wife is Korean and I am on an F-visa and I'm looking into doing it the legal route.

My wife called our POE and I'm trying to figure out if she misunderstood something or if I am. From what I have seen here and elsewhere is that the documents needed are basically similar to those needed for applying to the E2 visa (plus a few others). What I'm most curious about is that the POE told us that I need to go to my (US) embassy and get my diploma apostilled. I tried explaining that (as I understand it) the diploma has to be apostilled by the secretary of state where the degree was issued. The POE sounded pretty confident that I need a notarization or something along those lines, but notarization and apostille are two very different levels of document.

Any help would be very much appreciated!
« Last Edit: March 28, 2017, 10:29:15 PM by hockeyfan_inkorea »

Offline Seoul2201

  • Newgookin
  • Posts: 3
  • Gender: Male
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #67 on: March 30, 2017, 10:52:34 AM »
Hi, Having just done this as an F-5 visa holder with a Korean wife. I went with my medical report, certified copy of my diploma and original criminal record check from my home country, both apostilled.

The local MOE office then applies for a Korean criminal check. If all is well they will issue your private tutoring licence. That's it.

Offline Perire_Animus

  • Newgookin
  • Posts: 3
  • Gender: Female
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #68 on: December 06, 2018, 05:32:02 AM »
If you are married to a Korean surely you are on the F visa and the bonus of that is, you can do privates legally. Perfect for some extra money.

To add to what Menlyn said, the thing is, you may not realize it but most contracts stipulate that you are not allowed to take additional jobs (e.g., teaching privates), regardless of your visa status, despite that immigration-wise, it's not illegal for F-visa holders to do additional jobs -- but if your contract says you can't (again, regardless of your visa status), then technically you're not supposed to (or else risk getting in trouble with your main job or possibly even get fired). I have an F visa and every contract I've ever had in Korea all contained such stipulation (me not being allowed to take on any additional work outside of my main job). It didn't matter to any of my jobs I've held in Korea that my visa status is an F visa; the contract stipulation of not being allowed to take on any extra side jobs still applies to me.

According to a lawyer I spoke to about being an F4 visa, your employer cannot prevent you from working other jobs even if itís in your contract. The law trumps contracts, you can still work other jobs regardless if itís in your contract that you canít. They canít prevent you from doing so because youíre an F visa holder. My coworker whoís an expat married the boss and became an Fvisa holder is working other jobs outside his main one despite the fact that itís on his contract that we cannot hold other jobs. Regardless, your employer doesnít have complete control over you like they would with E2 visas. Even my current job tried to deny me doing volunteer work outside my working hours. Thatís illegal.

Online sligo

  • Expert Waygook
  • ****
  • Posts: 988
  • Gender: Male
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #69 on: December 06, 2018, 02:36:47 PM »
If you are married to a Korean surely you are on the F visa and the bonus of that is, you can do privates legally. Perfect for some extra money.

To add to what Menlyn said, the thing is, you may not realize it but most contracts stipulate that you are not allowed to take additional jobs (e.g., teaching privates), regardless of your visa status, despite that immigration-wise, it's not illegal for F-visa holders to do additional jobs -- but if your contract says you can't (again, regardless of your visa status), then technically you're not supposed to (or else risk getting in trouble with your main job or possibly even get fired). I have an F visa and every contract I've ever had in Korea all contained such stipulation (me not being allowed to take on any additional work outside of my main job). It didn't matter to any of my jobs I've held in Korea that my visa status is an F visa; the contract stipulation of not being allowed to take on any extra side jobs still applies to me.

According to a lawyer I spoke to about being an F4 visa, your employer cannot prevent you from working other jobs even if itís in your contract. The law trumps contracts, you can still work other jobs regardless if itís in your contract that you canít. They canít prevent you from doing so because youíre an F visa holder. My coworker whoís an expat married the boss and became an Fvisa holder is working other jobs outside his main one despite the fact that itís on his contract that we cannot hold other jobs. Regardless, your employer doesnít have complete control over you like they would with E2 visas. Even my current job tried to deny me doing volunteer work outside my working hours. Thatís illegal.

What about F6 visa holders?

Online oglop

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1639
  • Gender: Male
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #70 on: December 06, 2018, 03:29:25 PM »
yep, however, i think if you work for a govt institution i.e. public school or university, you can't work privates regardless. i'm fairly certain this is correct, but anyone please feel free to correct me

Offline Mezoti97

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2604
  • Gender: Female
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #71 on: December 06, 2018, 04:33:10 PM »
According to a lawyer I spoke to about being an F4 visa, your employer cannot prevent you from working other jobs even if itís in your contract. The law trumps contracts, you can still work other jobs regardless if itís in your contract that you canít. They canít prevent you from doing so because youíre an F visa holder. My coworker whoís an expat married the boss and became an Fvisa holder is working other jobs outside his main one despite the fact that itís on his contract that we cannot hold other jobs. Regardless, your employer doesnít have complete control over you like they would with E2 visas. Even my current job tried to deny me doing volunteer work outside my working hours. Thatís illegal.

Okay. I was just simply stating that every employment contract at every job I've had in Korea, has a clause in it stating that I can't work outside jobs without informing my employer, and that some people seem to find that surprising when they find out that I'm an F-visa holder. Since I don't care to work an outside job and have no interest in doing so, it's not something I've ever tried to pursue, but that's just me. Not saying that it's not possible.

Offline slycordinator

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1246
  • Gender: Male
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #72 on: December 08, 2018, 05:12:05 AM »
According to a lawyer I spoke to about being an F4 visa, your employer cannot prevent you from working other jobs even if itís in your contract. The law trumps contracts, you can still work other jobs regardless if itís in your contract that you canít. They canít prevent you from doing so because youíre an F visa holder. My coworker whoís an expat married the boss and became an Fvisa holder is working other jobs outside his main one despite the fact that itís on his contract that we cannot hold other jobs. Regardless, your employer doesnít have complete control over you like they would with E2 visas. Even my current job tried to deny me doing volunteer work outside my working hours. Thatís illegal.

Okay. I was just simply stating that every employment contract at every job I've had in Korea, has a clause in it stating that I can't work outside jobs without informing my employer, and that some people seem to find that surprising when they find out that I'm an F-visa holder. Since I don't care to work an outside job and have no interest in doing so, it's not something I've ever tried to pursue, but that's just me. Not saying that it's not possible.
While the comment above is correct that they can't legally stop you from working somewhere else, they could tell you that they'll fire you if you continue.

Offline Mezoti97

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2604
  • Gender: Female
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #73 on: December 10, 2018, 07:50:41 AM »
While the comment above is correct that they can't legally stop you from working somewhere else, they could tell you that they'll fire you if you continue.

Okay. Again, working an outside part-time gig isn't something I'm interested in doing, but that's just me.

Offline slycordinator

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1246
  • Gender: Male
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #74 on: December 11, 2018, 07:54:54 AM »
I wasn't really disagreeing with you, by the way. I was just clarifying what the person you had been responding to left out of the equation.

Worker: You can't stop me from working a second job. It's illegal.
Boss: I'm stopping you from working this one. You're fired.
Worker: Oh. I didn't think about that.

And I worked with one guy back home who got let go because he got a second job in the same line of work where they both had non-compete clauses essentially against each other.

Offline Mezoti97

  • The Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2604
  • Gender: Female
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #75 on: December 11, 2018, 10:37:45 AM »
I wasn't really disagreeing with you, by the way. I was just clarifying what the person you had been responding to left out of the equation.

Worker: You can't stop me from working a second job. It's illegal.
Boss: I'm stopping you from working this one. You're fired.
Worker: Oh. I didn't think about that.

And I worked with one guy back home who got let go because he got a second job in the same line of work where they both had non-compete clauses essentially against each other.

Yes, I know. I was just acknowledging your previous post, that's all.

Online Savant

  • Hero of Waygookistan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1694
Re: Doing Privates in Korea
« Reply #76 on: Yesterday at 09:07:23 AM »
"Don't ask, Don't tell."